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John Dewey and Continental Philosophy

by Paul Fairfield (Editor)

Other authors: Barry Allen (Contributor), Richard J. Bernstein (Contributor), Antonio Calcagno (Contributor), Jim Garrison (Contributor), James A. Good (Contributor)8 more, James Scott Johnston (Contributor), Colin Koopman (Contributor), Joseph Margolis (Contributor), C.G. Prado (Contributor), Tom Rockmore (Contributor), Sandra B. Rosenthal (Contributor), Inna Semetsky (Contributor), David Vessey (Contributor)

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"John Dewey and Continental Philosophy" provides a rich sampling of exchanges that could have taken place long ago between the traditions of American pragmatism and continental philosophy had the lines of communication been more open between Dewey and his European contemporaries. Since they were not, Paul Fairfield and thirteen of his colleagues seek to remedy the situation by bringing the philosophy of Dewey into conversation with several currents in continental philosophical thought, from post-Kantian idealism and the work of Friedrich Nietzsche to twentieth-century phenomenology, hermeneutics, and poststructuralism. This unique volume includes discussions comparing and contrasting Dewey with the German philosophers G. W. F. Hegel, Friedrich Nietzsche, Martin Heidegger, and Hans-Georg Gadamer on such topics as phenomenology, naturalism, organicism, contextualism, and poetry. Others investigate a series of connections between Dewey and contemporary French philosophy, including the notions of subjectivity, education, and the critique of modernity in Michel Foucault; language and politics in Jacques Derrida; and the concept of experience in Gilles Deleuze. Also discussed is the question of whether we can identify traces of "Bildung" in Dewey s writings on education, and pragmatism s complex relation to twentieth-century phenomenology and hermeneutics, including the problematic question of whether Heidegger was a pragmatist in any meaningful sense. Presented in intriguing pairings, these thirteen essays offer different approaches to the material that will leave readers with much to deliberate. " John Dewey and Continental Philosophy" demonstrates some of the many connections and opportunities for cross-traditional thinking that have long existed between Dewey and continental thought, but have been under-explored. The intersection presented here between Dewey s pragmatism and the European traditions makes a significant contribution to continental and American philosophy and will spur new and important developments in the American philosophical debate. "… (more)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Fairfield, PaulEditorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Allen, BarryContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bernstein, Richard J.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Calcagno, AntonioContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Garrison, JimContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Good, James A.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Johnston, James ScottContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Koopman, ColinContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Margolis, JosephContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Prado, C.G.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Rockmore, TomContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Rosenthal, Sandra B.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Semetsky, InnaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Vessey, DavidContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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"John Dewey and Continental Philosophy" provides a rich sampling of exchanges that could have taken place long ago between the traditions of American pragmatism and continental philosophy had the lines of communication been more open between Dewey and his European contemporaries. Since they were not, Paul Fairfield and thirteen of his colleagues seek to remedy the situation by bringing the philosophy of Dewey into conversation with several currents in continental philosophical thought, from post-Kantian idealism and the work of Friedrich Nietzsche to twentieth-century phenomenology, hermeneutics, and poststructuralism. This unique volume includes discussions comparing and contrasting Dewey with the German philosophers G. W. F. Hegel, Friedrich Nietzsche, Martin Heidegger, and Hans-Georg Gadamer on such topics as phenomenology, naturalism, organicism, contextualism, and poetry. Others investigate a series of connections between Dewey and contemporary French philosophy, including the notions of subjectivity, education, and the critique of modernity in Michel Foucault; language and politics in Jacques Derrida; and the concept of experience in Gilles Deleuze. Also discussed is the question of whether we can identify traces of "Bildung" in Dewey s writings on education, and pragmatism s complex relation to twentieth-century phenomenology and hermeneutics, including the problematic question of whether Heidegger was a pragmatist in any meaningful sense. Presented in intriguing pairings, these thirteen essays offer different approaches to the material that will leave readers with much to deliberate. " John Dewey and Continental Philosophy" demonstrates some of the many connections and opportunities for cross-traditional thinking that have long existed between Dewey and continental thought, but have been under-explored. The intersection presented here between Dewey s pragmatism and the European traditions makes a significant contribution to continental and American philosophy and will spur new and important developments in the American philosophical debate. "

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