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The Children of Men by P. D. James
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The Children of Men (1992)

by P.D. James

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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4,1691671,203 (3.56)242
Recently added bychronic, jnoble82, calebminns87, LitaVore, Johnstateman, private library, ipburnell, sonoKoala
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» See also 242 mentions

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Showing 1-5 of 165 (next | show all)
if you want to read this book expecting the movie, put the book down and walk away. loosely based is the best way to describe the film version of pd James future world. I went in knowing it would be different. perhaps not as different as it ended up being but still, I knew the movie it was not. I did enjoy though, reading it far faster than I thought I would. Theo is your 'hero' though I think he would hesitant to call himself that. he is seemingly well aware of his faults which does work in his favor the further you get into the story when he does, at the age of 50, essentially, grow up. I'd recommend this book. give it a shot. you may surprise yourself . ( )
  jnoble82 | Mar 20, 2017 |
I picked up this book not knowing what to expect. And I was pleasantly surprised. It started a little slow for me initially but caught my interest and then BAM, I was hooked!

The subject of this book is based around Infertility of the human race amongst other things which seem not as important considering the fact that no more babies are being born. The world's population is rapidly declining and although there is drastic testing in place, there doesn't seem a way to stop extinction.

Theo Faron, a history teacher and cousin to the warden of England, is living his life quietly. The he meets this young woman Julian and her 4 friends who have their own ideas and plan to challenge the warden. Initially Theo doesn't want to get involved but a change in events leads him to get involved with 'The Five Fishes.'

I was able to guess most of the things that were happening prior to it occurring but this didn't stop me from enjoying it. I was a bit worried as I was getting to the climax of the book and there seemed to be very few pages and I wondered how it would end. The ending did leave me wanting a little more but overall a good book and I'm glad I read it. ( )
  Nataliec7 | Feb 3, 2017 |
It was an interesting premise. It was slow at first but picked up. This is a dystopian future where humanity can no longer procreate. There is a movie based on this book but the movie does not stick to the storyline, just uses the basic premise. ( )
  Dollinha | Dec 16, 2016 |
I love P.D. James' mystery novels, and knew I had to give this a try. Once again, James proves a brilliant writer.

This is not a light read, but it is a beautifully written one. The story takes place in a world where woman can no longer give birth, and the human population is dwindling. The world will soon be coming to an end.

Theo, a professor, is coming to grips with this through isolation, and keeping a record in his journal. But when a former student tracks him down, asking him to get in touch with his cousin, the Warden of England, Theo finds there is much more to what remains of the world than he originally believed in. ( )
  seasonsoflove | Nov 14, 2016 |
"Only on tape and records do we now hear the voices of children"
By sally tarbox on 6 September 2016
Format: Kindle Edition
My first read of a PD James book and, as I understand, her only non-detective based one.
This takes place in 2021, in a strange world where mankind has lost the ability to reproduce. I really enjoyed the first part of the novel as this strange - but I guess not impossible - scenario has to be dealt with by the remaining oldsters. As the government, led by Warden Xan Lyppiatt, tries to deal with the situation, we see the frail encouraged to commit suicide (with handsome payouts to their loved ones). Those living out in the country are leaving for towns where the services can be kept going longest, and there's psychological repercussions on the people, whether it's women buying dolls, celebrating their pets' giving birth or watching banal TV shows from years ago that show children.

The storyline features Theo Faren, a middle aged Oxford professor - and cousin of the warden. He becomes involved with an apparently Christian group, fighting against various despotic practices put in place by Lyppiatt.
This culminates in a road trip, and I rather lost interest at this point, not being entirely convinced by the members of the group.
PD James does make the reader think in the latter part, where there's a very clear Christian parallel in the events.
A very intriguing idea, but the earlier section was definitely the stronger.
*3.5 ( )
  starbox | Sep 5, 2016 |
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» Add other authors (20 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
James, P.D.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Biavasco, AnnamariaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Guani, ValentinaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Palencar, John JudeCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Again, to my daughters
Clare and Jane
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Friday 1 January 2021

Early this morning, 1 January 2021, three minutes after midnight, the last human being to be born on earth was killed in a pub brawl in a suburb of Buenos Aires, aged twenty-five years, two months and twelve days.
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Book description
The human race has become infertile, and the last generation to be born is now adult. Civilization itself is crumbling as suicide and despair become commonplace. Oxford historian Theodore Faron, apathetic toward a future without a future, spends most of his time reminiscing. Then he is approached by Julian, a bright, attractive woman who wants him to help get her an audience with his cousin, the powerful Warden of England. She and her band of unlikely revolutionaries may just awaken his desire to live and they may also hold the key to survival for the human race.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0307279901, Paperback)

Told with P. D. James's trademark suspense, insightful characterization, and riveting storytelling, The Children of Men is a story of a world with no children and no future. The human race has become infertile, and the last generation to be born is now adult. Civilization itself is crumbling as suicide and despair become commonplace. Oxford historian Theodore Faron, apathetic toward a future without a future, spends most of his time reminiscing. Then he is approached by Julian, a bright, attractive woman who wants him to help get her an audience with his cousin, the powerful Warden of England. She and her band of unlikely revolutionaries may just awaken his desire to live . . . and they may also hold the key to survival for the human race.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:17:49 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

In 2021, with the human race becoming extinct because of the infertility of all males, Oxford historian Theodore Faron is drawn into the schemes of an unlikely group of revolutionaries out to save society.

» see all 10 descriptions

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