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Budding Magic (The O'Byrne Daughters) by L.…
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Budding Magic (The O'Byrne Daughters)

by L. S. Fayne

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If I'm honest, the covers of Budding Magic almost put me off offering to reading it. There isn't anything actually wrong with it. It just didn't particularly appeal to me, too many bright colors for my rather drab personality. The story did though, so I reminded myself of the old adage 'never judge a book by its cover,' and I'm glad I did. It's an engaging story that carries you along pleasantly. Or at least it does after chapter one of Budding Magic. I cried in the first chapter, yes the first chapter!

Each of the six sisters has a personality of their own, which can't be easy for a writer. You easily become attached and invested in their adventure. It is fun learning the Druadic lessons with them and seeing how Fayne describes all of the magical creatures. The language is distractingly modern for a story set in 1838, especially that of the O'Byrne sisters, but this is easily overlooked. If you like fairtale fare you'll like these books.

It is a testament to the O'Brynes that I enjoyed the story as much as I did despite having one of my number one literary pet peaves in it. This is when main characters are presented as more morally advanced than their peers because they adhere to normal modern civic mores. It comes through in little things like insisting on bathing regularly in a historical time period when hygiene was neither understood nor appreciated, or expecting fair labour (or gender) laws in what would otherwise be a feudal state. Express a desire to see change, sure, but surprise that others adhere to what would be the norm of the day, no. Like everyone else, the main characters would know no different. I generally find it smug and condescending, and Fayne's story is no exception. Despite this one major drawback for me, I really liked Budding Magic.

When all is said and done, the story of the Irish O’Bryne’s is one worth the read for those who are 14ish and up. There are a few sexual references, more often than not when a baddie needs to be seen as especially depraved. But there is no explicit sex or violence. It is well edited and easy to follo ( )
  SadieSForsythe | Feb 24, 2016 |
This book was challenging, because I needed for it to make sense that such a powerful, magical family couldn’t circumvent the Irish Potato Famine. When I wrote the series, Druantia’s Children, I hinted as to where their magic had come from. I became fascinated with the original seven sisters, and decided to go write about them. The problem was that when I hinted about them, I placed them in the time of the famine. I couldn’t change history, so created a way to explain their magic. Budding Magic is the first for this series. It starts with sadness, but soon the sisters are plunged into magic and mystery.
  lsfayne | Apr 16, 2014 |
If I'm honest, the covers of Budding Magic almost put me off offering to reading it. There isn't anything actually wrong with it. It just didn't particularly appeal to me, too many bright colors for my rather drab personality. The story did though, so I reminded myself of the old adage 'never judge a book by its cover,' and I'm glad I did. It's an engaging story that carries you along pleasantly. Or at least it does after chapter one of Budding Magic. I cried in the first chapter, yes the first chapter!

Each of the six sisters has a personality of their own, which can't be easy for a writer. You easily become attached and invested in their adventure. It is fun learning the Druadic lessons with them and seeing how Fayne describes all of the magical creatures. The language is distractingly modern for a story set in 1838, especially that of the O'Byrne sisters, but this is easily overlooked. If you like fairtale fare you'll like these books.

It is a testament to the O'Brynes that I enjoyed the story as much as I did despite having one of my number one literary pet peaves in it. This is when main characters are presented as more morally advanced than their peers because they adhere to normal modern civic mores. It comes through in little things like insisting on bathing regularly in a historical time period when hygiene was neither understood nor appreciated, or expecting fair labour (or gender) laws in what would otherwise be a feudal state. Express a desire to see change, sure, but surprise that others adhere to what would be the norm of the day, no. Like everyone else, the main characters would know no different. I generally find it smug and condescending, and Fayne's story is no exception. Despite this one major drawback for me, I really liked Budding Magic.

When all is said and done, the story of the Irish O’Bryne’s is one worth the read for those who are 14ish and up. There are a few sexual references, more often than not when a baddie needs to be seen as especially depraved. But there is no explicit sex or violence. It is well edited and easy to follow. ( )
  SadieSForsythe | Nov 21, 2012 |
Budding Magic by L S Fayne is Blooming Beautifully

Budding Magic by L S Fayne, the first book in the fantasy fiction series, is a wondrous and beautiful telling of the tale of the O’Byrne Daughters. The children of Aine and Keegan O’Byrne have all inherited the magic that runs through their lineage; this novel explores their lives during and after the passing of their parents. The cover does not do justice to the content. It is a magnificent tale, which is wonderfully written.

The title of main character is passed from parent to child and then shared by the daughters themselves, much like the magic running through the characters’ veins. Each character is painstakingly crafted with just enough description to create a vivid and elaborate image in the reader’s mind of this beautiful portion of Ireland and its inhabitants. This novel enfolds the reader in the tale and builds its world around each to place him or her at the heart of the story. Fayne has created a storyline, and the telling there of, that not only gives the reader a front row seat to the happenings, but pulls each into the tale to feel and be transported by its words.

The plot is highly developed and beautifully written. Each movement of the characters affects his or her surrounding landscape as if Aine herself had charmed the very land. The tale is straightforward, but far from plain. Many writers would stumble trying to create such an intricate tale, but Fayne does so seemingly effortlessly and the reader is all the better for it. From the Emerald Isles to the reader’s hands, this is magic not to be dismissed. ( )
  cmtruxler | Aug 19, 2012 |
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