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Smacking Back
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Smacking Back

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Recently added byDanaBurkey, Robert.Zimmermann

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This one was 3.5, but I chose not to round up. It had a cool point of view as far as the characters and also the social issues it tackled, but I feel like it could have been more effective in the way the reader learned about the story. I was confused for quite a while, and even by the end some things were hazy. I like that the readers were not spoon fed, but a little more would have been nice. It reminded me of Uglies, but not as good. All in all it was not terrible, but also not overly impactful and wonderful. ( )
  DanaBurkey | Apr 10, 2016 |
As can be found in the description, this story’s main theme is bullying. What caught my eye was that it’s a sci-fi story as well. That was a fun combination because it showed that it really doesn’t matter what the time period or society in question is, bullying is always an issue.

Even in the world of Smacking Back, where information can be fed directly into someone’s brain, there are people who feel the need to take advantage of others just so they can get away with not doing their work. This is the classic situation of a bully getting the weaker kid to do his/her homework, but with a futuristic flare.

While the bullying is the theme in the forefront, and I feel that it was well executed without being preachy, I also enjoyed the technology that Rede threw into the story. It doesn’t seem far-fetched to think that being so physically connected to the net is in our near future. It also, like many great sci-fi stories, brings up possible issues that could arise with the advance in technology. There are always consequences to go along with the benefits. This works to aid the creation of the bullying situation, as well as hints at the question of what other issues could this future society have through this technology.

This story brings up an issue that’s been around for thousands of years, but one that seems to be a big focus in our culture today when we look to eradicate it. I think that getting into the mind of the victim in this instance gives good insight into the victim mindset. It also leaves the reader questioning the actions of everyone involved, not just the bullies. ( )
  Robert.Zimmermann | Oct 7, 2013 |
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