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The Strange Library

by Haruki Murakami

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,5211078,436 (3.44)101
In a fantastical illustrated short novel, three people imprisoned in a nightmarish library plot their escape.
  1. 10
    The Woman in the Dunes by Kōbō Abe (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: protagonists wind-up imprisoned in surreal and somewhat absurd circumstances
  2. 00
    The Silence Room: Short Stories by Sean O'Brien (bluepiano)
    bluepiano: Eerie short stories centred on, although not taking place in, a room in a library basement.
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» See also 101 mentions

English (101)  French (2)  Dutch (1)  Spanish (1)  Catalan (1)  Danish (1)  All languages (107)
Showing 1-5 of 101 (next | show all)
I'll never think of libraries the same way, I will live in constant fear of that creepy librarian willing me to stay and read just a little longer. With elements of Neil Gaiman, Roald Dahl, Guillermo Del Toro and Tim Burton, you're in for a treat! To be read on a dark and stormy night, in a cosy candlelit room with a delicious hot steaming mug of tea. Oh Murakami, be still my beating heart. ( )
  MandaTheStrange | Oct 7, 2020 |
I do not know what to make of this little book. It's a story about a boy who goes to the liberty to check out a book, but the librarian tells him take the books he checks out are for library use only and must go to the reading room. From there things start to go downhill.

It took me a short time to read this book and a long time to think about it. Each character and setting has a meaning.

The jail cell is loneliness.

The Old man is fear and anger.

The Sheep man is to look forward towards the good thing in life no matter what pain your going through at the moment.

The Silent girl is love and kindness

The Starling is worriedness.

Put this all together and the big takeaway from this book is during the hardships of your life you may be lonely, scared, and angry. Keep looking ahead at the good things take will. You may be worry of what to come, but there are people to help you. Friends and family that show love and kindness will always be there for you.

What I got from this weird little book. I don't know if anyone else got the same messages or something else entirely. That is perfectly fine we all different.

At first I thought that there needs to be more to the story. I changed my mind the story is long enough to give it a massage. If it goes on any longer then the messages will be stretch out and water down.
On my kindle edition there artwork that on almost every other page. It surreal and cool to look at.

What I don't like is the library. Yes, I like going to the library, but how does it fit in to this book? I need to re-read this to fully understand that part.
The main character is put off from ever going to the library again. I understand that part, however is the author trying to put people from going to the library. I know that farfetched.

I would like to see someone else's perspective on The Strange Library. If you read this book please let me know what you think of this book. ( )
  AnnaBookcritter | Sep 15, 2020 |
I do not know what to make of this little book. It's a story about a boy who goes to the liberty to check out a book, but the librarian tells him take the books he checks out are for library use only and must go to the reading room. From there things start to go downhill.

It took me a short time to read this book and a long time to think about it. Each character and setting has a meaning.

The jail cell is loneliness.

The Old man is fear and anger.

The Sheep man is to look forward towards the good thing in life no matter what pain your going through at the moment.

The Silent girl is love and kindness

The Starling is worriedness.

Put this all together and the big takeaway from this book is during the hardships of your life you may be lonely, scared, and angry. Keep looking ahead at the good things take will. You may be worry of what to come, but there are people to help you. Friends and family that show love and kindness will always be there for you.

What I got from this weird little book. I don't know if anyone else got the same messages or something else entirely. That is perfectly fine we all different.

At first I thought that there needs to be more to the story. I changed my mind the story is long enough to give it a massage. If it goes on any longer then the messages will be stretch out and water down.
On my kindle edition there artwork that on almost every other page. It surreal and cool to look at.

What I don't like is the library. Yes, I like going to the library, but how does it fit in to this book? I need to re-read this to fully understand that part.
The main character is put off from ever going to the library again. I understand that part, however is the author trying to put people from going to the library. I know that farfetched.

I would like to see someone else's perspective on The Strange Library. If you read this book please let me know what you think of this book. ( )
  AnnaBookcritter | Sep 15, 2020 |
I forgot how readable Murakami's work can be. This was a solid, but odd little novella. The story didn't blow me away but it was a good, quick read.

Ps - just realized this was translated by my Japanese Lit and Film university professor who first introduced me to Murakami's work. Cool! ( )
  scout101 | Sep 15, 2020 |
Read for #17 of #readharder 2020 book riot challenge - fantasy novella
Strange little book. Illustrations added a level of depth to the writing, which itself was simple but poetic in a way. The story is dark and the ending intriguing. This was the first I’ve read by this author but I look forward to other more mainstream ones from him. ( )
  out-and-about | Sep 12, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 101 (next | show all)
Haruki Murakami’s “The Strange Library” is a short story, not a novel. So why, one might wonder, has it been published as a single volume?
added by dcozy | editThe Japan Times, David Cozy (Dec 27, 2014)
 

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Haruki Murakamiprimary authorall editionscalculated
Goossen, TedTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gräfe, UrsulaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kidd, ChipDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Menschik, KatIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Information from the Russian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Epigraph
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The library was even more hushed than usual.
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Information from the Italian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
La notte di luna nuova si avvicinava silenziosamente, come un delfino cieco.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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In a fantastical illustrated short novel, three people imprisoned in a nightmarish library plot their escape.

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