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Kiss of Broken Glass by Madeleine Kuderick
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Kiss of Broken Glass

by Madeleine Kuderick

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Find this review and more at On The Shelf!

I have read only two other books written in verse, but I have found I do enjoy the ones have read and look forward to reading more.

Kiss of Broken Glass deals with a hard topic – cutting – and what could drive a person to do it. I found Kenna to be very realistic and tortured, even if she didn’t want to admit it to herself. Through Kenna we learn about the drive and ache of her addiction to self harm and the author does a great job of making us feel that need right along with Kenna. The book spans only 72 hours, but in that short period, things become very eye opening. The book was an incredibly fast read, but it was also powerful.

The few characters we meet during the commitment weren’t around very long, but they each had their own special impact on Kenna. I especially liked Skylar and her honesty. She was very open about everything and I think that helped Kenna be more honest with herself. Donia was ok, but she was also someone who wanted to help Kenna keep cutting and didn’t seem like someone much into quitting self harm. I didn’t get to know Jag too well, but the little bit I did see of him I did like him.

I definitely enjoyed this book and look forward to more work from this author!

Well written, powerful, fast read, really puts you in the main character’s shoes. ( )
  VykiC37 | Oct 21, 2014 |
Having just finished reading recently, Ghosting by Edith Pattou, I was familiar with the verse writing. Which I am slowly coming around to liking this style of writing. The only downside to this style of writing is that if the characters in the story are not strong enough, then it can leave me unattached to them. Which kind of happened with this book. I was not fully invested with all of the characters. Although, I did find it intriguing on all the different reasons why people hurt themselves. It is sad and people need to be able to get help when they need it. Thank goodness for authors like Madeleine who are not afraid to write about these subject matters and help bring light to this serious topic. ( )
  Cherylk | Oct 12, 2014 |
Kenna is Bakered Acted–after being found deliberately cutting herself in the school bathroom she isKissOfBrokenGlass sent for psychiatric evaluation for 72 hours at Adler Boyce Pediatric Stabilization Facility, aka Attaboy,

In this novel-in-verse, Kenna describes her roommate, Donya, rail thin Skylar and cute Jag, both patients and several doctors and nurses. She describes how she started cutting to fit in, always feeling less loved by her mother than her perfect sister Avery. She describes her love for her little brother, Sean. She details why another student, Tara, turned her in to the principal…not necessarily for altruistic reasons.

Kiss of Broken Glass is a compelling novel, in part because it is well written. While not graphic, it gets its point across, the beginnings of cutting, the need to keep doing it, that fact that three days at Attaboy isn’t going to change much…but then again it might be a small start.

The second reason Kiss of Broken Glass is compelling is that it is written from personal experience. In the Author’s Note, Ms. Kiderick tells readers that her daughter was a cutter, exposed to this as early as sixth grade, a statistic I don’t want to even contemplate. Her daughter was caught and as she says “involuntarily committed under Florida’s Baker Act.”

Cut by Patricia McCormick was the first book I read on cutting and quite the book it was. It may very well set the standard by which other books are judged. However, since then there is Scars by Cheryl Rainfield, Wintergirls by Laurie Halse Anderson and now Kiss of Broken Glass, which certainly holds its own on this topic ( )
  EdGoldberg | Sep 10, 2014 |
Yeah. Don't feel like doing normal format. Goodreads update style:
rating 3.5

progress
(page 1 of 224)

I'm starting Kiss of Broken Glass: Okay... When I requested to begin with, it didn't say anything about being in verse.... But this is a subject close to my heart, so I am trying to go in with open mind, and go ahead and connect with kenna before I begin

page 9
4.0%
"KoBG (title) is tighter than some of the other poetry books I have read. Making it pretty easy for me to follow along and not be confused at what is actually going on. Still not my fave medium but I think I will be finishing"

page 14
6.0%
"Wondering what the Baker Act is its been mentioned several times... Said its Florida based. Thank you wikipedia... its an act that allows involuntary psych admission."

page 60 26.0% "Love her thought patterns and how realistic this book is. Shows how much she craves to cut and that it is something that buries in the mind and takes over life."

150 66.0% "Flying through. Love the group interaction and her and jag. Nothing major there, but still"

page 175 78.0% "Peer pressure sucks. It comes out her reasons for starting to cut... And the back of the book where it talks about she didn't have absent parents, no abuse, no sexual assault... Her reasons were different, and I can totally see how she could have felt like she had no other choice. Her friend Rennie took her under wing and helped her be in the popular circle, but its deeper than that."

page 210 93.0% "I loved the butterfly from another person in the ward. The premise was to draw a butterfly on wrists or where you cut and then name it. Makes it harder with a name to cut there in theory. Never heard of a strategy like that but thought it was beautiful."

page 223 99.0% "The ending is realistic. The book takes place in a span of 72 hours. So Kenna learned a few skills, and thought more about her reasonings. But there was no magic cure. She is sent home and told that relapse is normal... So we have hope that she has the skills to learn to stop cutting."

Overall, enjoyed this. The verse worked for me here and I came away feeling emotional but sense of hope.

Bottom Line: Surprised me that I connected to a main character in a book told in verse. ( )
  brandileigh2003 | Sep 4, 2014 |
I received this free eARC in exchange for my honest review.

When I first got this book, I wasn't sure what I was walking into. Sure it was about a girl cutting herself. But the way the author wrote this as if she actually knew what was going on? How it felt? How addicting it was? That blew my mind.

No, I've never done this before, nor do I want to ever in the future. The way Kenna couldn't stop thinking about it, wanting to do it all of the time, the way she would get a horrible urge to find ANYTHING to cut, it definitely showed me that this is an addiction and not just something people do for fun.

I was also shocked to see that it was in verse writing. I'm usually really horrible at reading books that are written this way, but the writing was phenomenal and I was able to read it like any book rather than a poem.

To say I was surprised by this book is an understatement. I wasn't expecting to like it as much as I did. And I definitely didn't think I would like Kenna, but somehow I did like her in the end. This book makes the reader think a lot, and think hard, about this subject. I know I won't forget it any time soon. ( )
  JeracaFite | Apr 6, 2014 |
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A tale told through evocative verse chronicles a mandatory seventy-two-hour psychiatric evaluation of a teen who has been caught cutting herself in an effort to feel alive.

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