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The Marriage Game by Alison Weir
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The Marriage Game (2014)

by Alison Weir

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Elizabeth has been one of my favorite historical people. It was interesting to think about how seeing the fates of her stepmothers affected Elizabeth's view on marriage. ( )
  nx74defiant | Aug 25, 2017 |
Elizabeth has ascended to the throne of England but she is not yet married. Her council and the country all feel that a woman cannot possibly rule on her own and that the succession needs to be guaranteed through marriage and the begetting of children. However Elizabeth nurses a secret from her young, abused and taken advantage of by her stepfather, and having seen two of her stepmothers die in childbirth she is terrified of sex and its consequences. In addition the only man she lusts after is already married and a choice of partner unacceptable to all, Robert Dudley. Whilst not keen on the idea of marriage Elizabeth allows the council and the courts of Europe to put forward suitors for her hand - this is the Marriage Game.

Alison Weir is an erudite scholar of the late middle ages and Tudor period and she has only relatively recently turned to writing fiction. This book is rich in period history, knowledge of life, politics and social mores is very much to the front. The imagined dialogue is less so and therefore although very good, this book was also a bit of a struggle! ( )
  pluckedhighbrow | Jun 26, 2017 |
I'm not going to finish this one. Not the greatest offering from this author. Reads more like a harlequin romance than a work of historical fiction.
  Iambookish | Dec 14, 2016 |
This novel was so redundant. The nonfiction version of Weir's books is far more interesting. I also really dislike that she uses story lines that she adamantly insists as a historian did not happen. Since far more people read the fiction version, it frustrates me that a historian would plant these incorrect details to be assumed as truth because they are coming from a respected historical authority. So much misinformation is taught and excepted as fact when they have been proven wrong...don't get me started on the Magna Carta! ( )
  Jen.ODriscoll.Lemon | Jan 23, 2016 |
This novel was so redundant. The nonfiction version of Weir's books is far more interesting. I also really dislike that she uses story lines that she adamantly insists as a historian did not happen. Since far more people read the fiction version, it frustrates me that a historian would plant these incorrect details to be assumed as truth because they are coming from a respected historical authority. So much misinformation is taught and excepted as fact when they have been proven wrong...don't get me started on the Magna Carta! ( )
  Jen.ODriscoll.Lemon | Jan 23, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0345511913, Hardcover)

Bestselling historian Alison Weir brings all her knowledge of Elizabeth I to vivid life in a novel of intrigue, sex, plots, mysteries and tragedies, amid all the colour and pageantry of the Tudor court. Their affair is the scandal of Europe. Queen Elizabeth presents herself as the Virgin Queen but cannot resist her dashing but married Master of Horse, Lord Robert Dudley. Many believe them to be lovers, and there are scurrilous rumours that Elizabeth is no virgin at all. The formidable young Queen is regarded by most of Christendom as a bastard, a heretic and a usurper, yet many princes covet Tudor England and seek her hand in marriage. Under mounting pressure to take a husband, Elizabeth encourages their advances without ever committing; a delicate, politically-fraught balancing act which becomes known as 'The Marriage Game'. But treading this dangerous line with Robert Dudley, the son and grandson of traitors, could cost her the throne...Played out amidst the splendour of the Tudor court and the most famous events of a great age, The Marriage Game is a dramatic, complex and deeply poignant tale of intrigue, love and loss. At its heart is our greatest Queen and the emotional truth of one of history's most extraordinary love affairs.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:21:54 -0400)

"In this compelling novel of Tudor drama and suspense, acclaimed author Alison Weir brings to life one of England's most scandalous royal love affairs: the romance between the "Virgin Queen" Elizabeth I and her courtier Lord Robert Dudley. Only twenty-five and newly crowned, Elizabeth vows to rule the country as both queen and king. But her counselors continually press her to form an advantageous marriage and produce an heir. Though none of the suitors have yet worked their way to her throne, the dashing--though married--Lord Robert lays claim to Elizabeth's heart. Their flagrant flirting, their unescorted outings, and the appointment of Lord Robert to Master of Horse inspire whispers through the court, and even rumors that Elizabeth has secretly given birth to Lord Robert's child. Events take a dark turn when Robert's wife is found dead. Universal shock is followed by accusations of murder. Despite the scandal, Elizabeth and Robert manage to navigate the choppy political, economic, and religious waters around them. But the greatest obstacle to marriage between the Queen and her true love may come not from outside forces, but from within. With intricate period detail and captivating prose, Alison Weir explores one of history's most provocative "Did they or didn't they?" debates. The Marriage Game maneuvers through the alliances, duplicities, intrigue, and emotions of a woman intent on sovereignty--over her country and herself. Praise for Alison Weir A Dangerous Inheritance "A juicy mix of romance, drama and Tudor history. pure bliss for today's royal watchers."--Ladies' Home Journal "Highly compelling [with] plenty to keep readers enthralled."--Historical Novel Review Captive Queen "Should be savored. Weir wastes no time captivating her audience."--Seattle Post-Intelligencer "Stunning. As always, Weir renders the bona fide plot twists of her heroine's life with all the mastery of a thriller author, marrying historical fact with licentious fiction."--The Denver Post The Lady Elizabeth "Intrigue and maneuverings. Scandal. Schemers and innocents put to death. [This] history of Tudor England is an engrossing story. Weir marries conjecture with what is known about the life of Elizabeth I from childhood to coronation, and it makes for ripping good reading."--Milwaukee Journal Sentinel "A compelling, even irresistible, read."--Booklist (starred review)"--… (more)

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