HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Im Land der leeren Häuser by P. D.…
Loading...

Im Land der leeren Häuser (original 1992; edition 2002)

by P. D. James, Phyllis D. James, P. D. James (Author), Phyllis D. James (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,0701631,248 (3.55)236
Member:truller10
Title:Im Land der leeren Häuser
Authors:P. D. James
Other authors:Phyllis D. James, P. D. James (Author), Phyllis D. James (Author)
Info:Scherz (2002), Taschenbuch
Collections:Gelesen [2011]
Rating:1/2
Tags:None

Work details

The Children of Men by P.D. James (1992)

  1. 80
    The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood (VictoriaPL, sturlington)
    VictoriaPL: Another dystopian tale of a future world dealing with infertility.
  2. 30
    The Ice People by Maggie Gee (imyril)
    imyril: A dystopian future struggling with infertility
  3. 30
    The Road by Cormac McCarthy (Larkken)
  4. 20
    The Testament of Jessie Lamb by Jane Rogers (ramblingivy)
  5. 10
    The World Without Us by Alan Weisman (bibliobibuli)
    bibliobibuli: Would it actually be such a bad thing if the human race disappeared? Here's a portrait of a world being reclaimed by nature and gradually erasing all human traces.
  6. 10
    Sleep Donation by Karen Russell (bibliobibuli)
    bibliobibuli: Another dystopian read about a world where the human race is under threat - here from the inability to sleep anymore.
  7. 00
    The Unit by Ninni Holmqvist (vwinsloe)
  8. 00
    Greybeard by Brian W. Aldiss (Cecrow)
  9. 00
    The First Century After Beatrice by Amin Maalouf (inge87)
    inge87: Speculative fiction about a future where men can be permanently cured of having daughters.
  10. 00
    The Alteration by Kingsley Amis (devenish)
  11. 00
    Ark Baby by Liz Jensen (isabelx)
    isabelx: No more babies.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 236 mentions

English (161)  Spanish (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (163)
Showing 1-5 of 161 (next | show all)
"Only on tape and records do we now hear the voices of children"
By sally tarbox on 6 September 2016
Format: Kindle Edition
My first read of a PD James book and, as I understand, her only non-detective based one.
This takes place in 2021, in a strange world where mankind has lost the ability to reproduce. I really enjoyed the first part of the novel as this strange - but I guess not impossible - scenario has to be dealt with by the remaining oldsters. As the government, led by Warden Xan Lyppiatt, tries to deal with the situation, we see the frail encouraged to commit suicide (with handsome payouts to their loved ones). Those living out in the country are leaving for towns where the services can be kept going longest, and there's psychological repercussions on the people, whether it's women buying dolls, celebrating their pets' giving birth or watching banal TV shows from years ago that show children.

The storyline features Theo Faren, a middle aged Oxford professor - and cousin of the warden. He becomes involved with an apparently Christian group, fighting against various despotic practices put in place by Lyppiatt.
This culminates in a road trip, and I rather lost interest at this point, not being entirely convinced by the members of the group.
PD James does make the reader think in the latter part, where there's a very clear Christian parallel in the events.
A very intriguing idea, but the earlier section was definitely the stronger.
*3.5 ( )
  starbox | Sep 5, 2016 |
This is not so much science fiction as 'sociological fiction', constructed around one simple premise: for reasons inexplicable to science, all men on earth suddenly go sterile one day in 1995. Flash forward to 2021, and it is a story about the repercussions of twenty-five years of childlessness on politics, on religion, on day-to-day living. The novel takes place in Britain, which is said to be managing better than most countries; we don't really know, since we aren't shown any others. 'Better' here means draconian sentencing for lawbreakers, an extended welfare state, and moving into the bedrooms of the nation in search of hope.

The narrator is a university professor who has witnessed the gradual death of education, and his marriage. Some of the chapters are his journal entries, the rest in third-person, but what's happening plot-wise is not nearly so important or interesting as what's happened (and is happening) to society. This is about the end of human life as it goes out with a whimper, not a bang, and how that whimpering might unfold, as chilling as any dystopian novel. The story isn't much and its ending is less, but the mood and lessons it imparts stick with you. In the vein of not knowing the value of something until it's gone, this novel spotlights the importance of youth, of parenting, of our raising succeeding generations despite all the mess, noise and inconvenience. ( )
  Cecrow | May 16, 2016 |
This is a pretty philosophical and extremely British book with digressions on politics, theological implications, and moral and ethical tests of its characters and readers. While the plot and the action move the story along quickly, this is no sweaty Clive Owen action-filled story like the film. Wikipedia tells me that the late P.D. James was pleased with the film version even though it was so different from her original novel, and I can see why she liked it. It captures the world she created, but comes at it in a way that plays better on the screen. The novel, on the other hand, is the perfect way to explore the cold, intellectual, privileged mind of Theo and experience the slow warming and opening that he undergoes as he becomes more and more involved with Julian and her friends. Literary science fiction doesn't always work for me, but in this case, James really pulls it off. There is a lot to think about here, and it's a rewarding read.

[full review here: http://spacebeer.blogspot.com/2016/04/the-children-of-men-by-pd-james-1992.html ] ( )
  kristykay22 | Apr 10, 2016 |
The Children of Men - P.D. James (241 pages)

The year is 2021, and the human race is - quite literally - coming to an end. Since 1995 no babies have been born, because in that year all males unexpectedly became infertile. Great Britain is ruled by a dictator, and the population is inexorably growing older. Theodore Faron, Oxford historian and ,incidentally, cousin of the all-powerful Warden of England, watches in growing despair as society gradually crumbles around him, giving way to strange faiths and cruelties: prison camps mass organized euthanasia, roving bands of thugs. Then suddenly, Faron is drawn into the plans of an unlikely group of revolutionaries. His passivity is shattered, and the action begins with the discovery of a pregnant woman.
  bostonwendym | Mar 3, 2016 |
Great read!! I had NO idea how completely different the book was from the movie, but it was a pleasant surprise. ( )
  kosana | Jan 21, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 161 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (20 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
James, P.D.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Biavasco, AnnamariaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Guani, ValentinaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Palencar, John JudeCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
Again, to my daughters
Clare and Jane
who helped
First words
Friday 1 January 2021

Early this morning, 1 January 2021, three minutes after midnight, the last human being to be born on earth was killed in a pub brawl in a suburb of Buenos Aires, aged twenty-five years, two months and twelve days.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
The human race has become infertile, and the last generation to be born is now adult. Civilization itself is crumbling as suicide and despair become commonplace. Oxford historian Theodore Faron, apathetic toward a future without a future, spends most of his time reminiscing. Then he is approached by Julian, a bright, attractive woman who wants him to help get her an audience with his cousin, the powerful Warden of England. She and her band of unlikely revolutionaries may just awaken his desire to live and they may also hold the key to survival for the human race.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0307279901, Paperback)

Told with P. D. James's trademark suspense, insightful characterization, and riveting storytelling, The Children of Men is a story of a world with no children and no future. The human race has become infertile, and the last generation to be born is now adult. Civilization itself is crumbling as suicide and despair become commonplace. Oxford historian Theodore Faron, apathetic toward a future without a future, spends most of his time reminiscing. Then he is approached by Julian, a bright, attractive woman who wants him to help get her an audience with his cousin, the powerful Warden of England. She and her band of unlikely revolutionaries may just awaken his desire to live . . . and they may also hold the key to survival for the human race.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:17:49 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

In 2021, with the human race becoming extinct because of the infertility of all males, Oxford historian Theodore Faron is drawn into the schemes of an unlikely group of revolutionaries out to save society.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 10 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
47 avail.
85 wanted
5 pay8 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.55)
0.5 5
1 22
1.5 12
2 67
2.5 25
3 273
3.5 87
4 347
4.5 23
5 141

Audible.com

4 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 109,225,530 books! | Top bar: Always visible