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A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
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A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (1943)

by Betty Smith, Betty Smith, Betty Smith

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9,996273285 (4.34)1 / 675
English (261)  Spanish (5)  French (1)  Chinese, traditional (1)  Italian (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (270)
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This book makes me appreciate the advantage I had in my life start over billions of other people, and think how I used it. It also makes me better understand and respect the achievements and difficulties of others.

You may not think of yourself as "the one percent", but if you have a college degree for example, you are in the top seven percent of the lucky and rich people in this world. ( )
  valdanylchuk | Aug 26, 2015 |
I am so glad I read this book--it's absolutely wonderful. Wise, warm and heartbreaking. And great historical information. I would never have thought anything could pique my curiosity about the history of Brooklyn! ( )
  Lesley-Anne | Jul 24, 2015 |
Another book I've been meaning to read for a long, long time. A beautifully written coming-of-age story with wonderfully crafted characters and a vivid sense of time and place. ( )
  Sullywriter | May 22, 2015 |
While reading When Books Went to War, I learned that this book was one of the favorites of GIs during World War II. And that the author became a pen pal to many of them who wrote to her after discovering the joys of pleasure reading for the first time. I just had to read the book and find out for myself what those GIs saw in thebook.

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn tells the story of Francie Nolan, a young girl growing up Brooklyn in the early years of the 20th Century. Readers also get to know her younger brother, her parents and their extended family. They didn’t live easy lives, and knew what it was to be hungry. Readers also see the extreme sacrifice was necessary for parents who wanted ensure that their children lived an easier life than they did. We learn how children were expected, even at very young ages, to contribute financially to the households.

And, yet, this was now a downer of a book, not by a long shot. It shows how people can survive; even thrive in the harshest of environments. Of course, the story is set in an era when our much talked about “safety net,” wasn’t part of the vocabulary. But had it been available at that time, it’s likely Francie’s parents would not have taken advantage of such “charity.”

This was a story that moved along, had engaging characters, and was simply written without too much drama or angst. I can see why new readers would be attracted to it. ( )
  NewsieQ | Apr 21, 2015 |
I first read A Tree Grows in Brooklyn nearly nine years ago and wondered back then why I had not read it sooner. It was not required reading for me in high school in the 1980s. I was thrilled when I saw this on my 8th grader's English class reading list for this school year -- I like to read what my kids are reading in school. Just finished reading it again and fell in love all over again with this book.

Francie is a memorable character and I really felt for her every time she encountered various difficulties, though not presented in a maudlin way, throughout her childhood life. Other characters are memorable too, and there's a lot I still remembered from my first read.

I definitely would re-read again and again -- perhaps every ten years or so. I'm sorry that my oldest two were not required to read this book in the school system they attended. I hope they will someday. As for my eighth grader, he liked this book -- he had to ask me about quite a few things that they probably didn't go into deeply in class (i.e. when Francie "became a woman" (menstruation) or when she received a special underwear set). I enjoyed talking with him about the incidents and characters of this book.

A rare five-star from me. It's interesting, though, that the author's other novels did not quite measure up to this one. I read "Joy in the Morning", not long after reading ATGIB (pronounced "at-gib", as my son and his class called it) the first time around -- it was good but not as good as ATGIB. ( )
  ValerieAndBooks | Apr 20, 2015 |
This is one of my all-time favorite books. I first read it in high school, probably 46 years ago, at least! This time I listened to the audio version and it was wonderful; great narrator. It made me smile to listen to this story about Francie Nolan's growing up in Brooklyn (where I lived in 1956-1957). It's a timeless classic and I only wish there was a sequel to it. It's our work's book club pick for this month, so I can't wait to discuss it. If you haven't read it, you MUST. Love love love it! ( )
  sandra.k.heinzman | Apr 2, 2015 |
This is one of my all-time favorite books. I first read it in high school, probably 46 years ago, at least! This time I listened to the audio version and it was wonderful; great narrator. It made me smile to listen to this story about Francie Nolan's growing up in Brooklyn (where I lived in 1956-1957). It's a timeless classic and I only wish there was a sequel to it. It's our work's book club pick for this month, so I can't wait to discuss it. If you haven't read it, you MUST. Love love love it! ( )
  sandra.k.heinzman | Apr 2, 2015 |
This is one of my all-time favorite books. I first read it in high school, probably 46 years ago, at least! This time I listened to the audio version and it was wonderful; great narrator. It made me smile to listen to this story about Francie Nolan's growing up in Brooklyn (where I lived in 1956-1957). It's a timeless classic and I only wish there was a sequel to it. It's our work's book club pick for this month, so I can't wait to discuss it. If you haven't read it, you MUST. Love love love it! ( )
  sandra.k.heinzman | Apr 2, 2015 |
This is one of my all-time favorite books. I first read it in high school, probably 46 years ago, at least! This time I listened to the audio version and it was wonderful; great narrator. It made me smile to listen to this story about Francie Nolan's growing up in Brooklyn (where I lived in 1956-1957). It's a timeless classic and I only wish there was a sequel to it. It's our work's book club pick for this month, so I can't wait to discuss it. If you haven't read it, you MUST. Love love love it! ( )
  sandra.k.heinzman | Apr 2, 2015 |
This is one of my all-time favorite books. I first read it in high school, probably 46 years ago, at least! This time I listened to the audio version and it was wonderful; great narrator. It made me smile to listen to this story about Francie Nolan's growing up in Brooklyn (where I lived in 1956-1957). It's a timeless classic and I only wish there was a sequel to it. It's our work's book club pick for this month, so I can't wait to discuss it. If you haven't read it, you MUST. Love love love it! ( )
  sandra.k.heinzman | Apr 2, 2015 |
This is one of my all-time favorite books. I first read it in high school, probably 46 years ago, at least! This time I listened to the audio version and it was wonderful; great narrator. It made me smile to listen to this story about Francie Nolan's growing up in Brooklyn (where I lived in 1956-1957). It's a timeless classic and I only wish there was a sequel to it. It's our work's book club pick for this month, so I can't wait to discuss it. If you haven't read it, you MUST. Love love love it! ( )
  sandra.k.heinzman | Apr 2, 2015 |
This is one of my all-time favorite books. I first read it in high school, probably 46 years ago, at least! This time I listened to the audio version and it was wonderful; great narrator. It made me smile to listen to this story about Francie Nolan's growing up in Brooklyn (where I lived in 1956-1957). It's a timeless classic and I only wish there was a sequel to it. It's our work's book club pick for this month, so I can't wait to discuss it. If you haven't read it, you MUST. Love love love it! ( )
  sandra.k.heinzman | Apr 2, 2015 |
Much to do about little. ( )
  olongbourn | Mar 1, 2015 |
A Tree Grows In Brooklyn is the most nostalgic, sentimental book I have ever read. It starts slow. A hundred pages in and all you have is character description, setting, and back story (personally, I would have been happy with much less back story). Another hundred pages in you'll find what may be the start of the story, more setting, more character description. If you're more astute than I was, by this point you should have figured out that this was the story. In many novels, such a lack of defined plot would be detrimental to the success of the book. In A Tree Grows In Brooklyn, the loosely-defined story is its strength.

A Tree Grows In Brooklyn is the story of living and wanting and hoping. It centers around a Brooklyn girl and her family in the early 1900s. What else could one say about the story? That's pretty much what the book is about. That's not to say events do not happen, events that are important in the life of Francie, but these moments are not what the story is about, nor are they all that memorable. They mirror our own lives. Sure a fist fight may have seemed significant when you were in the second grade. The death of a relative may have seemed insurmountable at the time. A short-lived romance may have felt like the moving of heaven and earth when you were sixteen. But who'd read a book about events that seem so trivial in hindsight? Betty Smith, that's who.

Smith has truly captured what it means to be human in this debut novel. She recalls childhood with such insight that it is easy to forget you're reading. It doesn't matter that her streets were not my own. Nor that her wars were not mine. One hundred years may separate us, but I could largely identify with Francie Nolan. While cultural differences abound throughout the world, there is enough honest truth at the heart of Francie's story that I'd argue it is universal at its core. Regardless of plot, that is effective storytelling.

It's difficult to write a riveting book, but one is published often enough that you know you'll find another page-turner one day, if not soon. But to find such a real, honest, and natural book again... there is always hope. ( )
  chrisblocker | Feb 23, 2015 |
Let me start this review by saying this is a classic that every American citizen should read. It brings you back to a time when life was much harder than it is today-people actually had to work hard and sometimes fight for every single piece of bread being put on the table. Our society has evolved into something allowing people to just get what they want, so it was refreshing to read a book about people who worked hard for their earnings.

The Nolan family has definitely had their fair share of hardships, but that doesn't stop Katie, Francie's mother, from trying to create the best home for her family that they can afford. They go out of their way to make every penny stretch. From going to different butchers for better cuts of meat, to walking an extra couple of blocks for a less expensive bread at a bakery, this family knew how to save money. And with Johnny, Francie's father, spending all of his extra earnings at the local tavern, Katie found her way of saving a necessary way of life.

We follow Francie through her daily life and sometimes wonder how she and her young brother can make it another day when they are cold and hungry. They look forward to school knowing they at least will not be cold for the day. Francie has high expectations early on in life when she sets her eyes on a school in another District that would offer her a better education. Her father may have been the local drunk, but he helped Francie do what she needed to attend that school.

There were moments in this book making me giggle with delight, while others had me gasping with astonishment. I can't help but consider this book a great American novel that should be read by everyone, especially young kids that have everything given to them. With themes of family, struggles, and America, I'm sure you all would enjoy this novel as much as I did. I highly recommend this novel for either personal leisure or as a book club discussion. ( )
1 vote jo-jo | Feb 15, 2015 |
The images of this book have remained with me, when I tend to forget a lot of the books that I read. I enjoyed reading about this time in history. ( )
  anitatally | Jan 25, 2015 |
Despite the writing, this book is absolutely amazing. I know without a doubt that Francie will always hold a place in my heart.

Along with about a million other characters.

And about two million crushes. ( )
1 vote IsaboeOfLumatere | Jan 14, 2015 |
While Betty Smith’s A Tree Grows in Brooklyn will never rival Henry Roth’s Call It Sleep for so-called high-brow literature, the two books have something in common: pluck. In the eminently readable A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Smith shows it to us in the Nolans—a half Irish-, half Austrian-American family at home(s) in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. In Call It Sleep, Roth uses stream-of-consciousness alongside narrative descriptions of squalor and depravity on the Lower East Side of Manhattan to show us—if you’ll allow a clunky metaphor—an alternative definition of pluck: namely, “the heart, liver, windpipe and lungs of a slaughtered animal” (American Heritage Dictionary). Is it fair to say that one novel is better than the other, that one writer is more accomplished than the other? I think it is. Henry Roth wins hands down. If Roth’s novel deals with depravity, Smith’s deals with deprivation. The difference between Roth’s David Schearl (the beaten young “hero” of Call It Sleep) and Smith’s Francie Nolan (the coming-of-age heroine of A Tree Grows in Brooklyn) is no less than that between resignation and hope. On Manhattan’s Lower East Side in the first two decades of the last century, ‘hope’ would’ve been a cynical sluice to the East River and its pollutants. In the Williamsburg ghetto of the same period, ‘hope’ would’ve been the only dyke keeping that same river and its pollutants at bay. Hope, for the heroes of both stories, is just a well-appreciated resting place along the way to resignation. If there’s any similarity between the two novels, it’s to be found in Chapter 43 of A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. This—at least to my way of thinking—is where Betty Smith’s prose shines with a brilliance equal to Roth’s. Why, then, would I here suggest that Roth is the better writer? In deciding upon the virtues of the harp or the lyre versus the trombone or the tuba, first consider the player—as much that of the reviewer as that of the author. I find that Roth takes me deeper into his characters and into their immediate circumstances while Smith tweaks me as a reader. For my money, she’s a bit too heavy-handed in jerking the obvious tear. Would I read either or both once again? Unequivocally, yes. I’ve already read Call It Sleep twice. I may one day invest in a second reading of A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. If, in a word or two, I had to characterize the two novels, I’d say that Call It Sleep stretches the brain cells while A Tree Grows in Brooklyn tugs at the heart strings. Either way, you can’t lose. But what do I know? Call It Sleep had to wait thirty years to find an appreciable (and appreciative) audience; meanwhile, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn was an instant success. Is there a more fitting—and telling—tribute to the American myth? Ms. Smith, meet Mr. Horatio Alger. ( )
  RussellBittner | Dec 12, 2014 |
I ran across this book at the library and picked it up wondering how I had gotten to such a grand old age without reading this classic. After several pages I began to falter in my determination to read it in its entirety. But I persevered and the book began to grow on me and I even shed tears several times the tale was so moving. I was surprised to realize that so much of what was taking place in the early 1900's still takes place today. How I wanted to buy several sacks of groceries and time travel to Francie apt and hand them over! Hunger was a huge part of her life! What amazed me the most was how I related to her statement on how she did not like women. It has been my experience that woman tend to hate other women. Child birth does not bind us together, submission to the "man's world" does not bind us together. Francie learned this at a tender age, I learned it much later and should have realized it in grammar school! Loved this book once I became emotionally engaged with the characters and the story. ( )
  Alphawoman | Dec 6, 2014 |
This book is one of my favorites! Read my full review at http://owlyouneedreads.blogspot.com/2013/04/a-tree-grows-in-brooklyn.html ( )
  knsievert | Nov 25, 2014 |
This book is one of my favorites! Read my full review at http://owlyouneedreads.blogspot.com/2013/04/a-tree-grows-in-brooklyn.html ( )
  knsievert | Nov 25, 2014 |
Smith, Betty. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. 1947. 420 pp. $17.99. Harper. 978-0061120-077.
Francie Nolan is the precocious and thoughtful daughter of a hardworking yet stern mother and her beloved alcoholic father who struggle to get by in the impoverished slums of Brooklyn. Smith records in dizzying detail the daily lives of Francie and her brother Neely. Smith’s characters are richly developed and memorable, and the characters’ struggles continue to be relatable. This coming-of-age tale is realistic and full of tenderness, without being sentimental. Issues such as poverty, sex, and politics are discussed through the lens of Francie’s developing understanding of the world. The complexity of these themes and the rich historical portrait of early 1900s makes it an excellent novel for use in high school classrooms. Librarians may have to booktalk this classic to readers, but those who pick it up will be delighted. ( )
  alovett | Nov 20, 2014 |
“A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” is a simply told tale about life – the good, the bad, the ugly. When it was first published in 1943, it was lauded as being an “honest” book.

Francie (Frances) Nolan is the sweet, intelligent heroine and story teller of this honest tale – child of handsome but drunken Johnny and beautiful, thoughtful but hard-lucked Katie, and sister to one year younger Neeley (Cornelius). On the surface, there is poverty, alcoholism, unemployment, hunger, and death – the usual struggles of immigrant families (although Francie was third gen). Just below the surface is the richly woven fabric of love – complex, deep, strong-willed. This tale is enriched by Katie’s two sisters, Sisley and Evy (Eva), and Katie’s mother, Mary. Sisley, being childless for most parts of the book, played a large role in the children’s lives, filling them with love, treats, and entertaining gossip. The strength of the women in this book charms the reader.

The novel is divided into five books:
Book One – The introduction of Francie at the age of 11 in 1912. Life is hard around these Brooklyn blocks, and we get a picture of the difficult lives of everyone – from meals from stale bread to junk selling for pennies.
Book Two – In 1900, we learn the meeting of Johnny and Katie, showcasing an abundance of her will.
Book Three – Back to the “present”, the Nolans’ lives settle in and Francie is in a better school, enjoying her education. Alas tragedy strikes the family. And later, a new sister, Annie Laurie was born.
Book Four – Francie and Neeley both take jobs at the ages of 14 and 13. Having lied about her age to be 16, Francie became exceedingly successful in her newspapers reading/clipping job (old school data research!) U.S. enters World War I in 1917. Neeley returned to high school, while Francie lands a new job.
Book Five – Wrap-up. Francie is 17, and the family leaves the neighborhood for a better future.

I tend to enjoy tales of immigrants, and this was a gem too. To prevent lice and mumps: “Francie attended school stinking of garlic and kerosene oil. Everyone avoided her. In the crowded yard, there was always a cleared space around her. In crowded trolley cars, people huddled away from those Nolan children.” With a penny (to buy a sheet of paper and envelope), Francie attends a better school (still happens now). “Johnny wrote a note saying Francie was going to live with relatives at such and such an address and wanted a transfer… He signed his name and underlined it authoritatively.” Living on 6 loaves of stale bread: “The Nolans practically lived on that stale bread and what amazing things Katie could make from it! ... They lived mostly on these things made from stale bread, and condensed milk and coffee, onions, potatoes, and always the penny’s worth of something bought at the last minute, added for fillip.”

Like the Tree of Heaven that grows through the hardened concrete streets of Brooklyn, the will to live outweighs the circumstances. Without giving out the ending, I was a bit disappointed at the ending, which felt too easy of a path for Francie and her family. I shouldn’t be judgmental though. Given it was 1918 (and the book is semi-autobiographical), it is what it was.

Quotes:
On courting and falling in love:
“Feeling his arms around her and instinctively adjusting herself to his rhythm, Katie knew that he was the man she wanted. She’d ask nothing more than to look at him and to listen to him for the rest of her life. Then and there, she decided that those privileges were worth slaving for all her life.
Maybe that decision was her great mistake. She should have waited until some man came along who felt that way about her.”

On the reason to immigrate:
“There is here, what is not in the old country. In spite of hard unfamiliar things, there is here – hope.”

On a child’s pride and fierce protection for a younger sibling:
“’My brother is next. His arm is just as dirty as mine so don’t be surprised. And you don’t have to tell him. You told me.’ They stared at this bit of humanity who had become so strangely articulate. Francie’s voice went ragged with a sob. “You don’t have to tell him. Besides it won’t do no good. He’s a boy and he don’t care if he is dirty.’”

On nature’s balance – and hope:
“There had to be the dark and muddy waters so that the sun could have something to background its flashing glory.”

On truth and fancy – and the path of becoming a writer:
From a teacher to Francie: “When something comes up, you tell exactly how it happened but write down for yourself the way you think it should have happened. Tell the truth and write the story. Then you won’t get mixed up.”

On being 45 – yikes!
“The day will come, Francie, when you’re forty-five and have a shape like a bag of horses’ oats tied in the middle. Then you’ll look back and long for the old days when men wanted to pinch you.” ( )
1 vote varwenea | Sep 27, 2014 |
Having little time to read, this was a slow starter. Unlike contemporary fiction with the "page-turning" literary device I don't know the name of, Ms. Smith's book passed like time, some days more interesting than others. A portrait of Brooklyn in the early 1900's through the eyes of a young girl. I think I was reading the original edition with the cover illustration of the 'tree of heaven' growing up alongside a brick building with the bridge connecting it to Manhattan in the background. The pages were so worn and silky they were hard to turn. I couldn't help feeling like I was reading it along with all the others who'd checked it out from the library before me. All of us sharing this intimate history together as if it were our own. ( )
  hallywog | Sep 11, 2014 |
I'm sure this book was great in the 1940s but it was not that interesting to me in 2014. And I even grew up in Brooklyn, but that did not help. Characters seemed very one dimensional to me and the writing was a bit simplistic. ( )
  padmajoy | Sep 8, 2014 |
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