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Children of Sanchez by Oscar Lewis
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Children of Sanchez (1961)

by Oscar Lewis

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An anthropological documentary on the lives of four children and their father in the Mexico City slums relies on the words of the five protagonists themselves.
  antimuzak | Dec 7, 2005 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0394702808, Paperback)

A pioneering work from a visionary anthropologist, The Children of Sanchez is hailed around the world as a watershed achievement in the study of poverty—a uniquely intimate investigation, as poignant today as when it was first published.
 
It is the epic story of the Sánchez family, told entirely by its members—Jesus, the 50-year-old patriarch, and his four adult children—as their lives unfold in the Mexico City slum they call home. Weaving together their extraordinary personal narratives, Oscar Lewis creates a sympathetic but ultimately tragic portrait that is at once harrowing and humane, mystifying and moving.
 
An invaluable document, full of verve and pathos, The Children of Sanchez reads like the best of fiction, with the added impact that it is all, undeniably, true.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:21:50 -0400)

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Anthropologist's tape-recorded documentary in which each of five members of a slum-dwelling Mexico City family tells about their lives.Once or twice in every generation a scientific work appears which has the immediacy and force of great literature. The Children of Sanchez is such a book. It brings us in touch with the lives of its subjects in such a way that the reader is drawn into their world as if he were reading a great novel. This is an intimate account of an actual family from the slums of Mexico City. The story they tell is in their own words. The reader learns not only what it is like to grow up in a one-room home in a slum tenement in the heart of a great modern city, but, insofar as the lives in this book may be generalized, about the culture of poverty throughout the world--the culture shared by 80% of the world's people. The lives of the Sanchez family reveal a world of violence and death, of suffering and brutality, of broken homes and the cruelty of the poor to the poor. But they reveal, too, an intensity of feeling and human warmth, a sense of individuality, a capacity for joy, a hope for a better life, a desire for sympathy and love, a readiness to share the little they possess, and the courage to carry on in the face of great adversity.--From publisher description.… (more)

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