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Open by David Price
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With the increasing abundance of information available on the Internet, the way we learn new things is changing in many ways. The author discusses many aspects of this revolution and how it affects business, schools and individuals. He discusses the conglomeration of information available in what he calls the Global Learning Commons, the acronyms SOFT (sharing, open, free and trust) and MOOC (Massive Open Online Courses) and other concepts. We find out about the shift from learning being delivered by a teacher to a more self controlled approach. The days of learning facts and following a static curriculum are numbered. According to the author, businesses and educational institutions are lagging in this transformation but there are gradual inroads being made. I found the book informative, although I was already aware of many of the concepts because the open learning environment is becoming more apparent everyday. The book is written from a British perspective and I would prefer more US examples, but the concepts are true worldwide.

I received a free copy of the book from librarything.com. ( )
  jwood652 | Oct 7, 2015 |
With the increasing abundance of information available on the Internet, the way we learn new things is changing in many ways. The author discusses many aspects of this revolution and how it affects business, schools and individuals. He discusses the conglomeration of information available in what he calls the Global Learning Commons, the acronyms SOFT (sharing, open, free and trust) and MOOC (Massive Open Online Courses) and other concepts. We find out about the shift from learning being delivered by a teacher to a more self controlled approach. The days of learning facts and following a static curriculum are numbered. According to the author, businesses and educational institutions are lagging in this transformation but there are gradual inroads being made. I found the book informative, although I was already aware of many of the concepts because the open learning environment is becoming more apparent everyday. The book is written from a British perspective and I would prefer more US examples, but the concepts are true worldwide.

I received a free copy of the book from librarything.com. ( )
  jwood652 | Oct 7, 2015 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
I am unable to fairly review this book as I was unable to finish it. It was more about the Open Education movement than about Open in general. It started well enough but the arguments seemed a bit long-winded to me.
1 vote gregandlarry | Sep 24, 2015 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
This book turned out to be quite interesting when I actually settled down to read it but despite this I found myself leaving big gaps between reading parts of it (and therefore forgetting what had gone before). The book is to do with 'open' rather than traditional learning, which does not separate learning from doing, and the chapters give examples of the relevance of this to different aspects of our lives. I suspect that in order to get a full picture of the author's ideas and arguments I ought to settle down and read it in a less disjointed fashion, but as that may be some time in the future am offering my overall impressions (of good but sometimes perhaps a bit wordy) now. ( )
  fancett | May 26, 2015 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
David Price has put together an eye opener in his discussion of the future of industry and education. As a consulting engineer, I was especially interested in the idea of free research time. We always had to account for every minute of time and show profit from our efforts, but it was often those after-hours bull sessions with peers that led to real innovation. As a pastor of a congregation with varied interests and gifts, I can see the biblical foundation for the commons philosophy that he carries throughout the book and will be looking for better ways to implement his suggestions. As the parent of an aspiring math teacher, I am very interested in his view of successful education in the future. And, finally, I found the historical and personal anecdotes to be worth the read, even for those who wouldn't be interested in the book for its technical value. I will be recommending this book to my friends and peers and making use of some of its passages as illustrations in my preaching. ( )
  SemoKiko | Mar 19, 2015 |
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