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Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley and Livingstone (original 2003; edition 2004)

by Martin Dugard

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3951027,097 (4.11)10
Member:ecurb
Title:Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley and Livingstone
Authors:Martin Dugard
Info:Broadway (2004), Paperback, 368 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****1/2
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Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley & Livingstone by Martin Dugard (2003)

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Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
Joy's review: A jolly good read! Amazing adventures, incredible hardships and fantastic journeys... I can't begin to fathom how they endured the physical hardships that these journeys put upon them. It's also hard to comprehend the drive of these explorers trying to be the first to definitively identify the source of the Nile. I'd recommend this book to just about anyone. ( )
  konastories | Jan 28, 2014 |
Martin Dugard's "Into Africa: The Epic Adventures of Stanley and Livingstone" tells the story behind what is arguably one of the most well-known quotes from an explorer: "Dr. Livingstone, I presume? (perhaps only outdone by Edmund Hilary's "Because it is there.")

The book gives a good overview of Dr. David Livingstone's efforts to find the source of the Nile and Henry Morton Stanley's efforts to find Livingstone. I've read Stanley's book on his exploration of Africa (which came after finding Livingstone) but this book really gave me a totally different view of his character. Dugard's book describes him as racist, ambitious and frankly patently unlikeable.

I enjoyed the book's story and the way Dugard wove the journeys of the two men together. The book suffers a bit from Dugard's sort of breathless, excited way of describing even mundane scenes, but it also makes it clear that Dugard clearly enjoyed all of the research that went into it. A good, solid book that made for an interesting read. ( )
  amerynth | Nov 30, 2012 |
Actually, my rating of this book speaks more to the subject matter than the author's writing ability. Being historically based, the novel is as dark as the truth. I always thought that Dr Livingston was a medical missionary and that Stanley went to find him to join his work. Turns out the truth is racist, cruel, mean, self-indulgent, and self-promoting. I did not enjoy the book for those very reasons. However, I do believe that Martin Dugard did an excellent job of research, and produced a well written account of the life and time of these men. It seems to be a true representation of their dark, cruel adventures/fate. As much as I disliked the dark truth on which the book is based, I was up late at night reading - enthralled by the story. ( )
  SusanBarnard | Aug 5, 2011 |
I'd give this book a 3.5 if I could but would hesitate to go higher because my memory of the book doesn't give me enough mental ammunition to have a meaninful conversation about the relationship between [a:Richard Francis Burton|4197526|Richard Francis Burton|http://www.goodreads.com/images/nophoto/nophoto-U-50x66.jpg](19 March 1821 – 20 October 1890) and [a:David Livingstone|211925|David Livingstone|http://www.goodreads.com/images/nophoto/nophoto-U-50x66.jpg] (19 March 1813–1 May 1873) . I had a coversation about them earlier this summer (2010) during which we wondered about Burton and Livingstone and whether and how often they met in person? Livingstone was in Africa between 1941-1856 (starting in S. Africa) first as a missionary, later as an explorer. Burton was in India and Arabia during Livingstone's early years on the continent and their paths likely had little reason to cross during these years. Yet, I am curious about whether during Burton's subsequent time in Africa, or whether in England his path overlapped much with Livingstone's and what their relationship was like? Livingstone in his journals describes Burton's manner and his supporters with some personal distate that is unsurprising when you consider Livingstone was a missionary and Burton went on to 'translate' the [b:The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana|9184440|The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana|Richard Burton|http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61OwMygMqjL._SL75_.jpg|14063784] and other volumes of what were considered erotica in his day. Livingstone left Africa for England in 1856 where he wrote a memoir of his African experience published in 1857 as [b:Missionary Travels And Researches In South Africa - David Livingstone|8156013|Missionary Travels And Researches In South Africa - David Livingstone|David Livingstone|http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41VRoW9-qsL._SL75_.jpg|12994358], which makes him famous. It seems Livingstone could have/should have met Burton at the Geographical Society during the years 1864-65 or at the meeting of the British Association in Fall 1864 where Livingstone planned to speak? Burton and one-time expedition member (now rival) John Hanning Speke were famously due to debate the issue of the source of the Nile at the annual meeting that year in Bath on September16, 1864. The day before the planned debate, Burton and Speke sat near each other in a lecture hall. According to Burton's wife, Speke said "I can't stand this any longer," and left the hall. The next day, Burton received news that Speke had killed himself in a hunting accient after leaving the lecture hall. Burton did not speak as planned. Livingstone would later attend Speke's funeral, Burton did not. ( )
  nkmunn | Nov 12, 2010 |
When Livingstone died he had malaria, anemia, hookworm, dystenary and an enormous bloodclot. he was 60 and had been wandering Africa for 8 years (on this journey). On a previous journey his wife missed him, came to Africa to be with him but died of malaria. He hardly knew his children. A driven personality, suffering so much to find the Source of the Nile (unsuccessfully, we had to wait for sateliite technology to find it). Stanley was also a determined man, but a different motive - a journalist looking for the scoop.
The story set against the background of African colonialism, the slave trade and environmental extremes was fascinating. ( )
  siri51 | Aug 23, 2010 |
Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
“Doctor Livingstone, I presume?”

Thus concluded a two year journey through jungles, deserts and battlefields in east Africa in 1871. In a different way, that famous greeting concluded an era of African history, and marked the beginning of the period of European colonialism. It’s a neat fulcrum in geopolitical history, but its immediate significance to the Arab and African witnesses was mostly seeing two white men in the same village.

Henry Morton Stanley’s greeting of the long-lost British explorer David Livingstone changed European thinking about Africa. What was once the land of impossible danger now became the land of opportunity. Stanley’s American flag also stirred the pot of European tribal jealousies, leading to a competitive atmosphere among the kings and princes in Europe.

Even at the height of the slave trade, Europeans rarely ventured into the African back-country, preferring instead to buy slaves right on the coast. All the same, the slave trade was a social earthquake throughout Africa. The crack cocaine of its day, slave-trading brought incredible sums of money for very little work to minor kings and chiefs in the backcountry, and over the course of a few centuries, entire civilizations were depopulated of their brightest and best. . . .

Into Africa tells the story of Stanley’s quest to find Livingstone. It was the most famous story of its day, but the details have been largely forgotten today. But author Martin Dugard doesn’t put two white actors against a backdrop of mute and stupid black extras. He places them into a living, breathing world of real people – fighters and lovers, scoundrels and saints. It’s a great read and an eye-opening story.

 

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Martin Dugardprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Cain, DavidMap Designersecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Carella, MariaBook Designersecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
"We also rejoice in our sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope - and hope does not disappoint us."
-Romans 5:3-5
Dedication
To Calene with love
First words
Twenty five years to the day after first setting foot in Africa, and just four days before his fifty-third birthday, David Livingstone was holed up in a small house on the island of Zanzibar, waiting for a ship to take him back to his beloved continent.
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Haiku summary
Source of Nile not known
Livingstone searched then vanished
Stanley finds Doctor
(islanddave)

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0767910745, Paperback)

With the utterance of a single line—“Doctor Livingstone, I presume?”—a remote meeting in the heart of Africa was transformed into one of the most famous encounters in exploration history. But the true story behind Dr. David Livingstone and journalist Henry Morton Stanley is one that has escaped telling. Into Africa is an extraordinarily researched account of a thrilling adventure—defined by alarming foolishness, intense courage, and raw human achievement.

In the mid-1860s, exploration had reached a plateau. The seas and continents had been mapped, the globe circumnavigated. Yet one vexing puzzle remained unsolved: what was the source of the mighty Nile river? Aiming to settle the mystery once and for all, Great Britain called upon its legendary explorer, Dr. David Livingstone, who had spent years in Africa as a missionary. In March 1866, Livingstone steered a massive expedition into the heart of Africa. In his path lay nearly impenetrable, uncharted terrain, hostile cannibals, and deadly predators. Within weeks, the explorer had vanished without a trace. Years passed with no word.

While debate raged in England over whether Livingstone could be found—or rescued—from a place as daunting as Africa, James Gordon Bennett, Jr., the brash American newspaper tycoon, hatched a plan to capitalize on the world’s fascination with the missing legend. He would send a young journalist, Henry Morton Stanley, into Africa to search for Livingstone. A drifter with great ambition, but little success to show for it, Stanley undertook his assignment with gusto, filing reports that would one day captivate readers and dominate the front page of the New York Herald.

Tracing the amazing journeys of Livingstone and Stanley in alternating chapters, author Martin Dugard captures with breathtaking immediacy the perils and challenges these men faced. Woven into the narrative, Dugard tells an equally compelling story of the remarkable transformation that occurred over the course of nine years, as Stanley rose in power and prominence and Livingstone found himself alone and in mortal danger. The first book to draw on modern research and to explore the combination of adventure, politics, and larger-than-life personalities involved, Into Africa is a riveting read.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:58:54 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

"In the mid-1860s, exploration had reached a plateau. The seas and continents had been mapped, the globe circumnavigated. Yet one vexing puzzle remained unsolved: What was the source of the mighty Nile River? Aiming to settle the mystery once and for all, Great Britain called upon its legendary explorer, Dr. David Livingstone, who had spent years in Africa as a missionary. In March 1866, Livingstone steered a massive expedition into the heart of Africa. In his path lay nearly impenetrable, unchartered terrain, hostile cannibals, and deadly predators. Within weeks, the explorer had vanished without a trace. Years passed with no word." "While debate raged in England over whether Livingstone could be found - or rescued - from a place as daunting as Africa, James Gordon Bennett, Jr., the brash American newspaper tycoon, hatched a plan to capitalize on the world's fascination with the missing legend. He would send a young journalist, Henry Morton Stanley, into Africa to search for Livingstone. A drifter with great ambition, but little success to show for it, Stanley undertook his assignment with gusto, filing reports that would one day captivate readers and dominate the front page of the New York Herald." "Tracing the amazing journeys of Livingstone and Stanley in alternating chapters, author Martin Dugard captures the perils and challenges these men faced. Dugard weaves into the narrative the remarkable transformation that occurred over the course of nine years, as Stanley rose in power and prominence and Livingstone found himself alone and in mortal danger."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

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