HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Authority Vol. 2: Under New Management…
Loading...

The Authority Vol. 2: Under New Management (edition 2000)

by Warren Ellis

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
387627,743 (3.85)None
Member:brianeisley
Title:The Authority Vol. 2: Under New Management
Authors:Warren Ellis
Info:Wildstorm (2000), Paperback, 192 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:superhero, comics

Work details

The Authority: Under New Management by Warren Ellis

None

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
The title’s probably the smartest thing about this, working as it does on the level of story and creative context, with a change in leadership and also in the creative team handling the book at the halfway point of this volume. Ellis’ last stand on the title is pretty much as bold a concept as you can get – The Authority go up against God, who’s actually rather annoyed at humanity simply for existing. Plenty of carnage, but it’s all too straightforward for my tastes - once God’s power is established there’s no real twist nor tension, Ellis content to coast on the gauchely iconoclastic central idea.

Mark Millar’s take is, as usual, sadistically gleeful and hyperactive. I’ve never been a particular fan, though I concede that there’s a compelling energy to his best work. It’s a logical extension of Ellis’ run, particularly with regard to the character who sparks (or rather quantums) the whole story. There’s a sly dig at the origins of one of Marvel’s most famous characters and the resolution to the story actually surprised me given Millar’s tendencies and the way superhero narratives usually work. It achieves its aim of feeling like a fresh beginning for the title, but as such it makes this feel like an episode of the story rather than a satisfying tale within its own right. That though, is hardly Millar’s fault – as Alan Moore’s pointed out it’s near impossible to make a novel out of what’s designed to be an ongoing monthly title. Perhaps then, it’d have been more creatively sensible to collect Ellis’s run as one graphic novel and Millar’s run as another. Ultimately an entertaining but deeply flawed hybrid. ( )
  JonArnold | Apr 24, 2014 |
A clever and amusing graphic novel collecting a series about a team of superheroes. There are some pretty obvious parallels to classic characters such as Superman and Batman, of course, with a few slightly-too-clever "twists" thrown in. It's reasonably well-written, the art is good, the concepts are played with amusingly...but I couldn't help but note that there wasn't too much that was terribly original in it.

Still, a good-enough, workmanlike job.

Update: There's one odd thing about this book. In several cases there are instances of "shocking" violence, which you probably won't actually be shocked by unless you haven't read comics or watched any R-rated movies in the last twenty years. They mostly involve heads being exploded, ripped off, or cut off. For some reason, they're mostly blurred and inked in monotone - in other words, in such a way as to tone them way down. It's actually hard to figure out what's happening.

It reminds me of TV censorship, when shows that were originally broadcast on HBO are re-run on a broadcast channel. The result is always rather painful and lame. It also feels a bit patronizing; if someone's head is going to explode, have the balls to be up-front about it! And if you can't stomach writing or drawing a scene like that (or can't get it past DC censors), change it altogether. I don't particularly object to head-explosions, but they're not exactly the be-all and end-all of shock. ( )
  PMaranci | Apr 3, 2013 |
The art in the second half of this volume simply didn't work for me, even if the plot definitely did. This is, of course, a matter of taste, so if you've seen (and enjoyed) Quietly's work before, you should enjoy his art here, too. ( )
  misura | Aug 14, 2012 |
  www.snigel.nu | Nov 17, 2007 |
Outer Dark (Cool but again fairly simple plot. Jenny Sparks dies killing God on the Millenial New Year.)
-
The Nativity (Raw, funny, outrageous, cool.) ( )
  ragwaine | Dec 21, 2006 |
Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (3)

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

"The 20th century comes to a close, and so does the life of Authority spearhead Jenny Sparks, The Spirit of the 20th Century. But she goes out fighting. In "Outer Dark," the team faces a godlike alien invader, back to the earth after eons, and ready to destroy the world. In "The Nativity" a now Jennyless team finds itself world celebrities, as well as world policemen. And their first challenge is to stop a diabolical super-genius with a legion of super-soldiers as he attempts to capture Jenny Quantum, the Spirit of the Twenty-First Century, and mold her to suit his own nefarious plans." -- (p.4) of cover.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
17 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.85)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5 4
3 25
3.5 9
4 42
4.5 4
5 20

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 91,698,734 books! | Top bar: Always visible