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The Human Age: The World Shaped By Us by…
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The Human Age: The World Shaped By Us

by Diane Ackerman

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Must have been a fun book to write. I wonder about the funding. Ackerman seemed to be able to travel quite a bit to interview experts on their home turf, an aspect of nonfiction that always enhances readability. I was surprised and less interested in all the futurism and cultural aspects. Like science advancements and the state of the human race that seemed to have little bearing on our geo/ecological effect on the planet. Ackerman has skills and background. A doctorate in something where Carl Sagan was one of her advisors, for instance. She is optimistic and ready to wonder and the many marvels, which is fun. A little sexy even in her zest for life. I would have to look back again at the book to put my finger on what made up the book's narrative arc. ( )
  Mark-Bailey | Jul 1, 2017 |
I felt that the prose tended to be too be too flowery at times for the subject, sometimes to the point of distraction, but the subject and anecdotes of the book are interesting. ( )
  DLMorrese | Oct 14, 2016 |
Must have been a fun book to write. I wonder about the funding. Ackerman seemed to be able to travel quite a bit to interview experts on their home turf, an aspect of nonfiction that always enhances readability. I was surprised and less interested in all the futurism and cultural aspects. Like science advancements and the state of the human race that seemed to have little bearing on our geo/ecological effect on the planet. Ackerman has skills and background. A doctorate in something where Carl Sagan was one of her advisors, for instance. She is optimistic and ready to wonder and the many marvels, which is fun. A little sexy even in her zest for life. I would have to look back again at the book to put my finger on what made up the book's narrative arc. ( )
  torreyhouse | Jun 25, 2016 |
I was concerned this would be too depressing to finish. Wrong! Surprisingly cheerful book. Occasionally the writing styled palled, but for the most part I enjoyed the imaginative use of adjectives. AND here's a science book that is not over your head and not boring.
  revliz | Jul 22, 2015 |
This book, about the effects of humans on the earth, is broken into sections, which makes it both easier to understand and gives the reader a small break in the science. Ackerman does an excellent job of making the book approachable and understandable by the layperson, and her uses of her own life choices and effects on the earth neatly brings it all home to each of us. This was not a book that drove me to read it, but it was always interesting and very informative. ( )
  whymaggiemay | Apr 24, 2015 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0393240746, Hardcover)

“Our relationship with nature has changed . . . radically, irreversibly, but by no means all for the bad. Our new epoch is laced with invention. Our mistakes are legion, but our talent is immeasurable.”

Our finest literary interpreter of science and nature, Diane Ackerman is justly celebrated for her unique insight into the natural world and our place (for better and worse) in it.

In this landmark book, she confronts the unprecedented fact that the human race is now the single dominant force of change on the planet. Humans have “subdued 75 percent of the land surface, concocted a wizardry of industrial and medical marvels, strung lights all across the darkness.” We now collect the DNA of vanishing species in a “frozen ark,” equip orangutans with iPads, create wearable technologies and synthetic species that might one day outsmart us. Ackerman takes us on an exciting journey to understand this bewildering new reality, introducing us to many of the people and ideas now creating—perhaps saving—our future.

The Human Age is a beguiling, optimistic engagement with the earth-shaking changes now affecting every part of our lives and those of our fellow creatures—a wise book that will astound, delight, and inform intelligent life for a long time to come.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:19:52 -0400)

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