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The Children of Men by P. D. James
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The Children of Men (1992)

by P.D. James

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,4631721,575 (3.56)260
  1. 90
    The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood (VictoriaPL)
    VictoriaPL: Another dystopian tale of a future world dealing with infertility.
  2. 30
    The Road by Cormac McCarthy (Larkken)
  3. 31
    The Ice People by Maggie Gee (imyril)
    imyril: A dystopian future struggling with infertility
  4. 20
    The Testament of Jessie Lamb by Jane Rogers (ramblingivy)
  5. 10
    The Unit by Ninni Holmqvist (vwinsloe)
  6. 10
    Greybeard by Brian W. Aldiss (Cecrow)
  7. 11
    The World Without Us by Alan Weisman (bibliobibuli)
    bibliobibuli: Would it actually be such a bad thing if the human race disappeared? Here's a portrait of a world being reclaimed by nature and gradually erasing all human traces.
  8. 11
    Sleep Donation by Karen Russell (bibliobibuli)
    bibliobibuli: Another dystopian read about a world where the human race is under threat - here from the inability to sleep anymore.
  9. 01
    The First Century After Beatrice by Amin Maalouf (inge87)
    inge87: Speculative fiction about a future where men can be permanently cured of having daughters.
  10. 01
    The Alteration by Kingsley Amis (devenish)
  11. 01
    Ark Baby by Liz Jensen (isabelx)
    isabelx: No more babies.
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» See also 260 mentions

English (170)  Spanish (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (172)
Showing 1-5 of 170 (next | show all)
The premise of this book is a fascinating one to explore, just not in this book. It was a slow plod that I thought would lead somewhere, but it never did. A big build up with a fizzle at the end. Anyway, nice descriptions and scene setting, leaden characters, slow plot, meh ending. That's why I gave it two and a half stars. YMMV ( )
1 vote MrsLee | Dec 16, 2018 |
I'll admit, I'm wondering if I didn't like the movie more. I'll freely admit that my enthusiasm for the book was dimmed by the narrator's obnoxious accent, though I wonder if he wasn't chosen to narrate this book BECAUSE of that accent. The main character, Theo, is from Surrey, and a scholar at Oxford, so that posh sound might've fit the author's vision best. In any case, it didn't work for me.

Still, I found the ending to be too...clear, somehow. Too precise. The film leaves the ending much murkier, less comforting, and that suits me better with my apocolyptic fiction. ( )
  Ubiquitine | Nov 24, 2018 |
Great beginning and a disappointing ending. ( )
  AngelaAndersen | Oct 30, 2018 |
If you've seen the movie and haven't read the book yet, prepare to have your mind blown. It is unbelievable that the movie and the book even share the same title. They are completely different. Honestly, if they had named the movie something different, I never would have connected it to this wonderful book. The book is amazing; I love dystopian lit, and this book has everything that makes a good dystopian novel. I feel that this book could definitely hold its own among books like 1984, We, and The Handmaid's Tale. ( )
  Borrows-N-Wants | Sep 22, 2018 |
The premise was fantastic, and I was well with the writing up until the second half of the book. Somewhere in the second half the characterization began to fall apart. I am all right reading books with unsympathetic main characters (think [b:The Magicians|6101718|The Magicians (The Magicians, #1)|Lev Grossman|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1313772941s/6101718.jpg|6278977] or [b:The Secret History|29044|The Secret History|Donna Tartt|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1327733397s/29044.jpg|221359]) but the characters have to be believable in their motivations and adhere to said motives. In the Alpha section of the book that really didn't happen. Theo's sudden switch into "darling" and "my dear" just wasn't believable, nor was Julian's attachment. What the hell happened?
( )
  Lepophagus | Jun 14, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 170 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (20 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
James, P.D.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Biavasco, AnnamariaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Guani, ValentinaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Palencar, John JudeCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Dedication
Again, to my daughters
Clare and Jane
who helped
First words
Friday 1 January 2021

Early this morning, 1 January 2021, three minutes after midnight, the last human being to be born on earth was killed in a pub brawl in a suburb of Buenos Aires, aged twenty-five years, two months and twelve days.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Book description
The human race has become infertile, and the last generation to be born is now adult. Civilization itself is crumbling as suicide and despair become commonplace. Oxford historian Theodore Faron, apathetic toward a future without a future, spends most of his time reminiscing. Then he is approached by Julian, a bright, attractive woman who wants him to help get her an audience with his cousin, the powerful Warden of England. She and her band of unlikely revolutionaries may just awaken his desire to live and they may also hold the key to survival for the human race.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0307279901, Paperback)

Told with P. D. James's trademark suspense, insightful characterization, and riveting storytelling, The Children of Men is a story of a world with no children and no future. The human race has become infertile, and the last generation to be born is now adult. Civilization itself is crumbling as suicide and despair become commonplace. Oxford historian Theodore Faron, apathetic toward a future without a future, spends most of his time reminiscing. Then he is approached by Julian, a bright, attractive woman who wants him to help get her an audience with his cousin, the powerful Warden of England. She and her band of unlikely revolutionaries may just awaken his desire to live . . . and they may also hold the key to survival for the human race.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:17:49 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

In 2021, with the human race becoming extinct because of the infertility of all males, Oxford historian Theodore Faron is drawn into the schemes of an unlikely group of revolutionaries out to save society.

» see all 10 descriptions

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Average: (3.56)
0.5 6
1 20
1.5 12
2 70
2.5 28
3 290
3.5 92
4 376
4.5 23
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