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Notes from the Internet Apocalypse: A Novel…
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Notes from the Internet Apocalypse: A Novel

by Wayne Gladstone

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Satirical, full of geeky jokes, and heart-wrenching. I smiled or flat out laughed through most of the book. Then questioned my life at the end. Yet still I raced to GoodReads to throw out some random comments about what I thought, to an invisible audience.

Well played Mr Gladstone, well played. ( )
  reneeg | Oct 23, 2015 |
I put this book down so many times, for extended periods (i.e. weeks and month), which for me, is indicative of my (negative) feelings toward a book.

Notes from the Internet Apocalypse centers around a main character, with the same name as the author, in a world where the internet has gone offline and the people are trying to cope. Gladstone (the character) lives in New York and teams up with a weed-loving blogger friend and an Aussie webcam girl to find the internet and return it to the people. It seems like it would be an interesting, albeit extreme, depiction of the possible mania the loss of the internet would cause in our current technology-dependent society.

I had no previous knowledge of the author, or his work on Cracked.com. The story was confusing and extreme and stereotypical most of the time. Then the end tries for deep and powerful, but just adds to the confusion. It's as if the Gladstone (the author) was having a great time writing about men masturbating in closets and wearing fedoras un-ironically for the whole of the novel, then decided to handle the apparent manic depression of his main character in the last 5 pages. It didn't work. It made no sense. ( )
  CarleyShea | Mar 3, 2015 |
Rating: 3* of five

The Publisher Says:When the Internet suddenly stops working, society reels from the loss of flowing data, instant messages, and streaming entertainment. Addicts wander the streets, talking to themselves in 140 characters or forcing cats to perform tricks for their amusement, while the truly desperate pin their requests for casual encounters on public bulletin boards. The economy tumbles further and the government passes the draconian NET Recovery Act.

For Gladstone, the Net's disappearance comes particularly hard following the loss of his wife, leaving his flask of Jamesons and grandfather’s fedora as the only comforts in his Brooklyn apartment. But there are rumors that someone in New York is still online. Someone set apart from this new world where Facebook flirters "poke" each other in real life and members of Anonymous trade memes at secret parties. Where a former librarian can sell information as a human search engine, and the perverted fulfill their secret fetishes at the blossoming Rule 34 club. With the help of his friends, a blogger and a webcam girl both now out of work, Gladstone sets off to find the Internet. But is he the right man to save humanity from this Apocalypse?

For fans of David Wong, Chad Kultgen, and Chuck Palahniuk, Wayne Gladstone’s Notes from the Internet Apocalypse examines the question “What is life without the Web?”

My Review: When I was a teen, something Amazing happened to me and my generation. My drama-fag friends and I, at various peoples' houses, spent every Saturday night watching The Funniest Show Ever Made: Saturday Night Live!! Brand new, unprecedented, unlike anything else ever!!!!!!!! (Remember we were adolescents. Caps and exclams and complete lack of perspective were then, as they are now, de rigueur.)

One Saturday night, I couldn't go to whoever's house to watch that week's episode for some reason. I made my mother, at the time 55, watch it with me by promising it would be Hilarious, Momentous, Life-Changing!!!! She, faithless to the dour brand of nutsoid Protestant Puritanism she'd taken to supporting, agreed and watched the whole thing.

I howled! I clapped! I bopped along with the musical guest and Supergenius G.E. Smith! And, as the credits ran, I turned to Mama and demanded, "wasn't that the funniest thing ever?!" She smiled at me and delivered the most withering possible response: "It was indeed! Imogene Coca and Sid Caesar were hilarious in the first sketch, and Jack Benny and Rochester were perfect in that second one."

That is precisely how I feel now: This book was right funny indeed, back when Peter de Vries did the social satire in 1965, and Thorne Smith did the smutty bits in 1935. And damn me if I didn't see Trudeau's Zonker Harris from 1975 somewhere in there.

There is nothing new under the sun, chick-a-biddies, and when enough sunrises have awakened one, there's a distinct lack of surprise in shock humor and topical tropism. Those over 40 are strongly discouraged from reading this book; those over 30 reminded to expect smiles not guffaws.


This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. ( )
4 vote richardderus | Aug 10, 2014 |
I can only handle so many pointless, juvenile blow job jokes, and I reached my quota half way through the book and stopped reading.

The fact that I endured enough stupid sex humor to make it half way through the book is a testament to how good some of the satire is. There are a few delightful gems in this book (such as an anarchist wearing a t-shirt depicting Che Guevara in a Guy Fawkes mask), and it definitely has a lot to say about our society's addiction to the internet.... But it reads like a drunk frat boy (or maybe a young teenage boy who has just discovered porn for the first time) wrote the book over the course of a weekend without really thinking it through.

I was especially peeved by the book's total lack of understanding (or willful denial) of how the internet works. The protagonists spend the book looking for the internet, as if it is a physical object. With a little more thought, surely Gladstone could have come up with something more realistic. Then again, judging by the pervasive immature humor, maybe he couldn't have. ( )
1 vote Gwendydd | Jun 18, 2014 |
Notes from the Internet Apocalypse is completely unlike the usual books I read, which are mostly Fantasy and Science Fiction. I decided to give it a try because I really am an internet nut. I spend a considerable amount online socializing with internet friends and working on a book blog.

So that is what really drew me to this book, the fact that there was a blogger because hey I'm a blogger, and the curiosity about what might happen should all of a sudden the internet met its end. It wasn't just that though, but also how stuck some of us have become in non physical interaction almost to the point where its awkward to have contact with people any other way. I can really sympathize on that point since I also work from home. Given all of that I found this very oddly appealing.

It's funny that the main character is also named Gladstone. This was a quirky and at times dark book on what could possibly come about should we really lose the internet. I obviously haven't seen the shall we say darker side of the internet but here you'll get to see it - so it could be a bit of an eye opener. I'm of the opinion that anything imaginable could very well happen and I found a lot of the geek pop culture references entertaining. More importantly though the book was at times very touching - I like it when a book can tickle my emotions. Notes from the Internet Apocalypse was well worth venturing outside of my comfort zone for. ( )
  Pabkins | May 2, 2014 |
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When the Internet suddenly stops working, society reels from the loss of flowing data and streaming entertainment. Addicts wander the streets talking to themselves in 140 characters or forcing cats to perform tricks for their amusement, while the truly desperate pin their requests for casual encounters on public bulletin boards. The economy tumbles and the government passes the draconian NET Recovery Act.

For Gladstone, the Net’s disappearance comes particularly hard, following the loss of his wife, leaving his flask of Jamesons and grandfather’s fedora as the only comforts in his Brooklyn apartment. But there are rumors that someone in New York is still online. Someone set apart from this new world where Facebook flirters "poke" each other in real life and members of Anonymous trade memes at secret parties. Where a former librarian can sell information as a human search engine and the perverted fulfill their secret fetishes at the blossoming Rule 34 club. With the help of his friends---a blogger and a webcam girl, both now out of work---Gladstone sets off to find the Internet. But is he the right man to save humanity from this Apocalypse?

For those of you wondering if you have WiFi right now, Wayne Gladstone’s Notes from the Internet Apocalypse examines the question "What is life without the Web?"

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"When the Internet suddenly stops working, society reels from the loss of flowing data, instant messages, and streaming entertainment. Addicts wander the streets, talking to themselves in 140 characters or forcing cats to perform tricks for their amusement, while the truly desperate pin their requests for casual encounters on public bulletin boards. The economy tumbles further and the government passes the draconian NET Recovery Act. For Gladstone, the Net's disappearance comes particularly hard following the loss of his wife, leaving his flask of Jamesons and grandfather's fedora as the only comforts in his Brooklyn apartment. But there are rumors that someone in New York is still online. Someone set apart from this new world where Facebook flirters "poke" each other in real life and members of Anonymous trade memes at secret parties. Where a former librarian can sell information as a human search engine, and the perverted fulfill their secret fetishes at the blossoming Rule 34 club. With the help of his friends, a blogger and a webcam girl both now out of work, Gladstone sets off to find the Internet. But is he the right man to save humanity from this Apocalypse? For fans of David Wong, Chad Kultgen, and Chuck Palahniuk, Wayne Gladstone's Notes from the Internet Apocalypse examines the question "What is life without the Web?""--… (more)

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