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Jacqueline Du Pre by Carol Easton
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Jacqueline Du Pre (original 1989; edition 1990)

by Carol Easton

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451256,992 (3.75)4
Member:justjim
Title:Jacqueline Du Pre
Authors:Carol Easton
Info:Summit Books (1990), Hardcover
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:Biography, Artist, Musician, Cellist, Cello

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Jacqueline Du Pre by Carol Easton (1989)

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This biography takes a respectful position towards Ms du Pre's music, her private life and (oddly enough) the reader. Easton came to know Ms du Pre after she had given up performing and they were apparently working on this biography together at that time, before her tragic early death. The story of an extraordinary talent is told without an excess of hyperbole, just as it was related to Easton by Ms du Pre and her friends.

There are allusions to issues with her family and private life and without minimising them, Easton manages to give them some perspective. In the end you get the sense that, for all of the imperfections in her private life, Ms du Pre actually coped fairly well - no worse and perhaps better than many of us. The remarkable thing is that she was able to preserve and develop that talent, and Easton does a very creditable job of sharing the feeling of performance, the playing, the mechanics of tour bookings and the effect on the public and critics.

In fact Easton's real achievement here is to produce a musical and a personal biography that is readable and informative, and moving without descending into an excess of sentimentality. Which is the essence of that respect towards the reader I mentioned earlier. The author presents a life to the reader honestly and without adornment, acknowledging the limitations of how much we will ever know about a subject, but saying "Here is a story of a life, I have done my best to tell it for you."

Very highly recommended, and to the accompaniment of some of those recordings of Ms du Pre's performances on the cello, or indeed all them. A precious gift that wasn't wasted. ( )
  nandadevi | May 14, 2012 |
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Epigraph
… Lest the brain forget the thunder

The roused heart once made it hear, –

Rising as that clamor fell, –

Let there sound from music's root

One note rage can understand,

A fine noise of riven things.

Build there some thick chord of wonder;

Then, for every passion's sake,

Beat upon it till it break.

—Louise Bogan, “Sub Contra”
Dedication
Sommer, Alice (This book is for Alice Sommer)
First words
At the age of three, Jacqueline du Pré set off on her tricycle one morning and was not seen again until nightfall, when the police returned her, quite unperturbed, to her frantic mother.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0306809761, Paperback)

Carol Easton, who knew Jacqueline du Pré well, draws on this friendship to create a moving and insightful portrait of a singularly complex person. Jacqueline du Pré (the subject of the recent film Hilary and Jackie) was the music world's "golden girl," with what appeared to many to be a fairytale career and storybook marriage to Daniel Barenboim. But away from her cello, du Pré was achingly human. As a child, she was isolated by her phenomenal talent. As an adult, she was confined to the rarefied, insular concert world. And during the last fifteen years of her life, she lived in the inexorably shrinking world of the invalid, as multiple sclerosis took its toll. The Baltimore Sun said, Carol Easton tells this extraordinary story "with feeling befitting du Pré's own."

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:44:51 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

"Jacqueline du Pre was the music world's "golden girl," with what appeared to many to be a fairytale career and storybook marriage to Daniel Barenboim; but away from her cello, du Pre was achingly human. As a child, she was isolated by her phenomenal talent. As an adult, she was confined to the rarefied, insular concert world. And during the last fifteen years of her life, she lived in the inexorably shrinking world of the invalid, as multiple sclerosis slowly took its toll until her death in 1987."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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