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Door Jams: Amazing Doors of New York City by…
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Door Jams: Amazing Doors of New York City

by Allan Markman

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Disclaimer: I received this book free from Schiffer Publishing Ltd. in exchange for an honest review. I did not receive any form of compensation.

First things first, being a stickler for correct word usage, it really irked me that they titled the book Door Jams when in actuality it should be titled Door Jambs. This is something that the editor should have caught. Unfortunately, most people don't realize that jambs is the term that means the front side of the door. Whereas, jams could either be used for a snag in traffic or a fruit preserve.

Ok, now we have that out of the way, this was a very interesting book. The photography in the book is spectacular. It is amazing how creative some people have become on decorating their door jambs. Here in South Florida, most doors are extremely boring.

Some of the doors featured are decorated with elaborate paintings, others have elaborate carvings, and yet others feature graffiti art. I think that one of my favorite doors had been painted as trompe l'oeil. The door itself looked like it was the wall with a window. Whereas, next to the door was an area of wall that had been painted to look like it had steps leading up to a door. It was exquisite.

Of course, there were doors that had just various windows in them. They were pretty, but nothing to savor in my opinion.

One other thing that was a minor nuisance was that instead of having where the door is located written on the bottom of each photograph, they have them listed in another section of the book entirely. So in order to find out that information, you spend your time flipping back and forth in the book. This can be rather cumbersome in an eBook. If you have a paper copy of the book, then this would not be as bad. Like I said, this is just a minor nuisance. It doesn't detract from the book at all.

Overall, this was a really interesting book featuring incredible photography. ( )
  wakela | Oct 7, 2013 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0764344919, Hardcover)

On this winding Door Tour, hitting every stop from hip Williamsburg to elegant Sutton Place, the soul of New York City is revealed through this most unlikely medium. The remarkable row house doors, warehouse gates, extravagant entryways, and even construction sites documented here represent the people, culture, and attitude of the City that Never Sleeps. From welcoming to ominous, brazen to bleak, astonishing portals can be found in quiet neighborhoods in Queens, graveyards in the Bronx, and small stores in Manhattan. More classically beautiful doors adorn the homes of some of the wealthiest and most powerful people in America. Gorgeous entrances to hotel lobbies lure you into luxurious interiors. In Brooklyn, graffiti artists turn industrial zones into studios, doors into canvases. Allan Markman opens the door to a visual jam session of urban architecture, but you must walk through it yourself.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:04:04 -0400)

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