HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Train: Riding the Rails That Created the…
Loading...

Train: Riding the Rails That Created the Modern World--from the…

by Tom Zoellner

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
884137,094 (4.19)1
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 1 mention

Showing 4 of 4
If you love trains and/or are fascinated about them, you'll enjoy this book that reviews a brief history of the development of trains in Europe, South America, India, China, Russia, and the U.S. Some great discussion of the collapse of trains (for passenger travel) in the U.S., the weak support for Amtrak, and the lack of development of high-speed train travel -- unlike in other countries in which governments have made huge investments in bullet trains. A fun and informative ride... err, read. ( )
  Randall.Hansen | Jun 16, 2015 |
A very pleasant re-reading of a charmer of a book. It felt like the author and I - the reader - were undertaking the journeys together. Great, readable prose- this is what books are supposed to do!

Do find it and enjoy it!
  John_Vaughan | Apr 7, 2015 |
Some interesting highlights but nothing astounding. ( )
  jimwva | Dec 21, 2014 |
I thororoughly enjoyed this book. Like Theroux, Zoellner takes a series of train rides around the world. He engages with his fellow travellers, but unlike Theroux he goes deeper into the egineering and development of railroads. The writing is top notch. There is a significant editing glitch. On a southwestern train ride to LA, Zoellner wakes up in the San Bernardino train station, and then proceeds over the Cajon Summit to LA. In fact San Bernardino is below thw Cajon summit. This is a surprising error given that Zoellner teaches in LA. ( )
  nemoman | Jun 26, 2014 |
Showing 4 of 4
One of the many things to be learned from this entirely terrific book is that people who actually work on railroads are not exactly enamored of amateurs who are bonkers about trains. These are “hard-core train fanatics — middle-aged or elderly men mostly — who call themselves ‘railfans’ but whom Amtrak conductors call ‘foamers,’ as in one whose mouth starts to foam at the sight of a locomotive.” Tom Zoellner writes: “The term is not charitable, and most Amtrak employees regard them as nuisances. Railroad crossing signs and engineer caps decorate countless workshops across America.
 
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0670025283, Hardcover)

A revelatory, entertaining account of the world’s most indispensable mode of transportation

Tom Zoellner loves trains with a ferocious passion. In his new book he chronicles the innovation and sociological impact of the railway technology that changed the world, and could very well change it again.

From the frigid trans-Siberian railroad to the antiquated Indian Railways to the futuristic MagLev trains, Zoellner offers a stirring story of man’s relationship with trains. Zoellner examines both the mechanics of the rails and their engines and how they helped societies evolve. Not only do trains transport people and goods in an efficient manner, but they also reduce pollution and dependency upon oil. Zoellner also considers America’s culture of ambivalence to mass transit, using the perpetually stalled line between Los Angeles and San Francisco as a case study in bureaucracy and public indifference.

Train presents both an entertaining history of railway travel around the world while offering a serious and impassioned case for the future of train travel.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:21:46 -0400)

"A revelatory, entertaining account of the world's most indispensable mode of transportation Tom Zoellner loves trains with a ferocious passion. In his new book he chronicles the innovation and sociological impact of the railway technology that changed the world, and could very well change it again. From the frigid trans-Siberian railroad to the antiquated Indian Railways to the futuristic MagLev trains, Zoellner offers a stirring story of man's relationship with trains. Zoellner examines both the mechanics of the rails and their engines and how they helped societies evolve. Not only do trains transport people and goods in an efficient manner, but they also reduce pollution and dependency upon oil. Zoellner also considers America's culture of ambivalence to mass transit, using the perpetually stalled line between Los Angeles and San Francisco as a case study in bureaucracy and public indifference. Train presents both an entertaining history of railway travel around the world while offering a serious and impassioned case for the future of train travel"--… (more)

» see all 3 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.19)
0.5
1
1.5 1
2
2.5
3 1
3.5
4 4
4.5 2
5 5

Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 126,543,931 books! | Top bar: Always visible