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Trading with the Enemy: The Covert Economy…
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Trading with the Enemy: The Covert Economy During the American Civil War…

by Philip Leigh

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It starts out well; but the author's polemicizing about the underground economy between the North and South during the war, along with several side jaunts and and 'Well, but...' dismissals as to reasons given for the North to continue to allow such trade, weakens the thrust of the arguments. This will do until a more balanced account is written. ( )
  BruceCoulson | Aug 26, 2014 |
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In Trading with the Enemy: The Covert Economy During the American Civil War, New York Times Disunion contributor Philip Leigh recounts the little-known story of clandestine commerce between the North and South. Cotton was so important to the Northern economy that Yankees began growing it on the captured Sea Islands of South Carolina. Soon the neutral port of Matamoras, Mexico, became a major trading center, where nearly all the munitions shipped to the port - much of it from Northern armories - went to the Confederacy. After the fall of New Orleans and Vicksburg, a frenzy of contraband-for-cotton swept across the vast trans-Mississippi Confederacy, with Northerners sometimes buying the cotton directly from the Confederate government. A fascinating study, Trading with the Enemy adds another layer to our understanding of the Civil War.… (more)

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