HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Prey by Tom Isbell
Loading...

The Prey

by Tom Isbell

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
718237,416 (3.35)10

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 10 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
This book was really more of a two and a half stars.

I don't know why, but stories like this, ones of people trapped in awful places in post-apocalyptic settings really appeal to me. This particular one was way less gripping than many others I have read, though not terrible by any means.

There were a few things about the story/writing that bothered me great deal, a big one being the god damned insta-love crap between Book and Hope. They said like two words to each other and all of a sudden they couldn't stop thinking of the other and were pining after each other.

A couple of scenes involving the above mentioned characters seemed incredibly out of place, especially the one where Book and Hope were trapped in the cave in and decided to lay down and take a nap pressed against each other rather than dig their way out.

The ending was a load of crap too. They got all the way to apparent freedom and then were just like "well, gotta go back now to get the others!" Idk why they couldn't have just rested for even a short while and potentially gathered up townspeople to help them.

I will not be continuing this series. ( )
  Moore31 | Feb 25, 2018 |
This book was really more of a two and a half stars.

I don't know why, but stories like this, ones of people trapped in awful places in post-apocalyptic settings really appeal to me. This particular one was way less gripping than many others I have read, though not terrible by any means.

There were a few things about the story/writing that bothered me great deal, a big one being the god damned insta-love crap between Book and Hope. They said like two words to each other and all of a sudden they couldn't stop thinking of the other and were pining after each other.

A couple of scenes involving the above mentioned characters seemed incredibly out of place, especially the one where Book and Hope were trapped in the cave in and decided to lay down and take a nap pressed against each other rather than dig their way out.

The ending was a load of crap too. They got all the way to apparent freedom and then were just like "well, gotta go back now to get the others!" Idk why they couldn't have just rested for even a short while and potentially gathered up townspeople to help them.

I will not be continuing this series. ( )
  Moore31 | Feb 25, 2018 |
Find the full review and more @ A Weebish Book Blog

THE PREY by Tom Isbell is the first book in the Prey series, and a book that has received a lot of hate since it’s debut in 2015. It is a story about a group of teenagers that decide to fight for a life of freedom against impossible odds in dystopian America. Ultimately, I enjoyed this novel, but there were definite issues with the book that makes it understandable why so many readers did not enjoy the book. I struggled to keep reading it, myself.

The first issue I ran across was the grammar. There was an abundance of sentence fragments and unnecessary imagery that didn’t add much to the story line except redundancy. A few examples:

- “Blood. Purpling. Coagulating before his eyes.”
- “other vehicles had arrived, disgorging brown-shirted soldiers”
- “[they] slid him into the Humvee like a pan of dough going into an oven.”

I’m all for figurative language to help develop the plot, the world building, and character development…. but some things just don’t need describing.

While I was able to overlook the grammar, I was almost unable to finish the book due to the excruciatingly slow moving plot. It took 19 chapters to finally hook me. NINETEEN. I must have put the book down a dozen times because anything else was more entertaining then reading THE PREY. The writing style had me convinced it was going to be a fast-paced read, but don’t be fooled – it’s not. However, I am thankful I was able to motivate myself to finish the book, because once things started moving, I could not put it down.

“If you want to change something, change it. Yesterday was yesterday, today is today.”

Before we start chatting characters, let me explain a little bit about the world this book is set in. The Republic of the True America is the new government that was formed after The United States was bombed with electromagnetic radiation that fried everything electronic and ruined the country. After the new Republic took over, they separated survivors into settlement camps and — like your typical dystopian government — blamed all their issues on Less Thans and brainwashed the public into fearing the next Omega (the day the world as they knew it ended) would be their fault, too.

Who is a Less Than, you ask? Homosexuals, people of color, those disfigured by radiation, political dissidents, people of non-approved religious affiliations, the mentally disabled — anyone different. Kinda familiar, isn’t it?

THE PREY follows two sets of characters — Book and his fellow LT brethren at Camp Liberty, a settlement that raises Less Thans to be hunted for sport when they become of age, and twin sisters Hope & Faith as they are on the run from the Republic and trying to survive. The chapters told from Book’s point of view is a first person narrative, while the girls’ is third person. It didn’t get in the way of my enjoyment, but it was a little bit strange at first.

It took me a good dozen chapters to figure out the main cast members of the novel, and even more so for me to sort through my feelings for them. Book and Hope are without a doubt the main characters, and so is Cat, who played a crucial part in their survival.

Book is by far my favorite main character. He is bookish, courageous, and cares about the survival of others. I have fairly mixed feelings about Hope. She’s your stereotypical badass heroine that you see in a lot of YA science fiction these days. Her attitude towards her sister and other characters that weren’t quite as extraordinary might have been realistic, but it rubbed me the wrong way. Cat I wound up liking more than I thought I would. He was an asshole at first, but as the book progresses and we learned more about him, I grew more fond of him.

There is a long list of secondary characters, but only a few of them actually add to the development of the story. Dozer is one such secondary character that I could not stand. He was whiny, argumentative, and created conflict among the others. I hope he doesn’t appear much in book two.

I definitely struggled finishing this novel. It took a long while for me to feel invested in the characters — and to want to keep reading. I can’t say THE PREY is my new favorite, but I will be reading book two – and hoping the writing progresses as the series does. ( )
  aweebishbookblog | Jun 20, 2017 |
The Prey by Tom Isbell is a post-apocalyptic story about a group of boys and girls who are being raised in settlement camps. It’s twenty years after the war that changed American forever. The boys find out that when they turn sixteen they will be used as prey for the amusement of hunters while the girls, all sets of twins, are being forced to take part in medical experiments. By the time they escape, the girls have all lost their twin. These kids with only a slim chance of survival search for a rumored territory where they could be free. As they are tracked by government soldiers called brownshirts and sadistic hunters, they only have themselves and each other to rely upon.

I have seen a lot of really bad reviews for this book, many write it off as a cheap Hunger Games/Maze Runner rip off and I would say that is a fair assessment. But I really enjoyed both those books so I guess it’s no surprise that I actually found this a fun read. I do love my “survivor” books and this one, although stretching credibility a great deal, was satisfactory in that aspect. Unfortunately, the world-building and many characters lacked development which made it difficult to understand the whys and wherefores behind the premise of the book.

So although I won’t recommend this book as a “must-read”, I do intend to follow up with the next book in the trilogy at some point. ( )
  DeltaQueen50 | Apr 6, 2017 |
The Maze Runner meets The Hunger Games in this heart-pounding trilogy. Orphaned teens, soon to be hunted for sport, must flee their resettlement camps in their fight for survival and a better life. For in the Republic of the True America, it's always hunting season. Riveting action, intense romance, and gripping emotion make this fast-paced adventure a standout debut.

After a radiation blast burned most of the Earth to a crisp, the new government established settlement camps for the survivors. At the camp, these sixteen-year-old "LTs," are eager to graduate as part of the Rite. Until they learn the dark truth: "LTs" doesn't stand for lieutenants but for Less Thans, feared by society and raised to be hunted for sport. They escape and join forces with the Sisters, twin girls who've suffered their own haunting fate. Together they seek the fabled New Territory, with sadistic hunters hot on their trail. Secrets are revealed, allegiances are made, and lives are at stake. As unlikely Book and fearless Hope lead their quest for freedom, these teens must find the best in themselves to fight the worst in their enemies.
  lkmuir | Nov 30, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0062216015, Hardcover)

The Maze Runner meets The Hunger Games in this heart-pounding trilogy. Orphaned teens, soon to be hunted for sport, must flee their resettlement camps in their fight for survival and a better life. For in the Republic of the True America, it's always hunting season. Riveting action, intense romance, and gripping emotion make this fast-paced adventure a standout debut.

After a radiation blast burned most of the Earth to a crisp, the new government established settlement camps for the survivors. At one such camp, the sixteen-year-old "LTs" are eager to graduate as part of the Rite. Until they learn the dark truth: "LTs" doesn't stand for lieutenant but for Less Thans, feared by society and raised to be hunted for sport. They escape and join forces with the Sisters, twin girls who've suffered their own haunting fate. Together they seek the fabled New Territory, with sadistic hunters hot on their trail. Secrets are revealed, allegiances are made, and lives are at stake. As unlikely Book and fearless Hope lead their quest for freedom, these teens must find the best in themselves to fight the worst in their enemies.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:22 -0400)

"After the apocalyptic Omega, a group of orphaned teen boys learn of their dark fate and escape, joining forces with twin girls who have been imprisoned for the 'good of the republic.' In their plight for freedom, these young heroes must find the best in themselves to fight against the worst in their enemies"--… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.35)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 6
3.5 1
4 3
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 128,049,125 books! | Top bar: Always visible