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Next: Pastoral Succession That Works

by William Vanderbloemen, Warren Bird

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I am at the beginning of a pastoral succession process. The church I start leading on Sunday, has had a pastor for the past twelve-and-a-half years who is loved by the church and the wider community. This is a woman who has networked, started ministries which reach out to the community and has prayerfully led the church through difficult circumstances. She has a heart for racial justice, community outreach and mission. She leaves this position to focus more in these areas and she will still be part of the church family.

I am the 'noob.' I care about many of the same things as the previous pastor and want to see the church impact the wider community but am still at the beginning of learning how to lead a church. I want to do that well. So I read Next: Pastoral Succession That Works with interest hoping to garner whatever kind of wisdom it had for me at this moment in my pastoral career. Authors William Vanderbloemen and Warren Bird have years of experience in helping church leaders lead effectively. In this book, they research successions that work, successions that fail and how church boards and pastoral leaders can plan for a good succession process.

This book wasn't written directly to me, but for out-going pastors, search committees and elder boards to help them think ahead. Vanderbloemen and Bird noticed that many successful pastors stay in their role past their prime, with no real plan of succession. As a result, the church looses momentum and when the inevitable switch happens it falls off mission and loses membership. They suggest intentionality about the succession process. After all, every pastoral position (or really any position) is temporary. All pastors are interim pastors who steward the church for a term, and they should be thoughtful about how to prepare the way for their successor.

Because Vanderbloemen and Bird base their findings on qualitative research, this book is full of stories of the succession process at various different kinds of churches (both glorious successes and epic failures). They observe that some of the best succession stories happen when churches groom someone from their staff or membership to take the place of the out-going pastor. This makes sense to me, though I think large mega-churches are more likely to have the pool to draw on for this sort of succession (and I am kind of glad the church I was hired at didn't follow that route). Also, they speak highly of father-son successions without any worry about nepotism (i.e. Joel Osteen is one of their 'success' stories).

However, they do not have a formula 'one-right-way' approach. They assert that if God is in it, successions will work. Three pieces of salient advice I found helpful were: (1) intentionality about the succession process-especially in the first 100 days, (2) help from the out-going senior pastor, (3) new pastor honoring their successor and the church's past.

I think churches will benefit from reading this book, especially when they are in the midst of a search process. Vanderbloemen and Bird talk about the intentional, good sort of succession, but they also address succession problems when a leader unexpectedly dies, has a moral failure or resigns early. A board with proper foresight can plan for every contingency. Vanderbloemen and Bird suggest creating a succession plan and revisiting annually.

At times I disagreed with their pragmatic bent. They seemed to measure the success of a succession in terms of congregational attendance. Organizations go through ebbs and flows and I think a church that shrinks from thousands to hundred when the new pastor comes but is more faithful to the gospel, has had a successful succession even if their metrics do not bear this out. God can be in apparent failures too. This doesn't mean that new pastors should not strive to bring in new sheep and to bear fruit in their ministry. It means that the picture of what it means to be a good, and faithful pastoral servant is more complicated than the picture that Vanderbloemen and Bird suggest.

But practical advice is important and I think that this book will be read with benefit. My own case is not the typical succession and I am blessed to have the input of the previous pastor, a good and faithful servant, mentor and friend. I give it four stars: ★★★★

Thank you to Baker Books for providing me a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. ( )
  Jamichuk | May 22, 2017 |
The advice and wisdom shared within the pages of NEXT: Pastoral Succession That Works is nothing but brilliant! Every pastor should consider reading this together with their elder and/or staff leadership because pastoral succession is one of the most overlooked yet one of the most important conversations and decisions a church will ever face.

I agree wholeheartedly with the authors that “every pastor is an interim” and there is “no success without a successor.” I believe that a truly devoted and loving pastor would never want to leave a ministry behind without a plan, a future, and a successor. Preparing for and finding a successor is a “process and not an event” and the best time to start planning is NOW and not when a crisis arises. I believe that some of the greatest wisdom in the book includes:

- Making it a regular practice to develop leaders and share in leading,
- Preparing a succession “emergency envelope,”
- The fact that too many pastors stay too long, and
- “Sometimes even the unlikeliest candidates can become pastoral
successors with amazing results.”

Several case studies and great insights are shared while the book also encourages each pastor and church to find what works best for them because there no “one way” when it comes to succession.

This book can save the church leadership a lot of headaches, provide the pastor with a healthy legacy and rewarding future, enable the church to continue transforming discipleship, and secure a bright outlook for the entire ministry. A must read for all pastors, elders, and churches wanting to make sure their hard work. A special thank you to Baker Books for providing a copy of this book for review through Goodreads! ( )
  Steve_Hinkle | Nov 4, 2014 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Vanderbloemen, Williamprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bird, Warrenmain authorall editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0801016479, Hardcover)

Every church and ministry goes through changes in leadership, and the issue is far bigger than the wave of pastors from the Baby Boomer generation who are moving toward retirement. When a pastor leaves a church, ministries are disrupted and members drift away. If the church is already struggling, it can find itself suddenly in very dire straits indeed. But the outcome doesn't have to be that way.

What if when a pastor moved on, the church knew exactly what to do to find a suitable replacement because a plan and a process had been in place for some time? While there is no simple, one-size-fits-all solution to the puzzle of planning for a seamless pastoral succession, Next offers church leaders and pastors a guide to asking the right questions in order to plan for the future. Vanderbloemen, founder of a leading pastoral search firm, and Bird, an award-winning writer and researcher, share insider stories of succession successes and failures in dozens of churches, including some of the nation's most influential. Through case studies, interviews, and real-time research, the authors demystify successful pastoral succession and help readers prepare for an even brighter future for their ministries.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:04 -0400)

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