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How to Think About Exercise by Damon Young
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How to Think About Exercise

by Damon Young

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Exercise... there's a dirty word! It is impossible to stand in line at the grocery store and not see some magazine cover promising to help lose inches and pounds without lifting a finger in exercise; or maybe promise 14 days of repetitive motion will whittle a few inches off your bum.

So when I saw the title of this book it made me stop and want to see what there was to think about in exercise. When I finished the book, it didn't take long. it's only 160 pages long. I was kind of overwhelmed with all the heavy duty philosophical discussion and references to ancient arts. The book bogged down a lot with deep discussions that seem to make their point early and then went on and on.

But there were many statements that made me think about my life and my exercise routines.

My personal exercise interests are walking and yoga so the chapters on those areas stood out for me.
Any time you read a self-help book and come away having "seen the light", finding ways to improve the quality of your life, then the author has been successful.
( )
  Itzey | Jan 23, 2016 |
I received the book for free through Goodreads First Reads.

I don't normally read books about exercise, because they are boring to me. This book changed my outlook on exercise books. It was very witty and philosophical. It showed that smart people can exercise too, not just the steroid heavy types. In fact, the book reveals how even intelligent people should strive to work out more. Working out can increase your creativity and give your mind a rest at the same time.

I loved the author's side notes through the book. I also loved how he included pictures of himself trying to complete his own personal goals. He also asks questions for you to ponder about. I also learned some things about Charles Darwin I never knew before.

The main question in the book that really got me thinking was "How far did you walk today?" I also loved the chapter on tennis because I used to play.

I think everyone would find this book enjoyable. It discusses many different sports, and even if your a couch potato it gets you to think about how you could change and add in a few minutes of exercise to your life.

I look forward to reading more of this author's works. I also am considering reading What I Talk About When I Talk About Running by Haruki Murakami. The author discussed him a few times in How to Think about Exercise, and he really seems extraordinary! ( )
  karatheredhead | Jan 10, 2015 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0230767761, Paperback)

It can often seem as though existence is split in two: body and mind, flesh and spirit, moving and thinking. In the office or at study we are 'mind workers', with superfluous bodies. In the gym we stretch, run and lift, but our minds are idle. Damon Young challenges this idea, revealing how fitness can develop our bodies and minds as one. Exploring exercises and sports with the help of ancient and modern philosophy, he uncovers the pleasures, virtues and big ideas of fitness. By exercising intelligently, we are committing to wholeness: enjoying and enhancing our full humanity. One in the new series of books from The School of Life, launched January 2014: How to Age by Anne Karpf How to Develop Emotional Health by Oliver James How to Be Alone by Sara Maitland How to Deal with Adversity by Christopher Hamilton How to Think About Exercise by Damon Young How to Connect with Nature by Tristan Gooley 'This new series of The School of Life's self-help books build on the strengths of the first, tackling some of the hardest issues of our lives in a way that is genuinely informative, helpful and consoling. Here are books that prove that the term "self-help" doesn't have to be either shallow or naive' Alain de Botton, Founder of The School of Life books that prove that the term "self-help" doesn't have to be either shallow or naive' Alain de Botton, Founder of The School of Life

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:04 -0400)

It can often seem as though existence is split in two: body and mind, flesh and spirit, moving and thinking. In the office or at study we are 'mind workers', with superfluous bodies. In the gym we stretch, run and lift, but our minds are idle. Damon Young challenges this idea, revealing how fitness can develop our bodies and minds as one. Exploring exercises and sports with the help of ancient and modern philosophy, he uncovers the pleasures, virtues and big ideas of fitness. By exercising intelligently, we are committing to wholeness: enjoying and enhancing our full humanity.… (more)

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