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Vision in Silver (2015)

by Anne Bishop

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The Others (3)

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6398425,959 (4.25)56
"The New York Times bestselling author of The Black Jewels Trilogy transports readers to a world of magic and political unrest-where the only chance at peace requires a deadly price... The Others freed the cassandra sangue to protect the blood prophets from exploitation, not realizing their actions would have dire consequences. Now the fragile seers are in greater danger than ever before-both from their own weaknesses and from those who seek to control their divinations for wicked purposes. In desperate need of answers, Simon Wolfgard, a shape-shifter leader among the Others, has no choice but to enlist blood prophet Meg Corbyn's help, regardless of the risks she faces by aiding him. Meg is still deep in the throes of her addiction to the euphoria she feels when she cuts and speaks prophecy. She knows each slice of her blade tempts death. But Others and humans alike need answers, and her visions may be Simon's only hope of ending the conflict. For the shadows of war are deepening across the Atlantik, and the prejudice of a fanatic faction is threatening to bring the battle right to Meg and Simon's doorstep..."--… (more)

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» See also 56 mentions

English (83)  Dutch (1)  All languages (84)
Showing 1-5 of 83 (next | show all)
I am struggling with this series. I clearly like it enough that after wading through book 2, I went back for book 3. My struggles remain though.

If you're unfamiliar with Ms. Bishop's Black Gem other series, I struggled with them in the same way. The Black Gem series switches out an abusive patriarchy for an abusive matriarchy, and yet keeps you rooting for the matriarchy. The difference is, in the Black Gem series, the rapes and abuse the men suffer under a totalitarian/evil matriarchy are called out as such and the female lead character works to destroy this problematic aspect of her matriarchal society. The questionable behavior by the "good guys" in the Others series makes it hard for me to side with them. I think you could easily write the series from the opposite point of view and make them much more worthy of your sympathy.

The "good guys" in these books give the humans as little land as possible, while heavily taxing them, using all of the wonderful things the humans create and threatening to eat the humans if they stand up for themselves. These "good guys" are working, vaguely, toward getting along with the humans, but only the humans they like, who they basically seem to view as stupid pets and yet all but one are basically on thin ice and taking their lives in their hands to work with these "good guys".

So yes, the humans hate the "good guys", but I want you to imagine that a powerful group of individuals treat you (basically refugees from even more of their kind) like monsters, while essentially appropriating your culture and threatening to eat you any time you don't let them do basically whatever they want. As I write this I will admit the word that came up over and over again for me was "racism" and it reminded me of the South (U.S.A.) after slavery was overturned. Sure, we won't keep slaves any more, but we'll benefit from them and systematically destroy any safety, family life or culture they try to build for themselves while segregating them from ourselves while retaining all the good things all for ourselves.

2 stars because in between threats to eat everyone I like the book and I think she deserves kudos for somehow beating it into me that these people are okay and I should cheer with them, because for most of the book I managed to stay hooked. Yes, the treatment of Meg and her people are horrible, but lumping everyone in with a few 1%'s and basically systematically abusing the humans until they are turning in on themselves and willing to face the wrath of creatures that are essentially gods? Becoming real hard for me to put up with. If Bishop would have any one of the human characters, or even Other characters point out that if you treat people like animals they will bite you and eat their young in the process I would read on. Instead all the "good guy" humans basically whine and wring their hands over "if we don't do whatever our abusive masters say they'll reserve the right to bite us and that's their right so we should shut up and just try to be peaceful while they levy taxes and literally eat us if they get annoyed or are just looking for amusement." It's like reading a book about Southern slavery written from the point of view of that one well treated slave who thinks we should let the beatings go on, because not all of us are nice, and really we don't deserve freedom.

I realize comparing fiction to an actual atrocious event is pretty terrible, but this is what I thought of this entire book: basically an excused way to enslave humans because they're bad/not as good as us. I won't be reading any further in this series. It leaves me with an increasingly sour taste in my mouth. ( )
  lclclauren | Sep 12, 2020 |
had mixed feelings about “Vision In Silver”, the third “Novel of The Others”.

I enjoyed “Written In Red” because it was new and fresh, it focused closely on “Our Meg” and her discovery of a world beyond the compound that she’d been kept in, her personal growth and the drama of the plot. It remains one of my favourite fantasy books.

“Murder of Crows” -which could have been subtitled “the humans strike back”- was less intense but provided a much deeper and broader view of this world and put Meg’s background in context. It was an extension of “Written In Red” and helped me see the humans as much more monstrous than the Werewolves and Vampires who provide the public face of The Others.

“Vision In Silver” continues to give a wider view of the world: its inhabitants, its politics, and the strange and strained truce between humans and The Others, but I felt that, in becoming broader, it had lost some of its intensity. I wanted more focus on Meg. I wanted the characters and their relationships to deepen in the same way that the world view does. Although I found out a lot about the characters, more and more of them seemed like plot devices rather than people.

Compared to many Fantasy books I’ve read, “Vision In Silver” is a high quality novel that is satisfying to read, it just didn’t deliver as much as I’d hoped.

There are some very strong scenes in the book: an attack at a market place, the decision of rescued Cassandra Sangue to live when those around her see death as their only way out of an unbearable situation, humans and The Others gardening together, at peace but still very alien to one another. I particularly enjoyed the story of the Cassandra Sangue who finds an alternative to the cutting that shortens their lives: it was told with compassion and empathy without being simply mushy. The story of the little girl and her mother, which forms the central plotline, was also well delivered.

Yet… I felt a little distant from this book. The balance of ideas to emotions tipped a little the wrong way. I felt it was like a sponge that hadn’t quite risen – still tasty and edible but disappointing. ( )
  MikeFinnFiction | May 16, 2020 |
Do you know what happened to the dinosaurs? The Others is what happened to the dinosaurs.

Vision in Silver is the third in The Others series by Anne Bishop. Actions having consequences is a huge theme of the series and is really coming to light in this installment. This is also the book where the fact that events in a small area are having a lot more impact on the world at large than our characters first imagined.

Freed from their "benevolent ownership" the cassandra sangue are finding it difficult to adjust to the outside world. This is proving dangerous both for themselves and those looking to help them. Can Meg, first of her kind to ever escape, help? Meanwhile, tension are rising as attacks on humans and Others continue, with the Humans First and Last movement placing all the blame on the Others. Unfortunately their actions have not gone unnoticed.

I could not put this book down. Bishop has an amazing talent of balancing the horror with the tender moments. One of the atrocities committed made me incredibly sad and the reaction Meg had to it made me teary eyed. At that moment I could've used my own wolf pup to cuddle. It's also interesting how the story continues to ask who the real monsters are, with humans basically being the greatest threat to their continued existence as a species.

Meg, the Others of the Lakeside Courtyard and her new human friends continue to be a joy. It's fun that the Courtyard has accepted a "human pack" to go along with Meg. I also feel it's going to be very important to the human's survival in the future. The new cassandra sangue who likes to draw her visions into pictures offers hope that perhaps they might have another outlet for prophecy that won't result in their early deaths. I also enjoy Meg and Simon's growing fondness for each other and how they work out how to have a relationship.

That ending gave me chills. The humans are in a lot of trouble. Quite honestly, they deserve it. I can't wait to see where the story goes next. I both look forward to and somewhat dread meeting the Elders. ( )
  Narilka | May 12, 2020 |
ohmygodohmygodohmygod this was good this was soooooo good! the book is absolutely riveting and my name is Hope and Simon and Meg holding hands were a perfect closure to a very tense book. You care for the characters, you are interested in the world -- it's rare that a series of books gets better but this did. Oh yes, it did. ( )
  chx | Mar 21, 2020 |
With this being the third book in the series there is more buildup to the war that is brewing between some of the Humans First and Last and the Others. Some of the book deals with the other blood prophets that were rescued at the end of the previous book. Meg is trying to make a book to help them cope with being out of the prisons they were raised in. There is more development with the humans that are associated with the courtyard in this book. This is a ramp up to what is happening in the greater world with more humans not wanting to live in the constraints of the Others. A good book and great world building. ( )
  Glennis.LeBlanc | Jan 6, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 83 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Anne Bishopprimary authorall editionscalculated
Auerbach, AdamCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Harris, AlexandraNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Morrow, BlakeCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sigal, ElkeDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
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For Jennifer Crow
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Meg Corbyn entered the bathroom in the Human Liasion's Office and laid out the items she'd labeled the tools of prophecy: antiseptic ointment, bandages, and the silver folding razor decorated with pretty leaves and flowers on one side of the handle.
Quotations
[Simon Wolfgard explaining to Captain Burke & Pete Denby what will happen if there's not enough food]
'We will fight for what is ours. In the end, your young will have enough to eat because there will be fewer humans wanting a share. And our young will grow strong on all the meat harvested from the fight.' (chapter 6)
Ruthie was the one who had realized the terra indigne had a verbal hierarchy they used when talking about humans, a way of indicating the degree of interaction with an individual. Ruth had been the Ruthie when she'd been a customer at Howling Good Reads, but since she'd started working in the Courtyard, she was just Ruthie. Meg was Meg, the Meg, or our Meg depending on who was talking to her or about her.

And humans the Others didn't like had 'that' added to their names. (chapter 15)
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"The New York Times bestselling author of The Black Jewels Trilogy transports readers to a world of magic and political unrest-where the only chance at peace requires a deadly price... The Others freed the cassandra sangue to protect the blood prophets from exploitation, not realizing their actions would have dire consequences. Now the fragile seers are in greater danger than ever before-both from their own weaknesses and from those who seek to control their divinations for wicked purposes. In desperate need of answers, Simon Wolfgard, a shape-shifter leader among the Others, has no choice but to enlist blood prophet Meg Corbyn's help, regardless of the risks she faces by aiding him. Meg is still deep in the throes of her addiction to the euphoria she feels when she cuts and speaks prophecy. She knows each slice of her blade tempts death. But Others and humans alike need answers, and her visions may be Simon's only hope of ending the conflict. For the shadows of war are deepening across the Atlantik, and the prejudice of a fanatic faction is threatening to bring the battle right to Meg and Simon's doorstep..."--

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