HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Shakespeare Notebooks by James Goss
Loading...

The Shakespeare Notebooks

by James Goss, Jonathan Morris, Julian Richards, Justin Richards, William Shakespeare1 more, Matthew Sweet

Other authors: Mike Collins (Illustrator)

Series: Doctor Who

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
913199,461 (3.4)6

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 6 mentions

Showing 3 of 3
If you need an idea of how big Doctor Who is these days it’s this; an indulgent cash cow based around a single joke which’ll amuse the overlap of a Venn diagram of Who fans and Shakespearians. It’s partially written by the range consulting editor and his son - I’ll forebear to comment on whether the latter was a commission of merit as the individual pieces aren’t credited.

It’s essentially a series of fragments which interpolates the Doctor into Shakespeare with mixed results; sometimes it works by revelling in its absurdity (such as the version of A Midsummer Night’s Dream), sometimes by a clever storytelling conceit (the footnotes of Julius Caesar), and even once by inverting the joke (the Shakespeare-ising of An Unearthly Child). The better pieces generally have the virtue of constructing a story around the central gag, the lesser pieces are content to simply point and chuckle at the Doctor being in Shakespeare – the extended Macbeth which quickly palls is a particularly bad offender here. Sadly the latter type of piece tends to prevail so it comes across as a themed grab bag rather than a coherent book. Perhaps it might be an upmarket ‘toilet book’ but some kind of narrative conceit might have helped tie things together. As it is this is a collection of occasional highs mired in some repetitive lows. ( )
  JonArnold | Oct 28, 2015 |
Working on the conceit that "The Shakespeare Code" was not the first or last time the Doctor and Shakespeare met, this book collects alternate versions of scenes from plays as well as the sonnets that imply the intertwined history of Time Lord and Bard. This one will definitely appeal to those who are both Shakespeare and Doctor Who fans and probably not many others. As I'm far less familiar with Classic Who some of the references in the various excerpts went over my head but I still had a lot of fun with this short read. Recommended if it sounds appealing to you. ( )
  MickyFine | Jan 8, 2015 |
http://nwhyte.livejournal.com/2319367.html

This is a bold step by BBC books: a set of sketches which basically all revolve around the same joke, the Doctor (and the Whoniverse) intruding in the fictional world of Shakespeare's plays. The authors include James Goss, who for my money is the best current writer of Who prose, and Matthew Sweet, who brings a certain lit crit depth to proceedings (not to neglect Jonathan Morris and Justin Richards who are both reliable writers of Who fiction). The fifth writer is an undergraduate.

Combining Shakespeare and the Doctor is not new. On TV, quite apart from the 2007 story The Shakespeare Code, references to the Bard go back to his appearance on the Time-Space Visualiser which the First Doctor ripped off from the Space Museum in 1965. Actually the first reference in the Whoniverse is even earlier, in The Dalek Book from June 1964, in which young Daleks are told that "THE SHAKESPEARE PLAYS AND SONNETS WERE WRITTEN BY OUR EMPEROR". I listed the Who/Shakespeare crossovers of which I was then aware back in 2009.

Although this book is basically 200 pages of the same joke, there are some really good twists on it. One would need a certain amount of familiarity with both sets of canonical texts to appreciate all of it - the insertion of Romana into Pericles is actually really funny but only if you know that particular scene from Pericles, which is not exactly Shakespeare's best-known play. But A Midsummer Night's Dream is much better known, and the recasting of the Rude Mechanicals as Sontarans performing a stage interpretation of the events of Horror of Fang Rock is brilliant. And the recasting of the Master as Mephistopheles to Marlowe as Faust, rewriting Shakespeare's plays to remove him and the Doctor from history, is a genius touch - the Master gets some hilarious lines too.

Most of the rest is predictable but entertaining - I could have skipped the sonnets myself, though I see that other readers liked them. Worth the money anyway. ( )
  nwhyte | Aug 23, 2014 |
Showing 3 of 3
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Goss, Jamesprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Morris, Jonathanmain authorall editionsconfirmed
Richards, Julianmain authorall editionsconfirmed
Richards, Justinmain authorall editionsconfirmed
Shakespeare, Williammain authorall editionsconfirmed
Sweet, Matthewmain authorall editionsconfirmed
Collins, MikeIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Doctor Who? That is the question.
Dedication
First words
Considering he is acknowledged as the world's greatest playwright, surprisingly little is actually known about the life and times of William Shakespeare.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0062344420, Hardcover)

Newly discovered entries and drawings in William Shakespeare’s journals reveal for the first time the astounding relationship between the great Bard and the Doctor.

Since his first adventure in 1963, the Doctor has enjoyed many encounters with William Shakespeare. Now, BBC Books has rediscovered notebooks, long thought lost, compiled by the Bard in which he divulges the influential role the Doctor played in his creative life. Here are the original notes for Hamlet, including a very different appearance by the ghost; early versions of great lines (“To reverse or not to reverse the polarity of the neutron flow”); the true story of how the faeries of A Midsummer Night’s Dream were first imagined; stage directions for plays adjusted to remove references to a mysterious blue box; and much, much more.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:15:21 -0400)

"Newly discovered entries and drawings in William Shakespeare's journals reveal for the first time the astounding relationship between the great Bard and the Doctor. Since his first adventure in 1963, the Doctor has enjoyed many encounters with William Shakespeare. Now, BBC Books has rediscovered notebooks, long thought lost, compiled by the Bard in which he divulges the influential role the Doctor played in his creative life. Here are the original notes for Hamlet, including a very different appearance by the ghost; early versions of great lines ("To reverse or not to reverse the polarity of the neutron flow"); the true story of how the faeries of A Midsummer Night's Dream were first imagined; stage directions for plays adjusted to remove references to a mysterious blue box; and much, much more" --… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.4)
0.5
1
1.5 1
2 1
2.5 1
3 1
3.5 2
4 2
4.5
5 2

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 136,349,056 books! | Top bar: Always visible