HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Arrr! (Celebrate International Talk Like a Pirate Day) Thar be a hunt for treasure, Mateys!
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Missing Microbes: How the Overuse of…
Loading...

Missing Microbes: How the Overuse of Antibiotics Is Fueling Our Modern… (2014)

by Martin J. Blaser, Emma Bakkevik (Translator), Ole Elvebakk (Translator), Hanne Nøkleby (Translator)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2281872,495 (4.04)52
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 52 mentions

English (18)  French (1)  All languages (19)
Showing 1-5 of 18 (next | show all)
This book is essentially three parts: The opening, where the author lays out his case; the middle, where he offers the best evidence he can present to support his hypothesis; the closing, where solutions are offered. The quality of each part is very different. When laying out the case, he does a very good job of explaining his thinking. When offering evidence, he lost me a bit - actually, a lot - because the associations and causations don't seem that clear. With the closing, he shines, because the solutions are very practical, implementable, and include a discussion of FMT, which has blown my mind since hearing about it. That actually might ultimately be the best solution. So if he's right about the loss of the key parts of our microbiome, then the solution is very present. Unfortunately, even if he is 100% correct about his findings, it might take a long time to achieve consensus, and lives will be lost or compromised in the interim. He has lots of hard, outreach, PSA, clinical trial work to do, on top of what he's already done. The day is short, and the work is long. ( )
  MartinBodek | Jun 11, 2015 |
A fascinating book that links the overuse of antibiotics to the astronomical rise of such chronic health problems as obesity, asthma, diabetes, celiac and Crohn’s diseases, food allergies, and possibly even autism. Blaser will even make you think twice about regularly using hand sanitizer. Accessible, engrossing, and convincing. ( )
1 vote Sullywriter | May 22, 2015 |
Oh look! Another book that makes intelligent decision-making even more difficult! You probably should not read this if you're easily freaked out by the end of the world. I am somewhat immune (pun intended) to being freaked out by certain things, since I'll never have children: I will not, for example, have to decide whether treating my six-month-year old with antibiotics for a painful ear infection is worth the risk of permanently throwing their microbiome out of whack, which may lead to a host of other difficulties down the road. My own microbiome is, I'm sure, thoroughly out of whack already, so I can remain somewhat fatalist about real life while very much enjoying the intelligent, well-written overview of human-relevant microbiology, history of antibiotics, and discussions of the author's ongoing scientific experimentation. I would recommend this to science nerds and any woman considering a C-section for any reason beyond that of life and death. (Or you can just take my word for it while I summarize that part of the book: Don't. Your baby will thank you.)

SAMPLE PARAGRAPH

So the British scientists took their efforts to Peoria, Illinois, where the new Fermentation Division of the Northern Regional Research Laboratory was gearing up studies about using the metabolism of molds (fermentation) as a source of new microorganisms. Its staff was experienced and had a substantial collection of molds, but few of their strains made penicillin, and none was prolific. Thus the call went out to everyone they knew: send us samples of soil, moldy grain, fruits, and vegetables. A woman was hired to scour the markets, bakeries, and cheese stores of Peoria for samples bearing blue-green mold. She did the job so well they called her Moldy Mary. But in the end, a housewife brought in a moldy cantaloupe that changed the course of history. This particular mold produced 250 units of penicillin per milliliter of broth. One of its mutants churned out 50,000 units per milliliter. All strains of penicillin today are descendants from that 1943 mold.

This review originally appeared on my blog, This Space Intentionally Left Blank ( )
  emepps | Jan 23, 2015 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
A book with critical and far-reaching implications for health and wellnes.

We have an extreme environmental crisis happening right under our noses - literally. Author Martin J Blaser is sounding the clarion call that something drastic and detrimental is happening to the microbal population of the human gut. Dr. Blaser has made his life's work the study of the microbes and their effect on human health particularily in regards to the human digestive system. He began to notice a trend of microbal die-off, in some cases so drastic that whole species were in danger of becoming extinct. Along with this trend he also noticed the increase of modern illnesses such as diabetes, asthma and obesity. Could the two be related? Dr. Blaser's research gives a strong argument that the answer is Yes. Having extensively studied the H. plyori microbe (implicated in the causation of ulcers) Dr. Blaser discovered that this microbe can switch from causing illness to becoming immune enhancing depending on it's environment; an environment that has been undergoing fundemental changes from a combination of assaults including extensive antibiotic use, modern medical practices and sweeping changes in the food system. These changes have either destroyed beneficial microbes along with harmful ones or have had the effect of not 'seeding' the gut with the beneficial microbes that are necessary to proper function. Dr. Blaser alerts us to what is happening and how to either minimize or reverse this damage.

I will go out on a limb and say that is is possibly the most important health related topic of our times and this book explains and clarifies this issue perfectly. Calling this book the SILENT SPRING of the microbal world would not be an exaggeration. While the information is complicated, Dr. Blaser makes it completely accessable and clear. The methodical stating of his case of how severe this problem truly is leads to the final chapter of solution suggestions. Implementing these solutions would require a sea-change of attitude as it would challenge many firmly intrenched ideas and protocols plus, in some cases, there is a strong disgust factor (I will leaveit to you to discover the details of that yourself - just remember it is gut bacteria that is being discussed). Important book, critical topic - recommmended for anyone who cares about health and human survival. ( )
  buchowl | Aug 23, 2014 |
A relaxed easy read, with a well crafted development supporting you all the way into unknown territory. This is a seminal book that you really must read, your view of life, of your body and how you care for it will change. There will be no going back. Once you get your mind around the ancestry, diversity and sheer mass of bacteria then the next step of understanding that it we that are parasites living in a bacterial world becomes easier. Parasites that some bacteria have evolved to encourage and support, defending their host from all the pathogens out there. All the time Martin Blaser draws on his life experiences to illustrate, illuminate and lead us forward. Experiences founded in leading edge bacteria researches. This could so easily be a heavy academic book but it is not. Running against the accepted medical doctrine never wins friends or converts. Yet we get to see and understand the inevitability of his line of reasoning. Why then is this new insight not widely accepted? If I have a criticism it would be just that, the absence of the counter argument, any exploration of alternatives. A one sided argument is begging the question, what are the other explanations? But then this is a book aimed at the casual reader so must not confuse.
With such an important new view of human biology, some tub thumping is forgivable. As is muted railings against fellow academia who fail to see the significance of the insight his research has proven. The offered final conclusions seem weak and limp, particularly as they were all so many times pre-trailed. Martin Blaser's research into the biology of the stomach may have narrowed his focus. I have no doubt at all that with his insight into the significance of bacteria in the regulation of the health and well-being of our bodies, whole new areas of primary significance are going to emerge. Make no mistakes, this is an important book. Read it and change your view on life and health. ( )
  tonysomerset | Jun 24, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 18 (next | show all)
Here is a video clip of interview with Martin Blaser on the Daily Show
http://thedailyshow.cc.com/videos/rex...
added by libri_amor | editDaily Show, Jon Stewart (May 13, 2014)
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Blaser, Martin J.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bakkevik, EmmaTranslatormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Elvebakk, OleTranslatormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Nøkleby, HanneTranslatormain authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
"We live in the Age of Bacteria (as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, until the world ends) . . ."

—Stephen Jay Gould, Cambridge, MA, 1993
Dedication
To my children, and to future children with a bright future
First words
I never knew two of my father's sisters.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0805098100, Hardcover)

A critically important and startling look at the harmful effects of overusing antibiotics, from the field's leading expert

Tracing one scientist’s journey toward understanding the crucial importance of the microbiome, this revolutionary book will take readers to the forefront of trail-blazing research while revealing the damage that overuse of antibiotics is doing to our health: contributing to the rise of obesity, asthma, diabetes, and certain forms of cancer. In Missing Microbes, Dr. Martin Blaser invites us into the wilds of the human microbiome where for hundreds of thousands of years bacterial and human cells have existed in a peaceful symbiosis that is responsible for the health and equilibrium of our body. Now, this invisible eden is being irrevocably damaged by some of our most revered medical advances—antibiotics—threatening the extinction of our irreplaceable microbes with terrible health consequences. Taking us into both the lab and deep into the fields where these troubling effects can be witnessed firsthand, Blaser not only provides cutting edge evidence for the adverse effects of antibiotics, he tells us what we can do to avoid even more catastrophic health problems in the future.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:03 -0400)

"A critically important and startling look at the harmful effects of overusing antibiotics, from the field's leading expert Tracing one scientist's journey toward understanding the crucial importance of the microbiome, this revolutionary book will take readers to the forefront of trail-blazing research while revealing the damage that overuse of antibiotics is doing to our health: contributing to the rise of obesity, asthma, diabetes, and certain forms of cancer. In Missing Microbes, Dr. Martin Blaser invites us into the wilds of the human microbiome where for hundreds of thousands of years bacterial and human cells have existed in a peaceful symbiosis that is responsible for the health and equilibrium of our body. Now, this invisible eden is being irrevocably damaged by some of our most revered medical advances--antibiotics--threatening the extinction of our irreplaceable microbes with terrible health consequences. Taking us into both the lab and deep into the fields where these troubling effects can be witnessed firsthand, Blaser not only provides cutting edge evidence for the adverse effects of antibiotics, he tells us what we can do to avoid even more catastrophic health problems in the future. "-- "Tracing one scientist's journey toward understanding the crucial importance of the microbiome, this revolutionary book will take readers to the forefront of trail-blazing research while revealing the damage that overuse of antibiotics is doing to our health: contributing to the rise of obesity, asthma, diabetes, and certain forms of cancer. In Missing Microbes, Dr. Martin Blaser invites us into the wilds of the human microbiome where for hundreds of thousands of years bacterial and human cells have existed in a peaceful symbiosis that is responsible for the health and equilibrium of our body. Now, this invisible eden is being irrevocably damaged by some of our most revered medical advances--antibiotics--threatening the extinction of our irreplaceable microbes with terrible health consequences. Taking us into both the lab and deep into the fields where these troubling effects can be witnessed firsthand, Blaser not only provides cutting edge evidence for the adverse effects of antibiotics, he tells us what we can do to avoid even more catastrophic health problems in the future"--… (more)

» see all 3 descriptions

LibraryThing Early Reviewers Alum

Martin J. Blaser's book Missing Microbes was available from LibraryThing Early Reviewers.

Sign up to get a pre-publication copy in exchange for a review.

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.04)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 3
3.5 4
4 24
4.5 2
5 10

Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 128,816,599 books! | Top bar: Always visible