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The History of the Peloponnesian War by…
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The History of the Peloponnesian War

by Thucydides

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
5,32535826 (4)2 / 107
  1. 60
    The Histories by Herodotus (Voracious_Reader)
  2. 30
    The Histories by Polybius (timspalding)
    timspalding: Thucydides, Herodotus, Polybius—the rest is secondary.
  3. 10
    Thucydides by Walter Robert Connor (wildbill)
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English (31)  Dutch (3)  Spanish (1)  All (35)
Showing 1-5 of 31 (next | show all)
Thucydides is essential reading, but I recommend THE LANDMARK THUCYDIDES unless you are already well-versed in Greek history. It provides all the context you need to truly understand what's going on. ( )
  datrappert | Oct 17, 2016 |
Thank goodness Thucydides died when he did. Though it would have been interesting to see some possible cynicism about the war, I don't think I could have handled another three hundred pages. I found many of the speeches and the use of rhetoric interesting, but overall the book was so dense that it wasn't worth it. ( )
  serogers02 | Aug 27, 2016 |
Cobbled together from musty scraps of parchment, scribbled marginalia and fragments of wax tablets, Thucydides’ account of a war among ancient Greek city-states is historical fiction of profound political insight and psychological acumen. In order to tell his story, he invents characters and scenes for which we have no corroborating sources, and fabricates dialogue and ceremonial oration that encapsulate his own biased perceptions. He provides no bibliography or notes to support his “history,” but Thucydides gets credit for formulating a conceptual scheme that has been deployed by the chroniclers of war ever since. ( )
  HectorSwell | Mar 3, 2016 |
A superb translation with equally good critical apparatus. This is the edition I would recommend if you want to read this history. ( )
1 vote Lukerik | May 18, 2015 |
"your Latin & Greek should be kept up assiduously by reading at spare hours: and, discontinuing the desultory reading of the schools. I would advise you to undertake a regular course of history & poetry in both languages, in Greek, go first thro’ the Cyropaedia, and then read Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon’s Hellenies & Anabasis, Arrian’s Alexander, & Plutarch’s lives, for prose reading: Homer’s Iliad & Odyssey, Euripides, Sophocles in poetry, & Demosthenes in Oratory; alternating prose & verse as most agreeable to yourself." - Thomas Jefferson to Francis Eppes, 6 Oct. 1820

"In all cases I prefer original author to compilers. for a course of Antient history therefore, of Greece and Rome especially, I should advise the usual suite of Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Diodorus, Livy, Caesar, Suetonius, Tacitus and Dion, in their originals, if understood, and in translations if not." - Thomas Jefferson to George W. Lewis, 25 Oct. 1825
  ThomasJefferson | Jul 21, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 31 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (197 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
ThucydidesAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Baldwin, Hanson W.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Crawley, RichardTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Finley, M. I.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Flashar, HellmutNachwortsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gavorse, JosephIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Grene, DavidEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hadas, MosesIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hammond, MartinTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hanson, Victor DavisIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hobbes, ThomasTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jowett, BenjaminTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Landmann, Georg P.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Radice, BettyTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rhodes, P. J.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Smith, WilliamTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Strassler, Robert B.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vidal-Naquet, PierreForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Warner, RexTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Thucydides the Athenian wrote the history of the war fought between Athens and Sparta, beginning the account at the very outbreak of the war, in the belief that it was going to be a great war and more worth writing about than any of those which had taken place in the past.
Quotations
The Corcyraeans...went to the sanctuary of Hera and persuaded about fifty men to take their trial, and condemned them all to death. The mass of the suppliants who had refused to do so, on seeing what was taking place, slew each other there on the consecrated ground; some hanged themselves upon the trees, and others destroyed themselves as they were severally able. During seven days...the Corcyraeans were engaged in butchering those of their fellow-citizens whom they regarded as their enemies: and although the crime imputed was that of attempting to put down the democracy, some were slain also for private hatred, others by their debtors because of the moneys owed to them. Death thus raged in every shape; and as usually happens at such times, there was no length to which violence did not go; sons were killed by their fathers, and suppliants dragged from the altar or killed upon it, while some were even walled up in the temple of Dionysus and died there.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0140440399, Paperback)

Written four hundred years before the birth of Christ, this detailed contemporary account of the struggle between Athens and Sparta stands an excellent chance of fulfilling the author's ambitious claim that the work "was done to last forever." The conflicts between the two empires over shipping, trade, and colonial expansion came to a head in 431 b.c. in Northern Greece, and the entire Greek world was plunged into 27 years of war. Thucydides applied a passion for accuracy and a contempt for myth and romance in compiling this exhaustively factual record of the disastrous conflict that eventually ended the Athenian empire.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:24:56 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

Presents an English translation of the Greek text which provides an account of the people and events involved in the long, fifth-century conflict between Athens and Sparta, and includes notes, a glossary, and other resources.

» see all 6 descriptions

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