HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Authority by Jeff VanderMeer
Loading...

Authority

by Jeff VanderMeer

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The Southern Reach Trilogy (2)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
1,273798,951 (3.63)1 / 89
  1. 20
    Acceptance by Jeff VanderMeer (sturlington)
  2. 21
    Solaris by Stanisław Lem (Tuirgin)
    Tuirgin: Despite the concept of Area X being strikingly similar to the Strugatsky's Roadside Picnic, there are also echos of Stanisław Lem's Solaris—the idea of a type of communication so alien to human modes of communication that it can be harmful to us.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

Showing 1-5 of 76 (next | show all)
For the first half of the book, my major problem was that every time I read more than a few pages, I tended to fall asleep. It wasn't bad, but it certainly wasn't keeping me awake. Taking the eerie tone and looming sense of dread from the first volume and applying them to a workplace environment just didn't work for me. After snoozing through the book for several days, I slapped myself a few times and powered through the second half in a day. Fortunately, I was rewarded for my efforts with a build-up in the momentum of the book that lifted me past the early doldrums to a satisfactory conclusion that leaves me wanting to read the concluding volume soon. ( )
  villemezbrown | Jul 28, 2018 |
Authority is the second book in the Southern Reach trilogy. I’m still enjoying the series quite a bit.

This book is different from the first one, both in the way the story is told and in what it focuses on. The first book is pretty much all questions with no answers, and with no hints that you can really trust. This book didn’t provide many answers either, but the facts and hints it did provide felt more tangible, so I felt more like I had some basis for speculation about what was going on, and I was able to figure some things out before they were revealed.

I liked the difference in focus and perspective. As much as I enjoyed the first book, I might have gotten bored if it had been too much more of the same. There were a few sections here and there where I lost interest and had to push through, but it picked up again pretty fast. I look forward to seeing how things finish up in the last book. ( )
1 vote YouKneeK | Jul 4, 2018 |
Although this book is not as atmospheric as Annihilation it is still worth a read. It is quite a change of pace, setting and characters but adds another dimension to what we've found out in the first book. Not to the extent of actually explaining anything fully, but enough to keep you interested. ( )
  AlisonSakai | Jun 26, 2018 |
[b: Authority|22030734|Authority|R.K. Lilley|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1398992390s/22030734.jpg|41350852] was a worthy follow-up to [b: Annihilation|17934530|Annihilation (Southern Reach, #1)|Jeff VanderMeer|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1403941587s/17934530.jpg|24946895], something I wasn't entirely certain could be done.

Whereas [b: Annihilation|17934530|Annihilation (Southern Reach, #1)|Jeff VanderMeer|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1403941587s/17934530.jpg|24946895] brought us deep into Area X and the topographical anomaly that the twelfth expedition discovered there, [b: Authority|22030734|Authority|R.K. Lilley|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1398992390s/22030734.jpg|41350852] brings us into the inner workings of Southern Reach, and just how difficult it is to manage a team studying what is essentially resistant to study. Area X, whatever it might be, doesn't seem to wish to reveal all the scientists wish to know about it. What does one do in that situation? How does one describe what is essentially, by its very nature, indescribable?

[a: Jeff VanderMeer|33919|Jeff VanderMeer|https://images.gr-assets.com/authors/1400594878p2/33919.jpg] has created an interesting puzzle, and one that the longer you spend looking at it the more it changes and spirals upward towards your own mind. Like the best hermeneutics, the Southern Reach trilogy goes beyond what our language is capable of encompassing. It exists in some strange liminal state beyond it all. I'm grateful these books encompass just a sliver of the ideas possible to touch when discussing the implications of such a notion. The philosophy is deep, the writing taut, and the horror as sharp as a knife-point.

Why not dive on in? ( )
1 vote Lepophagus | Jun 14, 2018 |
In my review of the first book of the Southern Reach trilogy, 'Annihilation', I commented on the various influences I saw in the text, and added "with a big dollop of Kafka". Well, this novel changes the focus, and can best be described as a mix of Kafka and le Carré.

A new director arrives at the headquarters of Southern Reach, with a remit to try to understand what happened to the Twelfth Expedition, unearth the motivations of his predecessor and to bring the organisation back under some sort of control. Indeed, in a nod to le Carré, this character refers to himself as 'Control' nearly all the way through the book. He is thwarted by his new colleagues, who are by turns insubordinate, enigmatic, obstructive and incomprehensible. Even on the occasions that they try to be helpful, Control finds that their actions can defy understanding.

Control also has the opportunity to debrief the biologist, protagonist of 'Annihilation'. This process is just as problematical; she is given to announcing that she "is not the biologist", though whether that means that there is a question of identity, a matter of the role that she is expected to fulfil, or indeed of her own self-understanding is open to question.

Control's own role is also not necessarily what it seems. His past comes back to haunt him; is he his own agent in this investigation, or is he a pawn in the hands of others?

We learn some more of the history of Area X; but then events begin to spiral out of Control's control and he has to strike out on his own and disregard his orders.

This is a dense and complex read, though not without some amusement at Vandermeer's wordplay. It is utterly unlike the previous book, and yet follows on so naturally. It is a slow burn of a novel, and certainly will not be to every reader's taste. And although we see more of the world outside Area X, and Control's interaction with it, it still reads as though Area X and the Southern Reach could be anywhere. The story ends on a cliff-hanger; it will be interesting to see where the final volume, 'Acceptance', takes us. ( )
1 vote RobertDay | Jun 13, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 76 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jeff VanderMeerprimary authorall editionscalculated
Aaltonen, EinariTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Blomeyer, MarionCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kellner, MichaelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nyquist, EricCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Strick, CharlotteCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
For Ann
First words
In Control's dreams it is early morning, the sky deep blue with just a twinge of light.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0374104107, Paperback)

In the second volume of the Southern Reach Trilogy, questions are answered, stakes are raised, and mysteries are deepened . . .

In Annihilation, Jeff VanderMeer introduced Area X—a remote and lush terrain mysteriously sequestered from civilization. This was the first volume of a projected trilogy; well in advance of publication, translation rights had already sold around the world and a major movie deal had been struck.
     Just months later, Authority, the second volume, is here. For thirty years, the only human engagement with Area X has taken the form of a series of expeditions monitored by a secret agency called the Southern Reach. After the disastrous twelfth expedition chronicled in Annihilation, the Southern Reach is in disarray, and John Rodriguez, aka “Control,” is the team’s newly appointed head. From a series of interrogations, a cache of hidden notes, and hours of profoundly troubling video footage, the secrets of Area X begin to reveal themselves—and what they expose pushes Control to confront disturbing truths about both himself and the agency he’s promised to serve. And the consequences will spread much further than that.
     The Southern Reach trilogy will conclude in fall 2014 with Acceptance.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:19:49 -0400)

"In the second volume of the Southern Reach Trilogy, questions are answered, stakes are raised, and mysteries are deepened. In Annihilation, Jeff VanderMeer introduced Area X--a remote and lush terrain mysteriously sequestered from civilization. This was the first volume of a projected trilogy; well in advance of publication, translation rights had already sold around the world and a major movie deal had been struck. Just months later, Authority, the second volume, is here. For thirty years, the only human engagement with Area X has taken the form of a series of expeditions monitored by a secret agency called the Southern Reach. After the disastrous twelfth expedition chronicled in Annihilation, the Southern Reach is in disarray, and John Rodriguez, aka "Control," is the team's newly appointed head. From a series of interrogations, a cache of hidden notes, and hours of profoundly troubling video footage, the secrets of Area X begin to reveal themselves--and what they expose pushes Control to confront disturbing truths about both himself and the agency he's promised to serve. And the consequences will spread much further than that. The Southern Reach trilogy will conclude in fall 2014 with Acceptance"-- "In the second volume of the Southern Reach trilogy, Area X's most troubling questions are answered... but the answers are far from reassuring"--… (more)

» see all 7 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.63)
0.5 1
1 8
1.5 4
2 33
2.5 2
3 121
3.5 48
4 181
4.5 19
5 63

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 128,111,215 books! | Top bar: Always visible