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The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire…
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The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire {abridged by Mueller}

by Edward Gibbon

Other authors: Daniel J. Boorstin (Introduction), Hans-Friedrich Mueller (Editor)

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Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
No I have not read the whole thing. About a quarter of it. It features spectacular English and wonderful irony. It is long, but not boring by any means. I learned more about how religion operates in human society than any other place.

Gibbon also understands the character of the other folk who created our history.

Astonishing accomplishment.

Winston Churchill was said to have committed Chapter 14 to memory all his life (the one about Christianity). ( )
  Benedict8 | Jul 16, 2014 |
According to The Guardian, the book discusses how "moral decay made downfall inevitable"
  serrulatae | Mar 31, 2013 |
I have not read more than the occasional passage from this, nor do I really expect to. It's a big chunk of book, though, and it's an old enough edition that it smells lovely.
  JeremyPreacher | Mar 30, 2013 |
Oh god this book is dense. For every page I read, 300 years pass and fifteen emperors die. A nice come-down if you're feeling particularly self-important and focused. ( )
  rrriles | Apr 7, 2010 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Edward Gibbonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Boorstin, Daniel J.Introductionsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Mueller, Hans-FriedrichEditorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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This edition is an abridged version of the work, published by The Modern Library and edited and abridged by Hans-Friedrich Mueller. Please do not combine this abridged edition with the unabridged and "complete set" editions of the work.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0375758119, Paperback)

Edited, abridged, and with a critical Foreword by Hans-Friedrich Mueller
Introduction by Daniel J. Boorstin
Illustrations by Giovanni Battista Piranesi

Edward Gibbon’s masterpiece, which narrates the history of the Roman Empire from the second century A.D. to its collapse in the west in the fifth century and in the east in the fifteenth century, is widely considered the greatest work of history ever written. This abridgment retains the full scope of the original, but in a breadth comparable to a novel. Casual readers now have access to the full sweep of Gibbon’s narrative, while instructors and students have a volume that can be read in a single term. This unique edition emphasizes elements ignored in all other abridgments—in particular the role of religion in the empire and the rise of Islam.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:23:30 -0400)

Gibbon's masterpiece, which narrates the history of the Roman Empire from the second century A.D. to its collapse in the west in the fifth century and in the east in the fifteenth century, is widely considered the greatest work of history ever written. This abridgment retains the scope of the original, but in a compass equivalent to a long novel. Casual readers now have access to the full sweep of Gibbon's narrative, while instructors and students have a volume that can be read in a single term. This edition emphasizes elements ignored in all other abridgments--in particular the role of religion in the empire and the rise of Islam.--From publisher description.… (more)

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