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Wynken, Blynken, and Nod by Eugene Field
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Wynken, Blynken, and Nod

by Eugene Field

Other authors: Giselle Potter (Illustrator)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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In my opinion this is a good book. It is a poem and it has a really nice flow. At the beginning of the poem you think that their are three characters being referenced in the story to find out there is just one sleepy child . I love the way the author referenced the character’s two eyes and his head. The eyes were wynken and blynken and his head was nod. So in his own way he was describing the effects of a sleepy child. I also liked the illustrations. The illustrator’s use of color throughout the book was exceptional. The colors covered the whole page depicting the night sky. The hues were bold and bright to be dark colors, they were still standing out. The imagery in the story was very repetitive but the author found ways to make each picture different. The message of this poem is it’s ok to use your imagination ( )
  vbarbe1 | Mar 31, 2014 |
This book as loved into oblivion at our house. I LOVED reading the dreamy, mesmerizing poem instead of some of the more grating children's books, and the pictures of the three children harvesting stars and fish and then coming back home to bed were wonderful. It was read almost every night for a year, and I'm planning to get a new copy now that my younger is almost two. ( )
  AliaZ | Mar 30, 2013 |
Wynken, Blynken, and Nod is a book about a lullaby poem. It tells the story of three young fisherman boys who sail off into the night sky on a wooden shoe. They sail away to fish in the sky, which they call the sea. In the end it turns out that Wynken, Blynken and Nod are just a little boys facial features, and the wooden shoe is his bed.

To me, the mood and setting of this book make the perfect bedtime story. The pictures are magical and they can even promote sweet dreams!

You could use this if you worked at a daycare, for naptime or you could have the children draw pictures of what their "sky sea" would look like. ( )
  jessiepainter | Feb 10, 2009 |
I’ve read the Eugene Field poem before, but this lovely illustrated book (by Giselle Potter) brings the story to life. I love the color blue and there is lots of blue in the paintings of the three fishermen who sail off in to the sky in a wooden shoe.
  rebeccareid | Feb 8, 2009 |
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Eugene Fieldprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Potter, GiselleIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Westerman, JohannaIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0375841962, Hardcover)

WYNKEN, BLYNKEN AND Nod one night
Sailed off in a wooden shoe–
Sailed off on a river of crystal light
Into a sea of dew . . .

So begins Eugene Field’s lovely bedtime poem, which tells of three wee fishermen who sail up to the stars, and a boy who imagines it all before he drifts off to sleep. Field’s timeless text has lulled generations of little listeners into dreamland, and this version, complimented by Giselle Potter’s magical illustrations, is perhaps the most enchanting—and the closest to Fields’ own vision—of all.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:30:17 -0400)

A classic lullaby poem about three fishermen who try to catch the stars in nets of silver and gold.

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