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Me, Myself, and Us: The Science of…
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Me, Myself, and Us: The Science of Personality and the Art of Well-Being

by Brian R. Little

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What a superb book! It isn't easy to write an accessible book about a subject as complex as what goes into making personality. Little moves through current thinking and research (his own and that of others) and provides an overview that is deeply commonsensical without sacrificing humor and sensitivity. One of the points he makes, over and over, about different aspects of personality is that who you are (as in your default mode) and how you act in any given situation is up to you, provided you are self aware and make that choice. In other words, he's saying that acting 'out of character' is part of being an adult dealing with the world. He talks about ways that stretching yourself are good--up to a point, and that taking care of that core self's needs is very important--up to a point. There is a slant in the book towards the assumption that you are reading it as a searcher, that you want, if possible to increase your acceptance and knowledge about yourself so that you can apply it to your life, to your sense of well-being. Toward that end, combining a realistic view of yourself (both internally and externally) with regular reassessment of your core personal projects, appears to be the key to a sense of well-being. There's so much to this book, I'm going to wrap up here and just say I highly recommend it if you are a permanent self-quester like myself. Here and there he's really funny, too, without it being that sort of cute self-help book funny. Sign of an extravert: While driving from here to there child asks mother, "Where have all the idiots gone?" Mother says,"They only come out when Daddy is driving, dear." ***** ( )
1 vote sibyx | Mar 20, 2017 |
excellent !!! ( )
  stevedulmage | Feb 13, 2015 |
I read this for work. It is a good summary of research on personality and well-being, but it is written in a very accessible way and is intended for a broad audience. Little has devoted his career to research on personality and well-being, and his experience allows him to tell a complex, evidence-based story about how who we are affects our health and happiness. Because some aspects of personality are relatively stable, it is sometimes difficult to know what to do with the evidence linking personality and well-being. Changing personality is a difficult proposition. But Little also discusses free traits, or the ways in which we act that may contradict our stable personality traits, and personal projects, our choices about what we spend time on, and how those elements of personality impact well-being. Readers of this book will likely come away with increased self-awareness as well as a few ideas about how to improve well-being. ( )
  porch_reader | Feb 1, 2015 |
How often have you found yourself thinking someone you thought you knew very well was acting out of character? Is one's personality fixed or can we make changes to our personality to fit the situations we find ourselves in? If we can make changes, is there a cost to our health in doing so? Are we more susceptible to being persuaded by our peers or are we less open to suggestions? Is there a difference between eccentricity and creativity?

The study of personality science is an interesting one, and the author delivers his research in addition to some great personal and anecdotal stories. Perhaps the understanding of what makes us and those close to us tick and why we behave the way we do will enable us to communicate better with them, lower stress and increase our sense of well-being. ( )
1 vote cameling | Jan 3, 2015 |
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