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Shark: A Visual History by Richard Ellis
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Shark: A Visual History

by Richard Ellis

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0762777974, Paperback)

“The sharks, ancient or modern, real or imaginary, have always been with us, and will probably remain with us forever. They appear not only in movies and literature, but in countless permutations of size, shape, and materials, permeating our daily lives with their silent menace. In a sense, humans live in a world replete with sharks, not vice-versa.”

 

Thus Richard Ellis sets about chronicling and debunking the myths of sharks throughout history. From 18th century art to the phenomena of JAWS, “the shark” has remained the indomitable aggressor of the deep, the last demon of humankind. The image of the shark and the fear it inspires infiltrates our daily lives with its mythical power and strength.  But it is not man who should fear the shark. Our need to dominate these predators is destroying them and their habitat. Through hundreds of full-color images Ellis proves the necessity of preserving these majestic creatures. As curator of the Ft. Lauderdale Museum of Art’s exhibition entitled “Shark”, debuting May 2012, Ellis adeptly turns these sleek, efficient hunters from monsters of the deep into rare, beautiful forces of nature.

 

 

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:23:48 -0400)

The image of the shark infiltrates our daily lives, from fighter planes to bedspreads, mascots to video games. They are even used as supposed cancer cures, and served as delicacies in shark-fin soup.

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