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Laughing at My Nightmare by Shane Burcaw
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Laughing at My Nightmare (edition 2014)

by Shane Burcaw (Author)

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2011997,980 (3.7)1
"With acerbic wit ... Shane Burcaw describes the challenges he faces as a twenty-one-year-old with spinal muscular atrophy. From awkward handshakes to having a girlfriend and everything in between, Shane handles his situation with humor and a 'you-only-live-once' perspective on life. While he does talk about everyday issues that are relatable to teens, he also offers an eye-opening perspective on what it is like to have a life-threatening disease"--… (more)
Member:benkroll
Title:Laughing at My Nightmare
Authors:Shane Burcaw (Author)
Info:Roaring Brook Press (2014), 256 pages
Collections:memoirs & essays
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Laughing at My Nightmare by Shane Burcaw

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Showing 1-5 of 19 (next | show all)
Inspirational

An amazing, bar nothing, real life look at what living with a progressive disease can be like. Shane Burcaw is making disability what it should be seen as, another way of life for someone as human as we all are. The start of a series of books that I hope keep coming for a long time. ( )
  giveuspaws | Sep 14, 2020 |
aughing at My Nightmare by Shane Burcaw

A memoir about Shane Burcaw, a young man living with SMA (Spinal Muscular Atrophy). Told with eye opening honesty, humor and laugh out loud moments. Informative insightful dialog had me hooked from page one. Shane Burcaw tells his story in a delightful way, with laughter, hope and encouragement his focus, along with the many challenges and downfalls of this rare disease.

I highly recommend Laughing at My Nightmare to Y/A as well as Adult Readers. I look forward to reading his other two books Not So Different: What You Really Want to Ask About Having a Disability and Strangers Assume My Girlfriend Is My Nurse. ( )
  SheriAWilkinson | Sep 14, 2020 |
Found Shane on YouTube ( Squirmy and Grubs ) where he posts daily videos along with his girlfriend Hannah. I fell in love with both of them as a couple because their love seems so unconditional. They feed off each others humor and sarcasm and yet through these videos, you can see how they respect and learn from each other everyday.

This book for the most part was very interesting. I learned a lot about SMA and the ways people affected adjust their lives to live normally. I was inspired to ignore the smaller things in life that get under my skin because their are bigger and worse things that are happening.

The thing that bothered me about the book was Shane's description, behaviour towards others with mental disabilities. I'm not sure if he was adding humor or he was belittling them. Shane is very intelligent and it appeared that he was above them in a few instances. Almost like he was too good to be associated in their environment. He seperated himself from others while at a camp instead of integrating himself and sharing his passion with others to make them smile.

He has found an angel in Hannah and I wish them nothing but the best. I will continue to watch their trials and tribulation in life. ( )
  SpareTheBS | May 17, 2020 |
The first time I ever heard of Laughing at my Nightmare was in an Unshelved strip about a month ago, which can be found here . It piqued my interest and I checked it out of the library. And man, I'm glad I did. This is one of the funniest, uplifting, and delightfully disgusting memoirs I've read in recent memory.

Shane Burcaw has SMA (spinal muscular atrophy). One night, he wrote a blog with the same title as his book to show how he injects humor into a horrifying situation. His messages about looking at your problems, laughing them off, and being positive are always great to read about, especially when this book is so freaking funny. The passages about riding the bus to school with students who had differing mental disabilities and getting drunk with his cousin had me laughing out loud when I was reading this on my commute to my internship. And...laughing to yourself on the Light Rail pretty much guarantees no one will sit next to you.

This book doesn't shy away from the awkward, frustrating, painful parts of having a disability. And I respect and like this book much more for it. I am also do not mind some of the more disgusting imagery presented in this book. It's not for the squeamish, as there are some pretty graphic, visceral images of broken femurs and how his bodily functions are managed. But, I would highly recommend this book to people looking for a very, very funny memoir with an uplifting message. ( )
  rkcraig88 | Jul 15, 2019 |
It took me a few days to let this one marinate before writing a review. I know that my opinion of it is different than most others here on goodreads, but it left a sour taste in my mouth. Shane (and friends) considers himself to be a champion for disabled people, a breath of fresh air, etc. But throughout the book, he reiterates that he does not like other disabled people. In fact, they sicken him. After a little internet searching, I found that the feeling is mutual. His "fresh air" actually works to steal the legitimate voices of those fighting for their rights. By pushing so hard to make "normal" the "cool" way for disabled people to act, he makes others look like whiners to the outside world, when they have real, important concerns. And, when they can't come off as "cool" as he does, he makes them seem sickening to others as well.

It's incredibly sad. If he could have paired his insightful, funny, candid style with real compassion, this book would have been a home run. As it stands, he is Regina George for people with disabilities. And that is decidedly uncool. ( )
  kweber319 | May 13, 2019 |
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"With acerbic wit ... Shane Burcaw describes the challenges he faces as a twenty-one-year-old with spinal muscular atrophy. From awkward handshakes to having a girlfriend and everything in between, Shane handles his situation with humor and a 'you-only-live-once' perspective on life. While he does talk about everyday issues that are relatable to teens, he also offers an eye-opening perspective on what it is like to have a life-threatening disease"--

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