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Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal…
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Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal

by Margarita Engle

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Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
RGG: History in verse is appealing. Personification of nature destroyed. Imperial America destroying and making subservient indigenous people and people of color to expand wealth. Reading Interest: 10-14.
  rgruberexcel | Jan 17, 2017 |
RGG: History in verse is appealing. Personification of nature destroyed. Imperial America destroying and making subservient indigenous people and people of color to expand wealth. Reading Interest: 10-14.
  rgruberexcel | Jan 9, 2017 |
Through several voices speaking in poems, readers learn about the darker side of the construction of the Panama Canal. The workforce was blatantly segregated by skin color (those of European extraction were the "gold people" who earned more and had nice living quarters; the "silver people" were darker-skinned, earned far less, lived in substandard housing, and were subject to dangerous, even deadly working conditions. We hear the voices of the rain forest as well, most vividly the howler monkeys and the trees. They add a STEM aspect that rounds out a layered story of history, injustice, environment, engineering and conservation. ( )
  Salsabrarian | Feb 2, 2016 |
One hundred years ago, the world celebrated the opening of the Panama Canal, which connected the world’s two largest oceans and signaled America’s emergence as a global superpower. It was a miracle, this path of water where a mountain had stood—and creating a miracle is no easy thing. Thousands lost their lives, and those who survived worked under the harshest conditions for only a few silver coins a day.
  waltonlibrary | Jan 27, 2016 |
One hundred years ago, the world celebrated the opening of the Panama Canal, which connected the world’s two largest oceans and signaled America’s emergence as a global superpower. It was a miracle, this path of water where a mountain had stood—and creating a miracle is no easy thing. Thousands lost their lives, and those who survived worked under the harshest conditions for only a few silver coins a day.
  waltonlibrary | Jan 27, 2016 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Margarita Engleprimary authorall editionscalculated
Colon, RaulCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0544109414, Hardcover)

One hundred years ago, the world celebrated the opening of the Panama Canal, which connected the world’s two largest oceans and signaled America’s emergence as a global superpower. It was a miracle, this path of water where a mountain had stood—and creating a miracle is no easy thing. Thousands lost their lives, and those who survived worked under the harshest conditions for only a few silver coins a day.
   From the young "silver people" whose back-breaking labor built the Canal to the denizens of the endangered rainforest itself, this is the story of one of the largest and most difficult engineering projects ever undertaken, as only Newbery Honor-winning author Margarita Engle could tell it.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:14:26 -0400)

Fourteen-year-old Mateo and other Caribbean islanders face discrimination, segregation, and harsh working conditions when American recruiters lure them to the Panamanian rain forest in 1906 to build the great canal.

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