HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

DNA of the Gods: The Anunnaki Creation of…
Loading...

DNA of the Gods: The Anunnaki Creation of Eve and the Alien Battle for…

by Chris H. Hardy Ph. D.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
4None1,664,912NoneNone

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
An in-depth study of humanity’s Anunnaki origins and the Anunnaki battle for an intelligent versus enslaved humanity

• Explains the genetic engineering of humanity by an Anunnaki scientist Ninmah

• Shows how the concepts of sin and the inferiority of women arose from Enlil’s will to keep humanity underdeveloped, clashing with Enki’s and Ninmah’s plan to make us equal in intelligence

• Reveals how humanity’s long history of conflict was shaped by the battle between Enki and his brother Enlil

Further developing the revolutionary work of Zecharia Sitchin, Chris Hardy shows that the “gods” of ancient myth, visitors from the planet Nibiru, created us using their own “divine” DNA--first through DNA extraction from their own ribs’ marrow and later by direct relations with early human females. Drawing upon multiple sacred texts, Hardy details the genetic engineering of humanity by Anunnaki scientist Ninmah, with the help of Enki and Hermes. She reveals how Ninmah’s first female human creation, Tiamat/Eve, contained more alien DNA than the earlier male one, Adamu, and how the biblical Noah represents the perfection of her work.

Examining the war between Anunnaki brothers Enki and Enlil, Hardy reveals how the concepts of sin and the inferiority of women were born out of Enlil’s attempts to enslave and then wipe out humanity, repeatedly thwarted by Enki and Ninmah. The author further explains how the sacred sexuality taught to humans--still seen in Tantric practice--became suppressed millennia later by the patriarchal concept of original sin and how innocent Eve took the blame for the expulsion from Eden and fall from Grace.

Showing that the god who created us was not the same god who expelled us from Eden, Hardy explains that there will be no apocalypse because the Good/Evil duality has never truly existed--it has been only enemy gods fighting and implicating humanity in the wake of their own competition for power. With a full psychological understanding of how the ancient “gods” have shaped humanity’s ongoing history of conflict, we can move beyond the framework of “(my) Good versus (your) Evil” imposed by Enlil and begin to steer our own planetary destiny.
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

"An in-depth study of humanity's Anunnaki origins and the Anunnaki battle for an intelligent versus enslaved humanity Explains the genetic engineering of humanity by an Anunnaki scientist Ninmah Shows how the concepts of sin and the inferiority of women arose from Enlil's will to keep humanity underdeveloped, clashing with Enki's and Ninmah's plan to make us equal in intelligence Reveals how humanity's long history of conflict was shaped by the battle between Enki and his brother Enlil Further developing the revolutionary work of Zecharia Sitchin, Chris Hardy shows that the "gods" of ancient myth, visitors from the planet Nibiru, created us using their own "divine" DNA--first through DNA extraction from their own ribs' marrow and later by direct relations with early human females. Drawing upon multiple sacred texts, Hardy details the genetic engineering of humanity by Anunnaki scientist Ninmah, with the help of Enki and Hermes. She reveals how Ninmah's first female human creation, Tiamat/Eve, contained more alien DNA than the earlier male one, Adamu, and how the biblical Noah represents the perfection of her work. Examining the war between Anunnaki brothers Enki and Enlil, Hardy reveals how the concepts of sin and the inferiority of women were born out of Enlil's attempts to enslave and then wipe out humanity, repeatedly thwarted by Enki and Ninmah. The author further explains how the sacred sexuality taught to humans--still seen in Tantric practice--became suppressed millennia later by the patriarchal concept of original sin and how innocent Eve took the blame for the expulsion from Eden and fall from Grace. Showing that the god who created us was not the same god who expelled us from Eden, Hardy explains that there will be no apocalypse because the Good/Evil duality has never truly existed--it has been only enemy gods fighting and implicating humanity in the wake of their own competition for power. With a full psychological understanding of how the ancient "gods" have shaped humanity's ongoing history of conflict, we can move beyond the framework of "(my) Good versus (your) Evil" imposed by Enlil and begin to steer our own planetary destiny"-- ""An in-depth study of humanity's Anunnaki origins and the Anunnaki battle for an intelligent versus enslaved humanity"--Provided by publisher"--… (more)

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: No ratings.

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 127,288,284 books! | Top bar: Always visible