HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Guantánamo Diary by Mohamedou Ould Slahi
Loading...

Guantánamo Diary (2015)

by Mohamedou Ould Slahi, Larry Siems (Editor)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1701269,943 (4.46)9

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 9 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
I spent a lot of time processing this book, as it was very dark but yet not nearly as dark as I'd feared. After having followed some of the coverage of the big federal torture report, I was pretty familiar with what a lot of the possibilities were. The fact that I didn't find this book more shocking was disturbing to me.

Of course, Slahi was also deliberately trying to not be salacious, to report just what happened to him, as accurately as he could. And his ability to find, and sometimes successfully connect to the humanity in his torturers also undercut the depravity of what was being done to him.

My overall impression after finishing this book, and reading several reviews and essays about the book, was to be impressed less by the cruelty of the CIA torture program, but more by its ineptitude. That they captured, held, and tortured a man all based on such tenuous evidence. That when they finally committed to full-blown torture, it resulted in nothing more helpful than a man prepared to confess to absolutely anything that they asked him to write down, which is almost exactly what he told them, and they seemed happy with that result. But the most ridiculous was the redaction of Slahi's manuscript, which was often laughable. Such as the oft-remarked case that all pronouns related to a guard/torturer were redacted only when that person was female. Or the number of times that what was redacted was easily reconstructed by its context, and the number of times those redactions were publicly-known facts.

If you want to bear witness to the cruelty of the CIA's torture program, read the torture report. If you want to be struck by how misguided it is, or be impressed by someone who could retain their full humanity in the face of it, read this book. ( )
  greeniezona | Dec 6, 2017 |
Guantánamo Diary by Mohamedou Ould Slahi and Larry Siems (Editor) is a very thought-provoking and disturbing book. This man was arrested and released in 2002. Arrested again and then held, although the government where he was arrested could not understand why he was arrested but they were doing it for the Americans. He was shipped to a couple of places until he arrived at Guantanamo. Never charged with anything, held from 2002 then was finally told he was to be released in 2009 by Judge Robertson but Obama's administration appealed it so he went back to the pit of forgotten souls. He kept a diary during his stay there and it is held by the government as "top secret" because they don't want their abusive ways known but of course we all know. With the freedom of information act, some redacted pages were released and published here. He describes what he went through, and he is still locked up. There was no convincing evidence at the arrest or at the trial or wrong doing but still he sits in a prison of horrors. Who is really the terrorist? ( )
  MontzaleeW | Apr 22, 2017 |
Four stars for being well-written, engaging and absolutely horrifying, and an extra star for being written during imprisonment at Guantánamo. Mohamedou Ould Slahi builds a powerful narrative, all the more compelling because his story of extraordinary rendition, torture and deprivation is nonfiction. Despite the horrors he endures — the author is still, after 15 years since his initial arrest, locked up at Guantánamo, never formally charged with any crime — Slahi doesn't lose his mind, faith or empathy: an impressive feat. I hope many people read his story and realize the unparalleled sadism enacted by the U.S. government around the world. And that, after all the false promises, the administration finally shuts down the prison at Guantánamo, the prison in Bagram, Afghanistan, and the practice of torture. I won't keep my fingers crossed for that, but I do hope Slahi is done justice.
  csoki637 | Nov 27, 2016 |
If an honest and factual account this is a devastating indictment of US Governments (particularly the appalling post 9/11 blood-lust, vengeance-seeking Bush administration), US Justice, US Military and the USA as a whole!
An astonishing account of what can only be described as 'brute force, ignorance and injustice' on the part of the USA!
On the other side: The reader cannot be certain of various parts of the grievously ill-treated author's claims - that said, the man's innocence or guilt as a would-be terrorist/sympathiser is not grounds for any of the egregious torture whilst illegally incarcerated having never faced charges never mind a Legally constituted Court of Law - therefore the author must be given the benefit of the doubt.
Thus, Guantanamo Diary SHAMES the USA and Americans in general in a manner that reduces all its Constitution's high-flown allegiance to Democracy and the Rule of Law to nothing better than that once so vilely claimed and traduced by its former enemy, the USSR! ( )
  tommi180744 | May 23, 2016 |
I am amazed that somebody can build such an incriminating opinion about people he or she doesn't even know." - Mohamedou Ould Slahi

If you read any piece of ‪‎nonfiction‬ this year, read this memoir written by a current Guantanamo detainee. Slahi recounts how he became a prisoner on the island prison after Congress gave the military and FBI carte blanche to pursue terrorists after 9/11. Slahi (an ex-Al-Qaeda fighter during the Soviet war in Afghanistan) was illegally kidnapped in his home country of Mauritania before being turned over to the US. A German-trained engineer, Slahi never set foot in the US before landing in GITMO in 2002 only to be systematically tortured and held without charges or a trial. The author claims to bear no ill will against the US and has no ties to terrorism aside from being part of Al Qaeda when the US-backed fighters against the Soviets. Slahi's descriptions of torture are disturbing and only made more damning by the sections blacked out by government censors. This memoir is an important read to understand the war crimes being perpetrated against people the US says are terrorists despite having no trial or access to the evidence against them. Slahi was ordered to be released from GITMO in 2010 by a federal judge, but he remains locked up and serves as a reminder of the growing black mark on the US' foreign policy, justice system and ethical dealings with international citizens. ( )
1 vote acgallegos91 | Mar 21, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Mohamedou Ould Slahiprimary authorall editionscalculated
Siems, LarryEditormain authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0316328685, Hardcover)

An unprecedented international publishing event: the first and only diary written by a still-imprisoned Guantánamo detainee.

Since 2002, Mohamedou Slahi has been imprisoned at the detainee camp at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. In all these years, the United States has never charged him with a crime. Although he was ordered released by a federal judge, the U.S. government fought that decision, and there is no sign that the United States plans to let him go.

Three years into his captivity Slahi began a diary, recounting his life before he disappeared into U.S. custody and daily life as a detainee. His diary is not merely a vivid record of a miscarriage of justice, but a deeply personal memoir---terrifying, darkly humorous, and surprisingly gracious. Published now for the first time, GUANTÁNAMO DIARY is a document of immense historical importance.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:24:15 -0400)

An unprecedented international publishing event: the first and only diary written by a still-imprisoned Guantánamo detainee. Since 2002, Mohamedou Slahi has been imprisoned at the detainee camp at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. In all these years, the United States has never charged him with a crime. Although he was ordered released by a federal judge, the U.S. government fought that decision, and there is no sign that the United States plans to let him go. Three years into his captivity Slahi began a diary, recounting his life before he disappeared into U.S. custody and daily life as a detainee. His diary is not merely a vivid record of a miscarriage of justice, but a deeply personal memoir--terrifying, darkly humorous, and surprisingly gracious. Published now for the first time, Guantánamo Diary is a document of immense historical importance."--Provided by publisher.… (more)

» see all 4 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.46)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 1
3.5 2
4 2
4.5 5
5 12

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 126,378,734 books! | Top bar: Always visible