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Biskopmordene by S. S. Van Dine
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Biskopmordene (original 1928; edition 1977)

by S. S. Van Dine (Author)

Series: Philo Vance (4)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
18810102,972 (3.4)25
The Bishop Murder Case is the fourth mystery novel about the immensely popular fictional detective Philo Vance, a sleuth and aesthete, by S. S. Van Dine, the pseudonym of Willard Huntington Wright (1888-1939), an American art critic and detective novelist. Philo Vance is a fictional character featured in a total of 12 crime novels, published in the 1920s and 1930s. During that time, Vance was immensely popular in books, movies and on the radio. He was portrayed as a stylish, even foppish dandy, a New York bon vivant possessing a highly intellectual bent. The novels were chronicled by his friend Van Dine (who appears as a kind of Dr. Watson figure in the books as well as the author). Van Dine's first three mystery novels were unusual for mystery fiction because he planned them as a trilogy, but plotted and wrote them in short form, more or less at the same time. After they were accepted as a group by famed editor Maxwell Perkins, Van Dine expanded them into full-length novels. Although Van Dine was one of the most educated and cosmopolitan detective writers of his time, in his essays, he dismissed the idea of the mystery story as serious literature. He insisted that a detective novel should be mainly an intellectual puzzle that follows strict rules and does not wander too far afield from its central theme. [Elib]… (more)
Member:bnielsen
Title:Biskopmordene
Authors:S. S. Van Dine (Author)
Info:Kbh. : Lademann, [1977].
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:Crime, Fiction

Work details

The Bishop Murder Case by S. S. Van Dine (1928)

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» See also 25 mentions

English (7)  Italian (1)  Spanish (1)  Danish (1)  All languages (10)
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
This is the first book I read by Van Dine. I read two more, so I most have felt he was worth reading. ( )
1 vote Schmerguls | Sep 15, 2013 |
Definitely a puzzle mystery, and a rather gruesome one at that! ( )
1 vote JeffreyMarks | Jul 11, 2013 |
This was made into a movie, which I saw before reading this. I was not happy with whodunit because it seemed to me that the author strongly suggested / said that it was not possible for this person to have dunit.

Philo Vance is very rich, smart and knowledgeable. In fact, the book has footnotes! It also has a list of characters and tracks the date and time of the events.

He has a very close friend who spends most of his time with Vance and is therefore able to record how the mystery is solved even though he rarely if ever speaks. What he does is tell the reader things like, "... and it marked the beginning of the last phase of our investigation---a phase fraught with such sinister, soul-stirring tragedy and unspeakable horror, with such wanton cruelty and monstrous humor, that even now, years later, as I set down this reportorial record of it, I find it difficult to believe that the events were not, after all, a mere grotesque dream of fabulous wickedness." ( )
1 vote raizel | Jul 1, 2013 |
Very good mystery in the Sherlock Holmes style - Philo Vance is a wealthy, erudite American version of Holmes complete with Van Dine as his Watson. I was sure I knew the culprit until being confounded at the very end. I like the fact that there was no "cheating" - no clues hidden from the reader. ( )
1 vote leslie.98 | Jun 26, 2013 |
Philo Vance mystery #4 but the first available to me in the Nova Scotia library system. Published in 1928. I know Vance is supposed to be a ‘dandy’ but the book seemed to me to be a vehicle for Van Dine to show off his knowledge of mathematics.

Mystery was okay, time & setting (NYC) were delightful. ( )
1 vote ParadisePorch | Jan 4, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
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Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
The Earth is a Temple where there is going on a Mystery Play, childish and poignant, ridiculous and awful enough in all conscience. Conrad
Dedication
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Of all the criminal cases in which Philo Vance participated as an unofficial investigator, the most sinister, the most bizarre, the seemingly most incomprehensible, and certainly the most terrifying, was the one that followed the famous Greene murders.
Quotations
Vance had risen, but before he could speak Arnesson came forward and shook his finger in mock reprimand at Drukker. 'You really should learn control, Adolph. You take life with such abominable seriousness. You've worked in interstellar spatial magnitudes long enough to have some sense of proportion. Why attach so much importance to this pin-point of life on earth?' Drukker was breathing stertorously. 'These swine -' he began. 'Oh, my dear Adolph!' Arnesson cut him short. 'The entire human race are swine. Why particularize? ... Come along. I'll see you home.'
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Description in Albatross 48 (1933): A champion archer is mysteriously pierced through the heart by an arrow. The ensuing investigations are fraught with baffling horrors but, thanks to the unique methods of Philo Vance, friend of the District Attorney, the weird problem is solved. Vance is one of the great amateur detectives and a worthy successor to Sherlock Holmes.
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