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John Dies at the End by David Wong
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John Dies at the End (edition 2007)

by David Wong

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1,8231023,834 (3.83)82
Member:ajhackwith
Title:John Dies at the End
Authors:David Wong
Info:Permuted Press (2007), Paperback, 376 pages
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John Dies at the End by David Wong

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Showing 1-5 of 101 (next | show all)
Great read. Funny and fast paced. I'm not surprised it's being made into a movie. ( )
  danojacks | Jan 5, 2017 |
This book was on a list from which I pull many of my reading selections. Every time I noticed this title on that list, there was always a brief pause while I speculated about it. Is John the main character? Does he in fact die at the end of the book, or at the end of something else? Is it a physical death, a metaphorical death, or a spiritual death? Is it a complete lie? I had many, many other theories, but I knew absolutely nothing about the book itself. When the Kindle edition went on sale a month ago, I grabbed it so I could finally get some answers.

I’d believed this was a fantasy book, but it reads more like a horror story to me. I could see reasons to classify it as either horror, fantasy, or science fiction, depending on which parts stick out the most to the reader. I’m happy that I went into it completely blind, and I think a large part of the fun in reading this came from not knowing what to expect, so I’m afraid to try talking about the plot. The story is crazy anyway, and the only way I could make it sound very sensible would be to explain things that aren’t revealed until near the end. I’m going to limit myself to this: The main characters in the story are two early-twentyish males who are completely immature. They get caught up in some… strange events. Chaos ensues.

I’d be afraid to recommend this book to anybody, and yet I wish everybody I know would go read it right now so I can find out what they think when they’re done. :) Most of the time, I was completely wrapped up in the story, but once in a while I would pause and think to myself, “Ok, now that’s just ridiculous.” But even though this book has a lot of crazy stuff in it, the story still felt coherent and interesting. It isn’t one of those stories where the author throws in every crazy thing he or she can imagine to the point that it overwhelms the story.

There were some inconsistencies, most of which I blame on the unreliableness of the narrator rather than on problems with the writing itself. There’s a lot of goriness, cussing, and crude humor. There was also a lot of clever and truly funny stuff, and the story completely sucked me in. It's told in a slightly non-linear fashion, which helped keep it interesting. It wasn’t a terribly scary book, but there were some parts in the second half that did start to creep me out a little. I think it probably depends on what scares you. I could easily see other people being freaked out by completely different parts that didn’t bother me at all. This is a complete story without any cliffhangers, but there were some interesting reveals near the end that I hope will be dealt with in more detail in the sequel. The sequel is definitely the next book I intend to read. ( )
2 vote YouKneeK | Dec 19, 2016 |
So this one is just plain weird. I found it very tough to finish- set it aside several times but finally persevered. Two guys are 'infected' with extra sensitivity to the alternate creatures that appear to be swarming their world after drinking the soy sauce.. They set out to protect, others, destroy the creatures and survive several more than bizarre experiences. The narrator has an appealing self deprecating quality- but the story is just too out there for my tastes. ( )
  HelenGress | Sep 30, 2016 |
Soooooooooooooooooo good. A blurb on the back of the book calls it a mix of Douglas Adams and Stephen King. YES PLEASE. It’s impossible to imitate Adams’ inimitable randomness -- but David Wong seems more inspired by Adams, rather than imitating him. His prose is chock full of overdone and off-kilter metaphors, and the plot rambles about from one adventure to another, but the tone is more campy-scary Evil Dead than Adam’s dry British humor.

The story bounces around between timelines... and not always simply for effect. David, the narrator, and John, his charismatic and extremely irresponsible friend, come across a strange recreational drug called Soy Sauce that gives users a window into another dimension. After several crazy late-night phone calls, Dave gets a call from John while John is sitting right across from him, and it all goes to hell from there. ( )
  Andibook | Sep 9, 2016 |
Soooooooooooooooooo good. A blurb on the back of the book calls it a mix of Douglas Adams and Stephen King. YES PLEASE. It’s impossible to imitate Adams’ inimitable randomness -- but David Wong seems more inspired by Adams, rather than imitating him. His prose is chock full of overdone and off-kilter metaphors, and the plot rambles about from one adventure to another, but the tone is more campy-scary Evil Dead than Adam’s dry British humor.

The story bounces around between timelines... and not always simply for effect. David, the narrator, and John, his charismatic and extremely irresponsible friend, come across a strange recreational drug called Soy Sauce that gives users a window into another dimension. After several crazy late-night phone calls, Dave gets a call from John while John is sitting right across from him, and it all goes to hell from there. ( )
  Andibook | Sep 9, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 101 (next | show all)
JDATE is the rare genre novel that manages to keep its sense of humor strong without ever diminishing the scares; David is a consistently hilarious narrator whose one-liners and running commentary are sincere in a way that makes the horrors he confronts even more unsettling. Plot-wise, for a good two-thirds of the book, it seems like Wong is more interested in piling on weirder and weirder threats than fitting the pieces together, and while his invention never flags, the accumulation of horrors eventually threatens to turn the narrative into a breathless series of “And then?”s. Still, the tone and white-knuckle pacing cover up a lot of sins, and Wong manages to pull everything together for a finale that’s both stomach-churningly freaky and oddly moving. It’s the sort of thing that leaves readers breathless and nauseous, but surprisingly hungry for more.
 

» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
David Wongprimary authorall editionscalculated
Arnold, RichDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Grom, RobCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Spear, GeoffCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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First words
Solving the following riddle will reveal the awful secret behind the universe, assuming you do not go utterly mad in the attempt.
Quotations
Something coming back from the dead was almost always bad news. Movies taught me that. For every one Jesus you get a million zombies.
Let's say you have an ax. Just a cheap one, from Home Depot. On one bitter winter day, you use said ax to behead a man. Don't worry, the man was already dead. Or maybe you should worry, because you're the one who shot him.
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Wikipedia in English (3)

Book description
STOP.You should not have touched this book with your bare hands.NO, don’t put it down. It’s too late.They’re watching you.My name is David Wong. My best friend is John. Those names are fake. You might want to change yours.You may not want to know about the things you’ll read on these pages, about the sauce, about Korrok, about the invasion, and the future. But it’s too late. You touched the book. You’re in the game. You’re under the eye.The only defense is knowledge. You need to read this book, to the end. Even the part with the bratwurst. Why? You just have to trust me. The important thing is this:The drug is called Soy Sauce and it gives users a window into another dimension. John and I never had the chance to say no. You still do.Unfortunately for us, if you make the right choice, we’ll have a much harder time explaining how to fight off the otherworldly invasion currently threatening to enslave humanity.I’m sorry to have involved you in this, I really am. But as you read about these terrible events and the very dark epoch the world is about to enter as a result, it is crucial you keep one thing in mind: None of this is was my fault.

In this reissue of an Internet phenomenon originally slapped between two covers in 2007 by indie Permutus Press, Wong—Cracked.com editor Jason Pargin's alter ego—adroitly spoofs the horror genre while simultaneously offering up a genuinely horrifying story. The terror is rooted in a substance known as “soy sauce,” a paranormal psychoactive that opens video store clerk Wong's—and his penis-obsessed friend John's—minds to higher levels of consciousness. Or is it just hell seeping into the unnamed Midwestern town where Wong and the others live? Meat monsters, wig-wearing scorpion aberrations and wingless white flies that burrow into human skin threaten to kill Wong and his crew before infesting the rest of the world. A multidimensional plot unfolds as the unlikely heroes drink lots of beer and battle the paradoxes of time and space, as well as the clichés of first-person-shooter video games and fantasy gore films. Sure to please the Fangoria set while appealing to a wider audience, the book's smart take on fear manages to tap into readers' existential dread on one page, then have them laughing the next. 

David Wong is the pseudonym of Jason Pargin, online humorist, National Lampoon contributor, and editor-in-chief of Cracked.com.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312659148, Paperback)

NOW A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE

STOP.

You should not have touched this book with your bare hands.

NO, don’t put it down. It’s too late.

They’re watching you.

My name is David Wong. My best friend is John. Those names are fake. You might want to change yours.

You may not want to know about the things you’ll read on these pages, about the sauce, about Korrok, about the invasion, and the future. But it’s too late. You touched the book. You’re in the game. You’re under the eye.

The only defense is knowledge. You need to read this book, to the end. Even the part with the bratwurst. Why? You just have to trust me.

 

The important thing is this:

The drug is called Soy Sauce and it gives users a window into another dimension. 

John and I never had the chance to say no. 

You still do.

Unfortunately for us, if you make the right choice, we’ll have a much harder time explaining how to fight off the otherworldly invasion currently threatening to enslave humanity.

            I’m sorry to have involved you in this, I really am. But as you read about these terrible events and the very dark epoch the world is about to enter as a result, it is crucial you keep one thing in mind:

 

None of this is was my fault.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:19:28 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

This may be the story of John and David, a drug called soy sauce, and other-worldly beings invading the planet. Or, it may be the story of two beer-drinking friends who live in an unnamed Midwestern town and only think something horrific is going on. But the important thing is, according to the narrator, "None of this is my fault.".… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 5 descriptions

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