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Beggars on Horseback by Martin Ross
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Beggars on Horseback

by Martin Ross

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Recently added byJoannaON, irkthepurist
humor (1) memoir (1) travel (1) Wales (1)

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 159048133X, Paperback)

Incredibly famous in their day, the aristocratic authors of Beggars on Horseback penned a total of fourteen books, including their immortal classic, “Some Experiences of an Irish R. M.” But few realised that “Martin Ross” and “E. Œ. Somerville” were actually the pen names of Violet Martin and Edith Somerville, two fun-loving, hard-riding, co-writing female Irish cousins. This is a real gem of a book, funny and moving by turns, with superb illustrations. The high-spirited young ladies decide to tour North Wales on horseback. Written in the first person, the “author” remains anonymous throughout, while her friend is given the pseudonym “Miss O’Flannigan.” Finding suitable horses was their first task: even in 1894 this was no easy matter, especially when they explained why they needed them: “We were conscious of social shrinkage as the work for which we required the ponies was explained; a fortnight’s road work in Wales, with the proviso that the animals would have to carry packs, held a suggestion of bagmen, not to say tinkers.” They were both avid horsewomen, and in due course they hired two ponies who have pride of place in this enchanting tale. After two wonderful weeks’ riding, the sad day arrives when they have to part with them, and send them back home by train. “When the final moment came, they suffered with dignity the farewell endearments of their aunts… It was impossible to explain to them that we found some difficulty in parting with them, friends but of a fortnight though they were.” This enchantingly funny but forgotten classic has been out of print for far too long, and we are pleased and proud to make it available again to another generation of horse-lovers.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:00:07 -0400)

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