HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Girl from Human Street: Ghosts of Memory…
Loading...

The Girl from Human Street: Ghosts of Memory in a Jewish Family

by Roger Cohen

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
402285,656 (3.88)1

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 1 mention

Showing 2 of 2
Written by the NYT columnist, this rambling book traces the author's family from their native Lithuania in the late 19th century to South Africa, Israel, and England. The author interweaves his own childhood memories with historical research into his ancestors.

The book is beautifully written, though I sometimes found it a bit flowery, and prefer plainer prose. It's hard to characterize what the book is about- partly it focuses on Jewish wanderings and persecution, making the point that Jews can never really assimilate, no matter how hard they try (and Cohen himself is an atheist). But then much of the book is about his mother's Bipolar Disorder and the mental illness that courses through his family; he spends a big chunk of the latter part of the book on his Israeli cousin who also suffered from the disease.

The most moving part is Cohen's description of the impact on him and his sister, growing up with a distant father and a mother with unpredictable mood swings and little capacity to care for them.

A good read, anyway, but I think it could have been shorter and focused more on one thing or the other. ( )
  DanTarlin | Nov 30, 2016 |
Acquired 2015
  jgsgblib | May 8, 2016 |
Showing 2 of 2
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Information from the Russian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0307594661, Hardcover)

An expansive yet intimate memoir of modern Jewish identity, following the diaspora of the author's own family to assay the impact of memory, displacement, and disquiet.

The award-winning New York Times columnist and former foreign correspondent turns a compassionate yet discerning eye on the legacy of his own family-most notably his mother's-in order to understand more profoundly the nature of modern Jewish experience. Through his emotionally lucid prose, we relive the anomie of European Jews after the Holocaust, following them from Lithuania to South Africa, England, the United States, and Israel. He illuminates the uneasy resonance of the racism his family witnessed living in apartheid-era South Africa and the ambivalence felt by his Israeli cousin when tasked with policing the occupied West Bank. He explores the pervasive Jewish sense of "otherness" and finds it has been a significant factor in his family's history of manic depression. This tale of remembrance and repression, suicide and resilience, moral ambivalence and uneasily evolving loyalties (religious, ethnic, national) both tells an unflinching personal story and contributes an important chapter to the ongoing narrative of Jewish life.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:18:47 -0400)

Award-winning New York Times columnist Roger Cohen turns a compassionate yet discerning eye on the legacy of his own forebears. As he follows them across continents and decades, mapping individual lives that diverge and intertwine, vital patterns of struggle and resilience, valued heritage and evolving loyalties (religious, ethnic, national), converge into a resonant portrait of cultural identity in the modern age. Beginning in the nineteenth century and continuing through to the present day, Cohen tracks his family's story of repeated upheaval, from Lithuania to South Africa, and then to England, the United States, and Israel. It is a tale of otherness marked by overt and latent anti-Semitism, but also otherness as a sense of inheritance. We see Cohen's family members grow roots in each adopted homeland even as they struggle to overcome the loss of what is left behind and to adapt. At the heart of The Girl from Human Street is the powerful and touching relationship between Cohen and his mother, that "girl." Tortured by the upheavals in her life yet stoic in her struggle, she embodies her son's complex inheritance.--From publisher description.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
11 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.88)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 3
3.5
4 3
4.5
5 2

HighBridge Audio

An edition of this book was published by HighBridge Audio.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 119,412,212 books! | Top bar: Always visible