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Table of Contents by John McPhee

Table of Contents

by John McPhee

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From bear cubs are tagged and traced--tourists in Alaska--Senator Bradley--making use of artificial ice--to a bush pilot named John McPhee (north of the C.P. Line)
  AnneliM | Jun 25, 2008 |
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Book description
Contents (articles previously published in The New Yorker, between 1980 & 1985):

Under the snow --
A textbook place for bears --
Riding the boom extension --
Heirs of general practice --
Open man --
Ice pond --
Minihydro --
North of the C.P. line.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0374520089, Paperback)

Table of Contents is a collection of eight pieces that range from Alaska to New Jersey, describing, for example, the arrival of telephones in a small village near the Arctic Circle and the arrival of wild bears in considerable numbers in New Jersey, swarming in from the Poconos in search of a better life ("Riding the Boom Extension," "A Textbook Place for Bears").

In "North of the C.P. Line" the author introduces his friend John McPhee, a bush-pilot fish-and-game warden in northern Maine, who is also a writer. The two men met after the flying warden wrote to The New Yorker complaining that someone was using his name. Maine also is the milieu of "Heirs of General Practice," McPhee's highly acclaimed report—virtually a book in itself—on the new medical specialty called family practice. Much of it takes place in the examining rooms of a dozen young physicans in various rural communities, where they are seen in the context of their work with a great many patients of all ages.

Two relatively short pieces revisit the subjects of earlier McPhee books. "Ice Pond" demonstrates anew the innovative genius of the physicist Theodore B. Taylor, who developed a way of making and using with impressive results in the conservation of the electrical energy. "Open Man" describes a summer day in New Jersey in the company of Senator Bill Bradley.

In "Minihydro," various small-scale entrepreneurs in New York State set up turbines at nineteenth-century mill sites and sell electricity to power companies. A nice little country waterfall can earn as much as two hundred dollars a year for someone with such a turbine. And, "Under the Snow," McPhee Goes back into black bear's dens in Pensylvania in winter, where he becomes intoxicated with affection for some five-pound cubs. They remind him of his daughters.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:14:47 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Eight essays discuss wild bears, a Maine game warden, family practice physicians, energy conservation, and political campaigning

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