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Speak to Me: (And I Will Listen between the…
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Speak to Me: (And I Will Listen between the Lines)

by Karen English

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Showing 5 of 5
This was one of my favorite children’s books so far. I really enjoyed the different perspectives that the story was told through. Each poem was told from a different child. My favorite poem was “DAYDREAM, by Malcom”. This poem was about day dreaming and thinking about a new life. I also enjoyed the poem about going to the office in which the child knew how many steps it took to get to the office from his classroom. Another reason I enjoyed this story was because of the illustrations. Each page had its own poem and a corresponding illustration that matched what the poem was about. The third reason I enjoyed this story was because of the writing. I found just about every poem engaging and clear so that the reader could understand what was going on. For instance, one poem is about Rica writing about how her real father is coming to pick her up after school. You understand from the poem that her parents are separated. Overall, I felt the message was to show that you have to look between the lines of how a friend or student of yours is acting to see what is really going on.
  tricha11 | Apr 20, 2014 |
This book follows several different African-American students in a middle school. Each stundent has different poems that reflect what's happening to them at school. ( )
  Gabe77 | Apr 26, 2012 |
Six children express how they are feeling and thinking one school day. Each child has his/her own voice and style of expression.

The book would be useful in a discussion about self-expression and interpreting other people. ( )
  Jill.Barrington | Oct 5, 2011 |
This book was a bit hard to get into. The poetry breaks the thoughts into different lines and makes it hard to follow. Perhaps I just don't understand poetry very well. The stories were mostly not very interesting, but I did feel bad for the girl who is left out and the boy who is always in trouble.

This book could be used when teaching poetry, or looking at books that are written from multiple perspectives. ( )
  bluemopitz | Aug 11, 2010 |
I respect the post-modern format but don't love this book. The author is likely African-American, but she is not a child, and I have a hard time accepting that children would really write the way these characters 'write.'

Useful in any lesson on multicultural representation, both in the effectiveness in speak for ones own culture, and in the problems inherent in speaking for others. ( )
  didaly | Jun 30, 2010 |
Showing 5 of 5
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0374371563, Hardcover)

Six voices from an inner-city classroom

In a series of candid free-form poems, Karen English presents the thoughts of six third-grade children in one day and one classroom at an inner-city public school. Malcolm is the central observer, but also a dreamer. Rica has turned eight today, and her real father will be picking her up later. Brianna is upset because Rica has given over "best friend" status to Neecy. There's Lamont, who aspires to be teacher's pet, and Tyrell, a kid bound for trouble from the moment he arrives.

Inspired by her own experience as an elementary school teacher, Ms. English captures voices that reflect a range of emotion and interest children will easily identify with, and Amy June Bates's watercolors breathe pictorial life into the characters.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:55:17 -0400)

Describes events of one day at a San Francisco Bay Area school as perceived by different second-graders, from the observations of first to arrive on the playground to the walk home.

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