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The Silkworm by Robert Galbraith
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The Silkworm

by Robert Galbraith

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Cormoran Strike (2)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,480995,026 (3.91)171
  1. 10
    Case Histories: A Novel by Kate Atkinson (keywestnan)
    keywestnan: Like Robert Galbraith, aka J.K. Rowling, Kate Atkinson excels at creating interesting, complex but believable characters in her series of novels about Jackson Brodie, a cop-turned-private detective. Case Histories is the first in the series -- not my absolute favorite but they're all really good and I think you should start at the beginning.… (more)
  2. 00
    The Cuckoo's Calling by Robert Galbraith (Eowyn1)
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English (95)  Dutch (2)  French (1)  German (1)  All languages (99)
Showing 1-5 of 95 (next | show all)
Terrifically plotted sequel to Galbraith's (aka Rowling's) suspense debut "The Cuckoo's Calling", but the subject matter is rather gross (and I usually like dark suspense). All about the murder of an author whose final book was an over-the-top fantasy featuring his acquaintances' most secret sexual proclivities. Yuck - but so well written. ( )
  auntmarge64 | Aug 27, 2015 |
Another entertaining outing from Galbraith aka Rowling. I enjoyed the development of the relationship between Strike and Robin, and that's what preoccupied me, more than the story itself. The mystery involved a brutal murder, sexual deviance and the literary elites (self-styled, anyway), and in many ways it reminded me of episodes of CSI or similar procedurals. But I like those shows, so that was okay. I also wanted to yell at Strike to go have his poor amputated leg looked at, since it was giving him so much trouble, but, just like a man, he just ignored it. I find myself looking forward to the next outing in this series, which I'm finding surprisingly engaging. It's nice to see that the richest writer on the planet isn't sitting on her laurels but still cranking out worthwhile reads. ( )
  karenchase | Aug 20, 2015 |
After two very late nights, I finished the second in the Cormoran Strike Mystery crime series. Anyone who has read the HP series will know that J.K. Rowling can certainly spin a good yarn, and this one is no exception.

The wife of a missing novelist asks Private Investigator, Cormoran Strike, to find her missing husband and send him home. The author, Owen Quine, has done this disappearing act before, and she is a bit tired of it. She needs him at home to help with their mentally disabled daughter who is upset and misses her daddy. As Strike begins to investigate, he finds that there is more to Quine's disappearance than the wife realizes. Quine was about to publish a new novel full of libelous characterizations of everyone in the publishing industry with whom he is connected. Strike, who lost a leg as a soldier in Afghanistan, is in pain (the leg, his former girlfriend) and needs to rely more heavily on his smart and exceptionally talented assistant, Robin Ellacott, to solve this case. The characters and the plotting are excellent. The crime gruesome.

I love mystery/crime series, and for the most part, I don't get in on them before they've already been around for a few years. I've discovered the flaw in starting a new series right away. You have way too long to wait for the next book. :) Thankfully, I have several more series on the go to fill the gaps.

I understand that there are a total of seven novels planned for this series. I will be waiting in line for the rest of them if they are all as good as the first two.

Read July 2014 ( )
  NanaCC | Jul 26, 2015 |
The Silkworm was an engrossing, slow burn mystery novel. It’s the second in Rowling’s Cormoran Strike mystery series, but I don’t think you need to have read the first.

The novel starts with a woman appearing in Strike’s office, asking him to find her husband, the novelist Owen Quine. It turns out that Quine’s newest book contains horrible portrayals of many of the different people in his life. When Quine’s body is discovered, there’s no lack of suspects.

As you can probably guess by the description, The Silkworm deals heavily with London’s publishing circles, which makes me wonder how much Rowling is drawing on her own experience to create the backstabbing world of The Silkworm.

“If you want a lifetime of temporary alliances with peers who will glory in your every failure, write novels.”

Many of the characters of The Silkworm are deeply flawed (this is a murder mystery after all), and Rowling does a good job of making the different suspects memorable. Robin doesn’t get as large a role as I would have hoped, but there’s reasons to think that she’s moving towards more detective work. I also get the feeling that the series is moving towards a romantic relationship between Robin and Strike, and I really don’t want this to happen. However, given the presentation of Robin’s finance as jealous of Strike and an impediment to Robin’s desires to do detective work, I think it’s more than likely.

It was also sort of annoying how attractive woman kept throwing themselves at Strike. The book continually describes how he’s physically unattractive, and then there’s numerous women trying to get in bed with him?

I’d recommend The Silkworm to people looking for a slow burn mystery. Don’t expect it to be anything like Harry Potter.

Originally posted The Illustrated Page. ( )
  pwaites | Jul 25, 2015 |
Interesting novel. The plot takes you until the end. The main character very well described. Maybe the atmosphere is a bit sordid but nevertheless I liked the book very much. ( )
  sackville-west | Jul 14, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 95 (next | show all)
In the case of “The Silkworm,” it’s clear that two narrow genres of literature have been the source of inspiration: the old-fashioned detective story with its careful parsing of evidence; and the Jacobean play, renowned for its biting satire and dark fascination with betrayal and revenge, death and cruelty and corruption.
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Robert Galbraithprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Glenister, RobertNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wilson, SianCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
...blood and vengeance the scene, death the story,
a sword imbrued with blood, the pen that writes,
and the poet a terrible buskined tragical fellow,
with a wreath about his head of burning match instead of bays.

The Noble Spanish Soldier
Thomas Dekker
Dedication
To Jenkins, without whom... he knows the rest
First words
1
QUESTION
What dost thou feed on?
ANSWER
Broken sleep.
Thomas Dekker, The Noble Spanish Soldier
'Someone bloody famous,' said the hoarse voice on the end of the line, 'better've died, Strike.'
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0316206873, Hardcover)

When novelist Owen Quine goes missing, his wife calls in private detective Cormoran Strike. At first, Mrs. Quine just thinks her husband has gone off by himself for a few days-as he has done before-and she wants Strike to find him and bring him home.

But as Strike investigates, it becomes clear that there is more to Quine's disappearance than his wife realizes. The novelist has just completed a manuscript featuring poisonous pen-portraits of almost everyone he knows. If the novel were to be published, it would ruin lives-meaning that there are a lot of people who might want him silenced.

When Quine is found brutally murdered under bizarre circumstances, it becomes a race against time to understand the motivation of a ruthless killer, a killer unlike any Strike has encountered before... A compulsively readable crime novel with twists at every turn, THE SILKWORM is the second in the highly acclaimed series featuring Cormoran Strike and his determined young assistant, Robin Ellacott.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:11:37 -0400)

When novelist Owen Quine goes missing, his wife calls in private detective Cormoran Strike. At first, Mrs. Quine just thinks her husband has gone off by himself for a few days--as he has done before--and she wants Strike to find him and bring him home. But as Strike investigates, it becomes clear that there is more to Quine's disappearance than his wife realizes. The novelist has just completed a manuscript featuring poisonous pen-portraits of almost everyone he knows. If the novel were to be published, it would ruin lives--meaning that there are a lot of people who might want him silenced. When Quine is found brutally murdered under bizarre circumstances, it becomes a race against time to understand the motivation of a ruthless killer, a killer unlike any Strike has encountered before.… (more)

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