HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Watching Them Be: Star Presence on the…
Loading...

Watching Them Be: Star Presence on the Screen from Garbo to Balthazar

by James Harvey

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
7None1,138,814 (5)None

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
As before, as always—
for Betty Ann
First words
PREFACE

“ONE DOES NOT go to see them act,” wrote James Baldwin about the great iconic movie stars Wayne and Davis and Bogart, “one goes to watch them be” (italics his).
SO WHAT WAS it about Garbo?
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0571211976, Hardcover)

An intimate, thought-provoking exploration of the mysteries of “star presence” in cinema

“One does not go to see them act,” James Baldwin wrote about the great iconic movie stars, “one goes to watch them be.” It seems obvious . . . Where else besides the movies do you get to see other persons so intimately, so pressingly, so largely? Where else are you allowed such sustained and searching looks as you give to these strangers on the screen, whoever they really are? In life you try not to stare; but at the movies that’s exactly what you get to do, two hours or more—safely, raptly, even blissfully.

It’s this sort of amplified, heightened, sometimes transcendent “seeing” that James Harvey explores in Watching Them Be. Marvelously vivid and perceptive, and impressively erudite, this is his take on how aura is communicated in movies. Beginning where Roland Barthes left off with the face of Greta Garbo and ending with Robert Bresson’s Au hasard Balthazar (and its inscrutable nonhuman star), Harvey moves nimbly and expertly through film history, celebrating actors and directors who have particularly conveyed a feeling of transcendence.
     From Marlene Dietrich to John Wayne to Robert De Niro, from Nashville to Jackie Brown to Masculine/Feminine and the implicitly or explicitly religious films of Roberto Rossellini and Carl Theodor Dreyer, this is one man’s personal, deeply felt account of the films that have changed his life. They will also, Harvey suggests, change yours.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:11:00 -0400)

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (5)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4
4.5
5 1

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 126,401,353 books! | Top bar: Always visible