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Anyone But You: The Third in the Twisted Lit…
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Anyone But You: The Third in the Twisted Lit Series

by Kim Askew

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I have read every book in this series. Each one can be read as a stand alone novel. By far my favorite book is this one. I loved the modern day twist that the authors put on the famed couple, Romeo and Juliet. It is hard to find anything original anymore that does this story justice. I thought that the authors did a good job of revamping this tale. However I must admit that I found I liked when I went back in time with Benny and Nick. They were really the "meat" of the story and how the feud between the Caputos and the Montes.

I could not stop reading this book. However in the beginning it did take me a moment to figure out the flow of the book. With each chapter alternating between the present and the past. So to stop and switch the flow from what was happening in the present to go back to the past was not as smooth. It only took me until the beginning of chapter three to figure this out. I liked the ending. Anyone But You is a charming, fun book to read. ( )
  Cherylk | Feb 23, 2014 |
(3.5)

Due to copy and paste, formatting has been lost.

Romeo & Juliet is one of my least favorite Shakespeare plays. I just can't get over the stupidity of the entire story, and I really don't find it romantic. Insta-love, then everyone dies. That's a real winner there. Which is why I was pleasantly surprised to find that I actually enjoyed Anyone But You. I was expecting the humor and the sense of romantic comedy that comes with these girls together, but this was the first book of theirs that I really liked.

At first, I was a little bit confused, and kind of unsure - as y'all know, I don't follow POV switches very well - unless they're very well written. And while the POVs in Anyone But You weren't badly written, not at all, the first switch was very confusing. Not only did it switch POVs, it all switched eras. Like, all the way back to the thirties - and that was a tiny bit disconcerting at first.

I didn't connect with the main character, Gigi, and I didn't really buy the romance between Roman and Gigi - but I'm willing to forgive the instalove. Because, as I mentioned before, the original play was built on insta-love. I would have liked to have seen more development, but I'm fine with what was presented.

I actually liked the scenes from the past, told through Nick's eyes, better than the present day. Nick was a more complex character, and it was nice to see all of the things that tore Benny & Nick apart. The development in that part of the story was absolutely phenomenal! I predicted what the problem would be, but since I'd already read the play... it was okay.

The most interesting part of Anyone But You was picking out names and faces and personalities from the original play - and comparing them. That was a lot of fun. All in all, Anyone But You really wasn't a bad read. I actually really liked it, and it was a wonderful re-imagining of Romeo & Juliet. ( )
  MVTheBookBabe | Feb 9, 2014 |
This smart, gripping, sigh-inducing update of Romeo and Juliet takes on serious issues but still manages to be fun. Anyone But You is the third entry in the wonderful Twisted Lit series based on Shakespeare--each story is independent and doesn’t need to be read in sequence--and so far the books just keep getting better and better.

Gigi Caputo and Roman Monte are Chicago teenagers whose feuding families own Italian restaurants that are just blocks apart. No one remembers how or why the feud started, but the back and forth sabotage by some of the hotheaded younger family members has gotten increasingly intense. When Gigi and Roman meet there are instant sparks, but the authors do a great job of making their mutual attraction credible and something you care about by deepening their connection beyond initial chemistry.

Chapters alternate between the present day with Gigi and Roman, and the 1930’s-1940’s which is when their great grandfathers were best friends before the feud began. Like the other two books in this series, Anyone But You has a vivid sense of place, rich with details that set and individuate the times and locations without long paragraphs of descriptions to bog down the story. Gigi works at her family’s restaurant and you can see the checkered tablecloths, smell the marinara, and feel the heat of the kitchen. The chapters with the great grandfathers as up and coming young men bring their older Italian neighborhood to life, incorporating the 1933 Chicago World’s Fair and WWII into the plot and allowing us to see the world through their eyes.

The plot and characters take inspiration from Shakespeare’s play, but there’s plenty of innovation which kept me in suspense about the outcome. Magic isn’t part of the Twisted Lit stories, but there’s something magical about them. Maybe it’s having timeless themes in modern settings, or maybe it’s the writing which without being “pretty” somehow has a subtle glow that I can’t define, maybe something like a Rembrandt painting. In any case, I hope there is a fourth Twisted Lit novel, and I can’t wait to see which play is chosen and how the authors remake it. ( )
  Jaylia3 | Jan 18, 2014 |
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In this modern take on Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet," set in Chicago, the teenaged daughter and son of two feuding Italian American families, who own competing restaurants, fall in love.

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