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The Last Chronicle of Barset by Anthony…
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The Last Chronicle of Barset (1867)

by Anthony Trollope

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The Barsetshire Chronicles (6)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
1,496408,310 (4.29)5 / 314
Anthony Trollope was a masterful satirist with an unerring eye for the most intrinsic details of human behavior and an imaginative grasp of the preoccupations of nineteenth-century English novels. In "The Last Chronicle of Barset," Mr. Crawley, curate of Hogglestock, falls deeply into debt, bringing suffering to himself and his family. To make matters worse, he is accused of theft, can't remember where he got the counterfeit check he is alleged to have stolen, and must stand trial. Trollope's powerful portrait of this complex man-gloomy, brooding, and proud, moving relentlessly from one humiliation to another-achieves tragic dimensions.… (more)

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Showing 1-5 of 40 (next | show all)
Overall, very well done. I enjoyed how Trollope wove together the plot to include all of the main characters in the Chronicles of Barset and for the most part provided a good resolution of all the threads of conflict running through all six books. However, the whole story of the painting of Jael and Sisera could have been omitted without much if any damage to the main story, which was an outstanding analysis of human pride – of its many forms and consequences. Being a lawyer myself, I was also pleased to see Trollope give a mostly positive portrayal of an attorney in this series, Mr. Toogood. I also found Mr. Harding’s situation as the story progressed increasingly poignant, and Mr. Crawley’s descent into madness and its effect on his family frighteningly authentic.

I also found it interesting that Trollope followed international news to the point that he was able to have his characters start arguing about the American Civil War:

“Then Mrs. Grantly, working hard in her vocation as a peacemaker, changed the conversation again, and began to talk of the American war. But even that was made matter of discord on church matters,—the archdeacon professing an opinion that the Southerners were Christian gentlemen, and the Northerners infidel snobs; whereas Mrs. Proudie had an idea that the Gospel was preached with genuine zeal in the Northern States. And at each such outbreak the poor bishop would laugh uneasily, and say a word or two to which no one paid much attention. And so the dinner went on, not always in the most pleasant manner for those who preferred continued social good-humour to the occasional excitement of a half-suppressed battle.”

My reaction to learning that John Eames was related to Grace Crawley was to ask why this wasn’t mentioned earlier in “The Small House at Allington.” One of the reasons why I liked “Small House” the least was because of its tenuous connections to Barsetshire and all the characters I had grown to know and love over the course of the series. It felt almost like “Small House” was just floating around out there when I read it and I found it frustrating (and to a certain extent I still do). I will also say that this confirmed my belief, which began to grow when I was reading “Small House,” that Lily is a fool, and very annoying. And that John Eames deserves better, now that he’s matured. In that sense, I’m glad Trollope didn’t marry them off.

I also wish that Mrs. Proudie’s heart condition had been mentioned earlier in the series, since this explanation for her death didn’t seem to have much to do with anything that had come before. But it might have been necessary to do it that way if the point was that her pride, which developed over the series, ultimately destroyed her heart.
( )
  Jennifer708 | Mar 23, 2020 |
Overall, very well done. I enjoyed how Trollope wove together the plot to include all of the main characters in the Chronicles of Barset and for the most part provided a good resolution of all the threads of conflict running through all six books. However, the whole story of the painting of Jael and Sisera could have been omitted without much if any damage to the main story, which was an outstanding analysis of human pride – of its many forms and consequences. Being a lawyer myself, I was also pleased to see Trollope give a mostly positive portrayal of an attorney in this series, Mr. Toogood. I also found Mr. Harding’s situation as the story progressed increasingly poignant, and Mr. Crawley’s descent into madness and its effect on his family frighteningly authentic.

I also found it interesting that Trollope followed international news to the point that he was able to have his characters start arguing about the American Civil War:

“Then Mrs. Grantly, working hard in her vocation as a peacemaker, changed the conversation again, and began to talk of the American war. But even that was made matter of discord on church matters,—the archdeacon professing an opinion that the Southerners were Christian gentlemen, and the Northerners infidel snobs; whereas Mrs. Proudie had an idea that the Gospel was preached with genuine zeal in the Northern States. And at each such outbreak the poor bishop would laugh uneasily, and say a word or two to which no one paid much attention. And so the dinner went on, not always in the most pleasant manner for those who preferred continued social good-humour to the occasional excitement of a half-suppressed battle.”

My reaction to learning that John Eames was related to Grace Crawley was to ask why this wasn’t mentioned earlier in “The Small House at Allington.” One of the reasons why I liked “Small House” the least was because of its tenuous connections to Barsetshire and all the characters I had grown to know and love over the course of the series. It felt almost like “Small House” was just floating around out there when I read it and I found it frustrating (and to a certain extent I still do). I will also say that this confirmed my belief, which began to grow when I was reading “Small House,” that Lily is a fool, and very annoying. And that John Eames deserves better, now that he’s matured. In that sense, I’m glad Trollope didn’t marry them off.

I also wish that Mrs. Proudie’s heart condition had been mentioned earlier in the series, since this explanation for her death didn’t seem to have much to do with anything that had come before. But it might have been necessary to do it that way if the point was that her pride, which developed over the series, ultimately destroyed her heart.
( )
  Jennifer708 | Mar 23, 2020 |
Not a very taxing story, but not hugely gripping either. It's really all about the characters and their - often odd - ways of thinking, more than any actual plot.
Maybe it would have meant more to me if I'd read the preceding books, but it wasn't as if anything was hard to follow having not done so.

It passed a few days in a relatively easy fashion. ( )
  Sammystarbuck | Sep 2, 2019 |
2019 reread via LibriVox audiobook:
This final book in the Barsetshire series brings together characters from all the previous books. I love the way so many things come together in this book. ( )
  leslie.98 | Jun 18, 2019 |
I thought this would be a great book to have with me on the plane for a couple of trips, but I ended up reading it only in spurts for two weeks and then racing through the last 600 pages in one day. It's a pretty wonderful end to the Chronicles closing with the last days of the Warden, Septimus Harding. The proto-mystery wraps itself up pretty instantaneously after being dragged out for 700-odd pages, but I didn't mind. I am sure there will be some people who believe Lily Dale to be perfectly marvelous, but I found her mostly unbearable, not because she should have taken up with the young man who wooed her, but because she is so pleased with herself and her abnegation. In fact, when they make the Broadway musical of this book it will just be called "Abnegation!".

I have loved the entire series, although I did prefer them when they were under 400 pages. Next up the Palliser novels. ( )
  asxz | Mar 13, 2019 |
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» Add other authors (19 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Trollope, AnthonyAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gilmartin, SophieIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pendle, AlexyIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Skilton, DavidEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Small, HelenIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Trollope, JoannaIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vance, SimonNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
West, TimothyNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wilson, A. N.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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'I can never bring myself to believe it, John,' said Mary Walker, the pretty daughter of Mr George Walker, attorney of Silverbridge.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0140437525, 0141199865

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