HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Whatcha Mean, What's a Zine? by Esther…
Loading...

Whatcha Mean, What's a Zine? (edition 2006)

by Esther Watson, Mark Todd (Illustrator)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
151779,164 (3.92)None
Member:kxlly
Title:Whatcha Mean, What's a Zine?
Authors:Esther Watson
Other authors:Mark Todd (Illustrator)
Info:Graphia (2006), Edition: None, Paperback, 112 pages
Collections:Your library, Read, Unowned
Rating:***
Tags:zines, comics, non-fiction, how-to, Watson, American, DIY, topics, subjects, techniques, screenprinting, sizes, format, copying, collating, publishing, libraries, 2006

Work details

Whatcha Mean, What's a Zine? by Esther Pearl Watson

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
One of the more inspirational books I've read recently.
Their thoughts on the integration of technology and the traditional zine presented an interesting "argument". ( )
  KingdomOfOdd | Dec 9, 2013 |
Highly qualified zine experts, Todd and Watson, offer this informative introduction to the world of zines and mini-comics. The book begins with definitions and explores various materials, themes, formats, and technology. Tracing the zine's roots to the self-publishing efforts of Benjamin Franklin and other historical figures, this book works to elevate this expressive form over that of blogs. The book itself is an amalgamation of comics and doodles, visual collage, straightforward information, and helpful advice. Entertaining in addition to being educational, "Whatcha Mean What's a Zine?" is a useful resource for those students interested in self-expression, self-publishing, or other DIY endeavors. Perfect for the young adult crowd, this little book offers suggestions and resources for reclaiming and personalizing the art of the zine, and refreshes any young adult nonfiction section. Recommended. ( )
  LeafingLight | Nov 19, 2012 |
This is a guide to the whys and hows of making a zine (a small, homemade magazine). The layout is formatted to resemble the cut-and-paste, roughly assembled aesthetic of actual zines, which is an amusing conceit but in some cases makes the text difficult to read. Watson and Todd do a great job of communicating the storied culture of zine-making.

This would be a great recommendation for a middle schooler or teen bursting at the seams with creative energy. Many teens, however, may simply view zines as old-fashioned blogs. ( )
  megmcg624 | Oct 30, 2009 |
A good introduction to zines in a format that is easy to understand and will be a great resource for any creative teen.
  YAlit | May 7, 2009 |
Great layout and how to, especially the how to make a zine from one sheet of paper section. ( )
  AGYAG | Dec 12, 2007 |
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0618563156, Paperback)

A zine is a handmade magazine or mini-comic about anything you can imagine: favorite bands, personal stories, subcultures, or collections. They contain diary entries, rants, interviews, and stories. They can be by one person or many, found in stores, traded at comic conventions, exchanged with friends, or given away for free. Zines are not a new idea: they’ve been around for years under various names (chapbooks, flyers, pamphlets). People with independent ideas have been getting their word out since before there were printing presses.

This book is for anyone who wants to create their own zine. It’s for learning tips and tricks from contributors who have been at the fore front of the zine movement. It’s for getting inspired to put thoughts and ideas down on paper. It’s for learning how to design and print your own zine so you can put it in others’ hands. Whatcha Mean, What’s a Zine? is for anyone who has something to say.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:18:37 -0400)

A zine is a handmade magazine or mini-comic about anything you can imagine: favorite bands, personal stories, subcultures, or collections. They contain diary entries, rants, interviews, and stories. They can be by one person or many, found in stores, traded at comic conventions, exchanged with friends, or given away for free. Zines are not a new idea: they've been around for years under various names (chapbooks, flyers, pamphlets). People with independent ideas have been getting their word out since before there were printing presses. This book is for anyone who wants to create their own zine. It's for learning tips and tricks from contributors who have been at the forefront of the zine movement. It's for learning how to design and print your own zine so you can put it in others' hands. It's for anyone who has something to say.--From publisher description.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
1 avail.
39 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.92)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 6
3.5 1
4 12
4.5 2
5 7

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 92,348,289 books! | Top bar: Always visible