HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Fourteenth Goldfish by Jennifer Holm
Loading...

The Fourteenth Goldfish

by Jennifer Holm

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
469251,994 (3.75)2
None

None

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 2 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
Ellie isn't very excited about changing schools especially when her BFF starts to branch out to the volleyball team and seems to forget all about her. Then a weird grumpy boy shows up and Ellie finds out that it is her grandfather, and he has invented an age reversing formula. He'll need her help to access the source of the fountain of youth however, and that's when things get interesting. An easy fast read. ( )
  JRlibrary | Aug 29, 2014 |
Having a very hard time figuring out the rapturous love this book has received. It is rather well-written, yes, and it's funny. The tiniest details were a nice touch. But the plot was... there wasn't much of one, and Ellie's characterization was awkward. The ending had nice parts, but certain pieces of it made no sense. All in all I'm not convinced this is coming anywhere near shiny Newbery stickers, but for the right kid I could see it being a nice book regardless. ( )
  kimby365 | Aug 15, 2014 |
This review and others posted over at my blog

I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Blurb from NetGalley: "Science can change the world...but can it go too far? Eleven-year-old Ellie has never liked change. She misses fifth grade. She misses her old best friend. She even misses her dearly departed goldfish. Then one day a strange boy shows up. He's bossy. He's cranky. And weirdly enough he looks a lot like Ellie's grandfather, a scientist who's always been slightly obsessed with immortality. Could this pimply boy really be Grandpa Melvin? Has he finally found the secret to eternal youth?"

This was a cute book - I read it all in one sitting and I would guess it would be just as engrossing for the target audience (grades 5-7 according to Amazon). This book was easy to understand, yet threaded the science facts throughout, making them part of Ellie's discoveries and newfound interest in science, rather than just throwing facts at kids for the sake of some educational value. Turning 12, Ellie is also entering middle school and starting to deal with the difficulties that come along with that. Teenage years are awkward and can be hard to handle, but so can the pre-teen years. Oftentimes that's when people really start to develop more of their personality, or go through phases to figure out how they want to dress, what their interests are, and it's the start of self discovery. The Fourteenth Goldfish touches base on this topic a little with the changing relationship between Ellie and her old best friend. Children have to be aware that at some point, people may change and your friendships might not last forever - yet you make new friends along the way and this book shows that with Ellie's newfound friendship with Raj and even the mysterious boy.

I had a little confusion was about Raj, Ellie's new friend, as he was an alternative boy with facial and ear piercings (and possibly a shaved head), but I have a hard time imagining a 12-year-old with a lip ring. Even if he's older, if he's not in high school yet he's probably not older than 14. I can almost picture a 14-year-old with lip and eyebrow piercings, but not really. I also thought the ending was a little abrupt...MINOR SPOILER...because the solution for part of the issue was to flush the cause of an amazing scientific discovery down the toilet and I couldn't imagine this happening.

I assume this is the start of what could be an excellent middle-grade series based on a female protagonist interested in science. If you know any young science fans, they should certainly check this out! Even if you're just a fan of middle-grade fiction, at a little over 200 pages this is easily worth your time. ( )
  MillieHennessy | Aug 11, 2014 |
The Fourteenth Goldfish provides a lighthearted setting for a look at how science can be used for good or ill, and how some discoveries hold the potential for both. The characters are well developed for the reading level and length, and the plot fast-paced enough that this would be a good offering for a reluctant reader. ( )
  kgriffith | Aug 8, 2014 |
Wow! A great book about the cycle of life, the importance of family and friends, and possibilities. I love that the MC is a girl interested in science. And that she not only learns a few things from her grandfather, but teaches him some things in return. Witty and fun, recommended to all.

Net Galley Feedback ( )
  LibStaff2 | Jul 20, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0375870644, Hardcover)

Believe in the possible . . . with this brilliantly quirky, thought-provoking novel from New York Times bestseller, three-time Newbery Honor winner Jennifer L. Holm
 
Galileo. Newton. Salk. Oppenheimer.
Science can change the world . . . but can it go too far?
 
Eleven-year-old Ellie has never liked change. She misses fifth grade. She misses her old best friend. She even misses her dearly departed goldfish. Then one day a strange boy shows up. He’s bossy. He’s cranky. And weirdly enough . . . he looks a lot like Ellie’s grandfather, a scientist who’s always been slightly obsessed with immortality. Could this pimply boy really be Grandpa Melvin? Has he finally found the secret to eternal youth?
 
With a lighthearted touch and plenty of humor, Jennifer Holm celebrates the wonder of science and explores fascinating questions about life and death, family and friendship, immortality . . . and possibility.

(retrieved from Amazon Sun, 22 Dec 2013 13:33:37 -0500)

Ellie's scientist grandfather has discovered a way to reverse aging, and consequently has turned into a teenager--which makes for complicated relationships when he moves in with Ellie and her mother, his daughter.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
1 pay1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.75)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5 1
3 3
3.5 2
4 6
4.5
5 2

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 92,672,242 books! | Top bar: Always visible