HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Mary Queen of Scots. by Antonia. Fraser
Loading...

Mary Queen of Scots. (original 1969; edition 1987)

by Antonia. Fraser

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,477224,242 (3.96)77
Mary Queen of Scots passed her childhood in France and married the Dauphin to become Queen of France at the age of sixteen. Widowed less than two years later, she returned to Scotland as Queen after an absence of thirteen years. Her life then entered its best known phase: the early struggles with John Knox, and the unruly Scottish nobility; the fatal marriage to Darnley and his mysterious death; her marriage to Bothwell, the chief suspect, that led directly to her long English captivity at the hands of Queen Elizabeth; the poignant and extraordinary story of her long imprisonment that ended with the labyrinthine Babington plot to free her, and her execution at the age of forty-four.… (more)
Member:chryston
Title:Mary Queen of Scots.
Authors:Antonia. Fraser
Info:Weidenfeld & Nicolson (1987), Paperback
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:history

Work details

Mary Queen of Scots by Antonia Fraser (1969)

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 77 mentions

English (20)  Italian (1)  All languages (21)
Showing 1-5 of 20 (next | show all)
I was inspired to read this book after seeing the film about Mary last year and I really enjoyed it for a detailed and balanced view of a woman with a fascinating life. ( )
  mari_reads | Nov 20, 2019 |
Antonia Fraser’s biography tells the story of Mary Queen of Scots, whom the cover bills as the most tragic and romantic figure in history. Mary’s story is told with sympathy but not uncritically; Fraser discusses all aspects of Mary’s character and deals with other major figures, such as Elizabeth I and even Bothwell (Mary’s third husband, the chief suspect in the murder of her second husband), fairly. Her writing is fluid and her footnotes deployed to maximum effect, highlighting areas where she had done extra research or where scholarship was contentious, and recommending other works on certain areas of Scottish history.

This is a comprehensive and deeply moving biography; I was crying during the last chapter, when Mary was executed. The detail that underscores the tragedy was Mary’s dog: the Skye terrier had been smuggled in under her skirts, and after its mistress was executed it got out and sat unconsolably whimpering between Mary’s head and her decapitated body.

I highly recommend this biography; even though there may be new scholarship about Mary, given that this was published in 1969, it is a vivid, sensitive and thoughtful portrait of Scotland's best-known queen. ( )
  rabbitprincess | Sep 7, 2018 |
The ultimate cautionary tale about marrying a man just because he is taller than you, this biography is a testament to the Fraser's meticulous research and the immediacy of her writing (and also the unfortunate mess that seems to be Mary's tragic life, seriously, just the worst luck coupled with terrible decision-making) that even as I was reading and finished reading about events from five centuries ago, I was and still am holding out hope that the story will end differently. Even though it is distinctively less objective - the style is decidedly on the side of a long profile piece in the lift-out magazine of the weekend newspaper, (o)ver(l)y sympathetic and apotheosising - than her later work on Marie-Antoinette, it is nonetheless detailed, educational and eminently readable.

Aside #1: Apparently there is a movie of Mary-Elizabeth coming out this year. Current casting aside, as if Ronan would not make a luminous Elizabeth I, instead of what currently looks to be a Helena-Bonham-Carter-in-Alice-in-Wonderland-inspired caricature. As for Mary, Queen of Scots, (who Fraser reports is five feet eleven, just over 180cm), who could possibly play a tall, red-haired Scottish queen with renowned complexion, as if not Amy Pond!

Aside #2, exciting link to my favourite (Decca) Mitford: The Chatsworth House, one of the many places in which Mary was kept prisoner, was the Chatsworth of sister Debo Mitford's duchess life! ( )
1 vote kitzyl | Aug 14, 2018 |
I think one reviewer here noted that Fraser is just in love with Mary Stuart and I tend to agree. This is a substantial and detailed work (although I still felt my lack of overall knowledge of the period at times) but Fraser does find it hard to ever find fault in Mary. She is a tragic figure, for sure, but this sets her up as sometimes a bit of plaster saint. It was a long time to read, clocking in at over 600 pages, but I'm glad I persevered. I was most moved by the epilouge, that despite the tragedy of her life, Mary Queen of Scots is the actual mother of the English royal family with a direct line of descent straight down to the current Queen. So despite, her long and ultimately fatal struggle to assure her place in te succession, she was the one who did win out.
  amyem58 | Dec 27, 2017 |
Antonia Fraser's classic biography is divided into three parts, for Mary's time in France, in Scotland, and in England.
For Fraser, Mary was a gentle, charitable soul totally unprepared by her French education and upbringing for the treacherous snakepit she found in Scotland. She made two big mistakes in her life, marrying Darnley and acquiescing to the Babington plot -- though by then after 18 years' imprisonment she was desperate.

Although like everyone I was familiar with the broad outline of her life, this thorough biography placed it all in context giving me at least a much better understanding of the background to Mary's time in France and Scotland. Although she does not indulge in the romanticism of some Marians, nevertheless, I found Fraser's account of Mary's last days and her execution unexpectedly moving. ( )
  Robertgreaves | Jan 28, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 20 (next | show all)
Lady Antonia Fraser is young, beautiful, and rich, an earl’s daughter married to a busy and successful politician, the mother of a large family; yet she has surmounted all these handicaps to authorship to produce a first-rate historical biography.
added by jburlinson | editNew York Review of Books, J. P. Kenyon (pay site) (Nov 6, 1969)
 

» Add other authors (5 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Antonia Fraserprimary authorall editionscalculated
Piggott, ReginaldIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Strong, RoyIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To Hugh, with love and thanks
for Lila de Nobili
First words
The winter of 1542 was marked by tempestuous weather throughout the British Isles: in the north, on the borders of Scotland and England, there were heavy snow-falls in December and frost so savage that by January the ships were frozen into the harbour at Newcastle.
Quotations
Despite her lonely position without counsel, Mary never for a moment lost her head.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Mary Queen of Scots passed her childhood in France and married the Dauphin to become Queen of France at the age of sixteen. Widowed less than two years later, she returned to Scotland as Queen after an absence of thirteen years. Her life then entered its best known phase: the early struggles with John Knox, and the unruly Scottish nobility; the fatal marriage to Darnley and his mysterious death; her marriage to Bothwell, the chief suspect, that led directly to her long English captivity at the hands of Queen Elizabeth; the poignant and extraordinary story of her long imprisonment that ended with the labyrinthine Babington plot to free her, and her execution at the age of forty-four.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Warmth, sympathy and compassion blend magnificently in this remarkably human biography of one of history's most controversial figures. In this monumental work, Antonia Fraser depicts all the romance, color, comedy, and tragedy that tempered the life and times of Mary Stuart, a woman who survived religious revolt and political opposition in her native land only to be denied her freedom and eventually her life, by her rival and kinswoman, Elizabeth.Mary Queen of Scots convincingly repudiates the popular notion of Mary as a violent and tyrannical ruler. Instead, she is seen as an intensely feminine, regal yet tragic figure, a woman consistently and treacherously betrayed by those closest to her. Her golden years as a French princess, when she was cherished and protected by her mother's House of Guise, and her brief marriage to the French king Francis II present a vivid contrast to the bitterness and unrelenting hatred she faced when she left her adoptive land to reenter Protestant Scotland as its Catholic ruler. Her ill-fated marriages to Darnley and Bothwell, her incessant struggle with political and religious saboteurs, her flight to England and subsequent imprisonment--all provoke the fierce religious and personal loyalties that led to her execution at Fotheringhay--Front flap.
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.96)
0.5 1
1 3
1.5 1
2 7
2.5 2
3 54
3.5 14
4 129
4.5 18
5 72

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 151,766,426 books! | Top bar: Always visible