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En röd hjältinnas död by Xiaolong Qiu
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En röd hjältinnas död (original 2000; edition 2004)

by Xiaolong Qiu

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946539,201 (3.76)132
Member:cetera_desunt
Title:En röd hjältinnas död
Authors:Xiaolong Qiu
Info:Stockholm: Ordfront, 2004 453, [1] s. ; 18 cm [Ny utg.]
Collections:Your library, Allt annat
Rating:****
Tags:fiction, china, mystery, shanghai

Work details

Death of a Red Heroine by Xiaolong Qiu (2000)

  1. 01
    The Flower Net by Lisa See (cbl_tn)
    cbl_tn: These books have a similar setting and time period and will probably appeal to the same readers.
  2. 01
    Dream of the Red Chamber by Cao Xueqin (JuliaMaria)
    JuliaMaria: Klassiker der chinesischen Literatur. Wird gerne in den Romanen von Qiu Xiaolong zitiert. Ist das Lieblingsbuch der Frau des Assistenten von Inspector Chen. Unbedingt lesenswert - beide!
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English (46)  German (2)  Spanish (2)  French (1)  Swedish (1)  Italian (1)  English (53)
Showing 1-5 of 46 (next | show all)
This is the first book in a long time that's drawn me immediately into a mystery series and every way, where I've enjoyed nearly every moment and had a hard time putting the book down. Xiaolong's balance of atmosphere, character, and plotting was masterful, and I can't wait to read the next book in the series. I will say that there were moments where the quoting was a bit on the heavy side (and this, coming from a reader who loves poetry), but on the whole, it didn't at all interfere with how much I enjoyed the book since the quotes were generally only snippets of two or three lines. And, for this being the author's first novel, I really can't complain.

All told, there's no question that I'll be reading the next book in the series sooner than later. Whether looked at as a mystery or simply as a good read, there's a lot to love here, and I'd absolutely recommend it. ( )
  whitewavedarling | Nov 20, 2016 |
The world-building is much, much more interesting than the actual mystery. ( )
  gayla.bassham | Nov 7, 2016 |
A murder mystery in Shanghai. The body of a woman has been found in a little visited canal. The case is investigated by the Shanghai Burea of Police Special case squad, led by leader of the squad, Chief Inspector Chen and his administrative assistant Detective Yu Guangming.

The murder mystery frequently gets lost in the minutia of the explanation of the government of Shanghai in the 1990’s and the ruling communiist party. I forgot that this was a murder mystery but instead read this as a “fictionalized” history of Shanghai and it’s political commitment to China. Interesting. It will also be interesting where the next book in this series takes the reader. ( )
  Bettesbooks | Nov 3, 2016 |
Two old friends who haven't met for twenty years go fishing in a canal and discover the body of a young woman wrapped up in plastic. The case is assigned to Chief Inspector Chen Cao of the Shanghai Police and his lieutenant Detective Yu Guangming. Chen and Yu are informed that the case has political implications and so they are going to be advised by an older party cadre. From the beginning interference comes from every one of their political superiors. They assemble irrefutable evidence that the person responsible for the murder is an HCC (High Cadre Children) who is the son of a well known older party member. Even at that stage attempts are made to move them in a different direction. Both are assigned to new investigations and both seem to be in real danger of losing their jobs. Set in the critical early years of the transition of China from communism to capitalism everything is justified in terms of "for the sake of the Party". Chen and Yu get frustrated because they can't bring the murderer to justice.   This is the first book in the Inspector Chen Cao series, set in Shanghai in the 1990s. Chen Cao is a sensitive, poetry loving, yet tough-minded police inspector who wants to do a good job but is hamstrung by the rules he must live with. The Chinese setting gives the reader a mix of historical fiction and political/social observation. Chen is a wonderfully developed character and I liked him enough to purchase the next in the series, Loyal Character Dancer. " ( )
  Olivermagnus | Jun 16, 2016 |
On finishing this book, I closed it feeling satisfied. This is generally all I ask of a book, but if I think back, I also remember that it took a good 200 pages for this book to get rolling and for me to really become interested and vested in it.

Part of this is probably do to the fact that I only have a loose understanding of the events surrounding the Cultural Revolution and the subsequent Party politics that play an important part in this book. But it also just has a slow start, which isn't helped a lot by the rather dry tone Chinese literature always seems to have.

In the end, however, what I liked so much about the book is that it's about good men trying, against almost impossible odds, to be good men. I don't mean John McClane type heros, but ordinary men in extraordinary circumstances.

Chen, the main character is a coming to terms with the fact that his life has not turned out the way he hoped. He shows a consistent moral mettle that is impossible not to respect. His partner, Yu, is a man who was given very few choices in life but his dedication to both his job, doing the right thing and his wife are heart melting. It was these men and their character that carried the day for me. I'm glad to have read the book.
( )
  SadieSForsythe | Feb 24, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 46 (next | show all)
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Epigraph
Deep as the Peach Blossom Lake can be,
it is not so deep as the song you sing for me.
— Li Bai
Dedication
For Lijun
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The body was found at 4:40 P.M., on May 11, 1990, in Baili Canal, an out-of-the-way canal, about twenty miles to the west of Shanghai.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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In this Anthony Award-winning debut, Inspector Chen of the Shanghai Police must find the murderer of a National Model worker, and then risk his own life and career to see that justice is done.
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When the body of a prominent Communist Party member is found, Chief Inspector Chen is told to keep the party authorities informed about every lead. When his investigation leads him to the decadent offspring of high-ranking officials, he finds himself instantly removed from the case.… (more)

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