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The Secret Message (Cold Fusion) by John…
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The Secret Message (Cold Fusion)

by John Townsend

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Recently added byMrBWaters, AdamjbRushton

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The book stands out from other World War One childrens books for its plot, split in time between WW1 and the present day, and the codes featured in the book. By having a contemporary narrator and codes to break, my boy seemed to feel quite involved in the story. And its merciful brevity allowed him to dispatch the book rather quickly, rather than letting it become a marathon to drop out of. Well worth a look. I paricularly enjoyed the poem featured in the story, although my son rushed through that!
  AdamjbRushton | Oct 11, 2013 |
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"In the attic of his house, Sam finds a leather case that belonged to his great great grandfather, Freddy Ovel. The case contains a diary, and as Sam begins to read it, he is taken right back to just before the First World War when Freddy was a boy. Sam also finds a photograph and discovers that at his age, Freddy was his exact double. The diary unlocks much more than just the events of the war. Sam discovers there is much more to 'Freddy' than meets the eye - not only heroic wartime deeds and terrible injuries, but also some very dark secrets."--Back cover.… (more)

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